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Architecture ->GBIP from external interface is connected to target ( linux) system via gpib bus. Inside Linux box , there is ethernet cable from GPIB to motherboard.

The PIC_GPIB card on external interface is IEEE 488.2

I am sending a query from external interface to linux box.

Few scenarios

1) If I send a query which does not expect a response back , then next query send will work.

2) If I send a query which expect response back , and when I have received the response and read it and then fire next query it works fine.

3) BUT if I send a query from external interface and got response back and I ignore to read the response , then Next query fails. I am requesting help for scenario 3.

The coding is done on linux side and its a socket programming , which uses linux inbuilt function from unistd.h for read and write.

My investigation : I have found there is a internal memory on gbib card on external interface which stores the value of previous response until we have the read. Generally I use IEEE string utility software to write commands that goes to linux box and read reposne via read button .

Could someone please direct me how to clean input buffer or memory which stores value so that write from external command contiunues without bothering to read it.

My code on linux side has been developed in C++ and socket programming. I have used in bulit write and read function to write and read to the gpib and to json server.

Sample code is shown below

    bool GpibClass::ReadWriteFromGPIB()
{
  bool check = true;
  int n = 0;
  char buffer[BUFFER_SIZE];
  fd_set read_set;
  struct timeval lTimeOut;

  // Reset the read mask for the select
  FD_ZERO(&read_set);
  FD_SET(mGpibFd, &read_set);
  FD_SET(mdiffFd, &read_set);

  // Set Timeout to check the status of the connection
  // when no data is being received
  lTimeOut.tv_sec = CONNECTION_STATUS_CHECK_TIMEOUT_SECONDS;
  lTimeOut.tv_usec = 0;

  cout << "Entered into this function" << endl;

  // Look for sockets with available data
  if (-1 == select(FD_SETSIZE, &read_set, NULL, NULL, &lTimeOut))
  {
    cout << "Select failed" << endl;

    // We don't know the cause of select's failure.
    // Close everything and start from scratch:
    CloseConnection(mGpibFd);
    CloseConnection(mdifferntServer); // this is different server

    check = false;
  }

  // Check if data is available from GPIB server,
  // and if any read and push it to gpib
  if(true == check)
  {
    cout << "Check data from GPIB after select" << endl;

    if (FD_ISSET(mGpibFd, &read_set))
    {
      n = read(mGpibFd, buffer, BUFFER_SIZE);

      cout << "Read from GPIB" << n << " bytes" << endl;

      if(0 < n)
      {
        // write it to different server and check if we get response from it
      }
      else
      {
        // Something failed on socket read - most likely
        // connection dropped. Close socket and retry later
        CloseConnection(mGpibFd);

        check = false;
      }
    }
  }

  // Check if data is available from different server,
  // and if any read and push it to gpib
  if(true == check)
  {
    cout << "Check data from diff server after select" << endl;

    if (FD_ISSET(mdiffFd, &read_set))
    {
      n = read(mdiffFd, buffer, BUFFER_SIZE);

      cout << "Read from diff servewr " << n << " bytes" << endl;

      if (0 < n)
      {
        // Append, just in case - makes sure data is sent.
        // Extra cr/lf shouldn't cause any problem if the json
        // server has already added them
        strcpy(buffer + n, "\r\n");

        write(mGpibFd, buffer, n + 2);
        std::cout <<" the buffer sixze  = " << buffer << std::endl;

      }
      else
      {
        // Something failed on socket read - most likely
        // connection dropped. Close socket and retry later
        CloseConnection(mdiffFd);

        check = false;
      }
    }
  }

  return check;
}
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This text is so confusing.. Please try to rephrase... –  RedX Jul 20 '12 at 14:25
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1 Answer 1

You should ordinarily be reading responses after any operation which could generate them.

If you fail to do that, an easy solution would be to read responses in a loop until you have drained the queue to empty.

You can reset the instrument (probably *RST), but you would probably loose other state as well. You will have to check it's documentation to see if there is a command to reset only the response queue. Checking the documentation is always a good idea, because the number of instruments which precisely comply with the spec is dwarfed by the number which augment or omit parts in unique ways.

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Thanks for advice , I have posted my sample code , but I guess it doesnt work as expected –  samantha Jul 20 '12 at 15:30
    
What part fails in what way? –  Chris Stratton Jul 20 '12 at 16:32
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