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I am writing a python (2.7) script that checks if some files are missing and downloads them via wget. Everything works fine, but after the download has finished and the script should exit, the bash (where I started the python script from) is not showing up correctly. I have the cursor and can enter things, but the standard prompt is not showing up. I have to resize the terminal window to make the prompt display correctly. What might be the reason for this?

tilenames = ['File1', 'File2', ...]
web_url = http://...

for t in tilenames:
    try:
        open(t, 'r')
    except IOError:
        print 'file %s not found.' % (t)
        command = ['wget', '-P', './SRTM/', web_url + t ]
        output = Popen(command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)

print "Done"

I think it has something to do with the way the wget process is invoked. The last command print "Done" is actually done before wget writes all of its output into the shell.

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2  
You should consider to use urllib.urlretrieve() instead of wget and os.path.exists() instead of opening all the files (and not closing them). –  Sven Marnach Jul 20 '12 at 13:51
    
You should really consider the comment made by @SvenMarnach . There's no need to rely on a system program (as wget), if you can do the same task with Python libraries. It is easier to handle the output, and doesn't incur in a system overhead by starting a new process for each file. docs.python.org/library/urllib2.html –  stummjr Jul 20 '12 at 14:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just add a .communicate() after output, like this:

tilenames = ['File1', 'File2', ...]
web_url = http://...

for t in tilenames:
    try:
        open(t, 'r')
    except IOError:
        print 'file %s not found.' % (t)
        command = ['wget', '-P', './SRTM/', web_url + t ]
        p = Popen(command, stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
        stdout, stderr = p.communicate()

print "Done"

communicate will return the output written to stdout and None for stderr, because it's not forwarded to a PIPE (you will see it on the terminal instead).

Btw. you should close opened file objects (to check if a file exists you can use the functions in os.path e.g. os.path.exists)

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No, this will work as it is, the wget stderr-output will be redirected to the console instead of a pipe and communicate returns None instead of a string. –  dav1d Jul 20 '12 at 14:56
    
Thx! It works like this: p = Popen(command, stdout=PIPE, stderr=PIPE) stdout, stderr = p.communicate(). What is the reason for that? Do I have to take the stderr output of wget and store it into stderr via .communicate? Why? –  Michbeckable Jul 20 '12 at 14:58
    
communicate is just a safe way of waiting until the process ends. You could also use it to send the process a single time input to stdin: .communicate(input_to_stdin). –  dav1d Jul 20 '12 at 15:00
    
Yes dav1d, it works as it is. You are right. –  Michbeckable Jul 20 '12 at 15:00
    
I see, thats why p.wait() also works. –  Michbeckable Jul 20 '12 at 15:01

wget writes its statistics to stderr, which is why it scrambles your terminal. stdout and stderr are flushed and queried at different intervals, so it is possible that your Done shows up before the output from wget.

A fix would be to call wget with -q or to also redirect stderr using stderr=open("/dev/null", "w") or something similar.

Additionally, you should probably use .communicate() to avoid pipe issues.

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You could use os.system (but see http://docs.python.org/release/2.5.2/lib/node536.html). Basically Popen is intended to ALLOW your python process to read from the command output. You don't seem to need to do that, so the fragment below should get you what you want:

import os
import subprocess

p = subprocess.Popen(['wget','http://www.aol.com'],stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
os.waitpid(p.pid,0)
print "done"
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And BTW, there isn't any particular reason to be directing stdout to a pipe since you don't seem to be using it. –  Marvin Jul 20 '12 at 13:59

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