Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm sure I join many in being glad there's finally a powerful language tied tightly to a mainstream GUI/Database/Communication framework.

I haven't been sure where to post this, but here seems the best spot.

I need to use Unicode symbol characters either as operators or as function names. I'd like syntactic sugar, but I don't need it.

Guy Steele pointed out in Communications of the ACM that "*" was a forced choice when it was adopted from Ascii as multiply, but my software works in Unicode, so I'm not tethered to Ascii anymore.

!$%&*+-./<=>?,@^|~:

Part of localization includes local programmers. Why limit the set of operators that can be defined in F#? It isn’t orthogonal to C#'s and F#'s acceptance of many Unicode IsLetter in identifiers.

Also, F# is likely to be used for symbolic manipulation of problems from logic, math, physicists, etc. It makes work much easier if there’s a direct mapping into the language of the basic operators. (F# and C# accept many Unicode IsLetter? as well as IsDigit’? This is a request to allow Unicode IsSymbol? As operators with the precedence of, for example, *, or, since “+” is both a unary and binary operator, I could put up with the precedence of + and make up the difference with parenthesized groupings.

Consider the domain-specific needs of logicians, mathematicians, physicists, etc. I’d rather write a symbolic differentiator or integrator using math symbols than Ascii permutations of already-taken operators.

  • Logic: ∀ ∃ ⇒
  • Math: ∑ ∫ ∂
  • Group theory: ≤ ≥ ∈ ∉
  • Set Theory: ⊆ ⊇ ⊃ ∪ ∩
  • Tensors: ⊗

I’ve written many languages in other languages, but because F# is tightly .Net-integrated, this issue poses special challenges without language support:

It’s trivial to cobble up a translator that takes Unicode-operator F# source and maps it, line-by-line, to Ascii-operator F# source.

But when debugging, how do I make sure the programmer still sees their untranslated source? And that they can see variable values.

Operators and converts them is trivial. But how do I ensure the translation is what gets compiled, while the programmer sees their own source? If I map line-for-line correctly, how do I ensure they can still point at a variable and see its value?

share|improve this question
    
I've added the f# tag, but to do so I had to get rid of the math tag. I think that's a fair trade (the core problem here is something f# people might now about, rather than something for mathematicians to ponder) –  tialaramex Jul 21 '09 at 13:16
3  
See also cs.hubfs.net/forums/thread/9690.aspx –  Brian Jul 21 '09 at 16:30
add comment

4 Answers

There is a math (Unicode) symbol extension for F# available in the Visual Studio Gallery.

This allows you to define Unicode symbols, e.g.:

let inline (~∑) xs = xs |> Seq.sum

let total = ∑myList
share|improve this answer
add comment

You may be interested in Project Fortress which is a new functional programming language that embraces the Unicode character set (among many other features). In particular, see the Mathematical Syntax in Fortress page which contains some sample code.

share|improve this answer
    
My interest is strong in F# because .Net can be used to create any application that doesn't need C++ performance. And Project Fortress sounds interesting. Thanks. –  Michael Ginn Jul 26 '09 at 6:06
add comment

For an interesting discussion on this check: http://cs.hubfs.net/forums/thread/9690.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
This answer duplicates Brian's comment above. –  bytebuster Feb 6 '13 at 16:46
add comment

Other languages, such as Scala, do permit operators from outside the ASCII range -- mathematical symbols(Sm) and other symbols(So)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.