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When a user clicks on Run, the application runs through a lot of code to generate a model and display it in a Chart. The Run takes about 1-2 minutes to run. I also have a Cancel button that gets enabled after the Run button is clicked. I am working with DotSpatial, so my buttons are on a plugin panel in a ribbon UI. The click event on the Run and Cancel start in the plugin, which calls the back-end class's code Run and Click.

When the user hits cancel after the run starts, there is a delay, but the cancel method is invokes and executes, but the run never stops and we eventually see the chart display. So, I'm thinking I need a separate thread for the Run. I'm fairly new to programming, and never worked with Threading. I've looked into it and added the below code, but my thread method isn't running. Here's my code:

The Run button is clicked:

This is at the top:

//check to see if RunModel thread needs to stop or continue
private volatile bool stopRun = false;
private Thread runThread;

Then this is the method that's called from the click event:

public void btnRun_testingThread(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   //create a new thread to run the RunModel
   if (runThread == null)
   { 
       //we don't want to stop this thread
       stopRun = false;

       runThread = new Thread(RunModel);  
       runThread.Start();              <--this isn't doing anything
   }

So, I would think that when the code gets to the runThread.Start(), it would jump into my RunModel method and start running through the code. But it doesn't. Additionally, I'll want to cancel out of this thread (once I have it working correctly), so I have this, which gets called from the cancel click method:

private void StopRunThread()
{
    if (runThread != null)
    {
        //we want to stop the thread
        stopRun = true;
        //gracefully pause until the thread exits
        runThread.Join();
        runThread = null;
    }
}

Then the this is the RunModel() where I'm checking occasionally to see if the stopRun bool has changed.

public void RunModel()
{
    ...some code.....

    //check to see if cancel was clicked
    if (stopRun)
    {
        ....clean up code....
        return;
    }

    ....some more code....

    //check to see if cancel was clicked
    if (stopRun)
    {
      ....clean up code....
       return;
    }
}

And the cancel button click method:

public void btnCancel_Click(Object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    stopRun = true;
    StopRunThread();
    //the model run has been canceled

    ....some code.....
}

Any help on getting the thread.start to actually run the Run method? Then do I need to constantly check the volatile bool in the run in order to clean everything up if it's being stopped? Thanks!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

I think you'd be best looking at the BackgroundWorker - this essentially runs separately but can watch out for cancellation commands. Make sure you add 'WorkerSupportCancellation' when you initialise it:

BackgroundWorker backgroundWorker1 = new BackgroundWorker();
backgroundWorker1.DoWork += new DoWorkEventHandler(backgroundWorker1_DoWork); // This does the job ...
backgroundWorker1.WorkerSupportsCancellation = true; // This allows cancellation.

Then on click you can start your process:

public void btnRun_testingThread(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   backgroundWorker1.RunWorkerAsync();
}

Your cancel button can issue a cancellation request:

public void btnCancel_Click(Object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    backgroundWorker1.CancelAsync();
}

Then your worker can monitor for this as it's doing it's work ...

void backgroundWorker1_DoWork(object sender, DoWorkEventArgs e)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        if (backgroundWorker1.CancellationPending)
        {
            break;
        }
        else
        {
            // Do whatever you're doing.
        }
    }
    e.Result = backgroundWorker1.CancellationPending ? null : orders;
}

You can enhance this further by adding progress bars etc., but that gets a bit more complicated so I won't go into it here.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not dealing with a loop at all. (See above comment to other answer). I just want to be able to Cancel the long processing Run at any time. –  Tonia Roddick Jul 20 '12 at 14:49
    
You could try to turn your series of function into a loop. Make a collection of functions and iterate through them. Every time you move to the next function check to see if the cancel button has been hit. –  Brad Jul 20 '12 at 15:04
    
Or you could have a timer run off of your second thread that checks the cancellation state every so often. There are ways to make a loop out of a non-loop –  Brad Jul 20 '12 at 15:10

Considering new info provided in commend I believe you just missed a start of the RunModel() method in debugger because of wrong assumption regarding thread.Start() method behaviour.

Please see a note from MSDN, Thread.Start Method

Once a thread is in the ThreadState.Running state, the operating system can schedule it for execution. The thread begins executing at the first line of the method represented by the ThreadStart or ParameterizedThreadStart delegate supplied to the thread constructor.

Small demonstration that thread start takes some time bits, for me it starts in 38-40 milliseconds:

Stopwatch watch = new Stopwatch();
Thread thread = new Thread((ThreadStart)watch.Stop);
thread.Start();
watch.Start();

Thread.Sleep(5000);
double startedAfter = watch.ElapsedMilliseconds;

Since .NET Framework 4.0 consider using TPL Tasks rather than threads explicitly, some pros:

  • You can easily synchronize with UI thread by passing in a Task UI Thread synchronization context
  • You can easily stop a Taks using CancellationToken
share|improve this answer
    
I can't even get the RunModel() to execute from 'runThread.Start();'. I ran in debug mode, and the code just hits that line and then continues to the next. So, I'm not getting my thread to work. There is no loop. The process to run works with IronPython and statistical stuff I don't deal with, so we want to have the Cancel be able to stop the process. I thought Thread was the way to go..maybe not?? –  Tonia Roddick Jul 20 '12 at 14:48
    
@ToniaRoddick: rigth, this is possible that RunModel() method will start not exactly as next line in debugger after the thread.Start() call, some delay might occur for some thread initialization/context allocation work, just press F5 (run in debug) and see whether it stopped on break point at the start of RunModel() –  sll Jul 20 '12 at 14:52
    
Also please see updated answer –  sll Jul 20 '12 at 14:58

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