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I'm using HttpWebRequest in a VB.Net WinForms app to get data from an inhouse webservice. The code I'm using works for both GET and POST when run while Fiddler is not running. If I have Fiddler running the GETs work and are captured but a POST doesn't complete. In this case Fiddler captures the initial request but never gets the response and the application doesn't get a response.

The code builds a HttpWebRequest for the POST setting the appropriate properties, encodes the data to be sent into JSON and then does this.

Using postStream As Stream = webrequestobj.GetRequestStream()
    postStream.Write(WebServiceByteData, 0, WebServiceByteData.Length)
End Using

I used WireShark to capture the generated network packets and noticed that when a POST is sent without going through Fiddler the following happens.

  • When "postStream As Stream = webrequestobj.GetRequestStream()" is executed a packet with all of the header info is sent that includes a "Expect: 100-continue" header but doesn't have the request data.
  • When the postStrean.Write call is executed an additional packet is sent that has the request data.

With Fiddler running nothing is put on the wire until after the postStream.Write is executed. At that point both the header packet with the "Expect: 100-continue" header and the request data packet are sent back to back before the service has responded with the "100 Continue". I'm guessing that this confuses the webservice as it doesn't expect to get the request data packet yet. It doesn't respond with the requested data.

I used Composer to manually create the request without the "Expect: 100-continue" header. When this is executed the same two packets are generated and the service responds with the expected data.

So, in order to be able to use Fiddler to capture the POST traffic it looks like I need to either be able to tell HttpWebRequest to not issue the "Expect: 100-continue" header (I've looked but haven't found a way to do this) or for Fiddler to handle the packets differently, maybe not sending the second packet until it sees the "100 Continue" response or by stripping out the "Expect: 100-continue" header.

It's possible that I've missed a setup option in Fiddler but nothing I've tried so far makes any difference.

Thanks, Dave

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1 Answer 1

Old question, but the short answer is that the lack of a 100/Continue response shouldn't have mattered at all.

To learn more about Expect: Continue, including how to remove this header if you like, see http://blogs.msdn.com/b/fiddler/archive/2011/11/05/http-expect-continue-delays-transmitting-post-bodies-by-up-to-350-milliseconds.aspx

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