Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a script which executes some command using os.popen4. Problem is some time command being executed will require user input ("y" or "n"). I am reading stdout/stderr and printing it, but it seems question from command doesn't got printed and it hangs. To make it work, i had to write "n" to stdin blindly. Can some one please guide on how to handle it?

Code not working:

   (f_p_stdin, f_p_stdout_stderr) = os.popen4(cmd_exec,"t")
    cmd_out = f_p_stdout_stderr.readlines()
    print cmd_out
    f_p_stdin.write("n")
    f_p_stdin.close()
    f_p_stdout_stderr.close()

Working Code:

   (f_p_stdin, f_p_stdout_stderr) = os.popen4(cmd_exec,"t")
    cmd_out = f_p_stdout_stderr.readlines()
    f_p_stdin.write("n")
    f_p_stdin.close()
    print cmd_out
    f_p_stdout_stderr.close()

NOTE : I am aware that it is depreciated and subprocess module is used, but right now i don't know on how to use it. So i'll appreciate if some one will help me to handle it using os.popen4. I want to capture the question and handle the input from user and execute it.

share|improve this question
1  
os.popen4 is deprecated in favor of subprocess.Popen –  Jakob Bowyer Jul 20 '12 at 15:23
    
Your working code doesn't work for me. (I'm using python 2.7.3 on Ubuntu.) I get a IOError: [Errno 32] Broken pipe error on closing stdin. –  Matthew Adams Jul 20 '12 at 16:13
    
I am using Python 2.7 on windows –  sarbjit Jul 21 '12 at 3:27

1 Answer 1

readlines() : returns a list containing all the lines of data in the file. If reading from a process like in this case, there is a good chance it does not send a newline and/or flush the output. You should read characters from the input and process that to see if the question was posed.

It would help to know what cmd_exec looks like, so others can try and emulate what you tried.


Update:

I wrote a uncheckout command in Python:

#! /usr/bin/env python
# coding: utf-8

import sys

print 'Uncheckout of {} is irreversible'.format(sys.argv[1])
print 'Do you want to proceed? [y/N]',
sys.stdout.flush()
x = raw_input()

if x == 'y':
    print sys.argv[1], "no longer checked out"
else:
    print sys.argv[1], "still checked out"

I put the prompt string on purpose not as argument to raw_input, to be able to do the flush() explicitly.

Neither of your code snippets work with that (assuming cmd_exec to be ['./uncheckout', 'abc.txt'] or './uncheckout abc.txt', popen4() uses the shell in the latter case to start the program). Only when I move the readlines() until after the write() and close() will the command continue. That makes sense to me as the close() flushes the output. You are writing in text mode and that buffers normally until end-of-line, which is not in your .write('n').

To be able to check what the prompt is and test and react on that., the following works with the above uncheckout:

#! /usr/bin/env python
# coding: utf-8

import os
import sys

cmd_exec = ['./uncheckout', 'abc.txt']

(f_p_stdin, f_p_stdout_stderr) = os.popen4(cmd_exec,"t")
line = ''
while True:
    x = f_p_stdout_stderr.read(1)
    if not x:
        break
    sys.stdout.write(x)
    sys.stdout.flush()
    if x == '\n':
        line = ''
    else:
        line += x
    if line.endswith('[y/N]'):
        f_p_stdin.write("n\n")
        f_p_stdin.flush()
        sys.stdout.write('\n')

Maybe you can work backwards from that to make something that works for you. Make sure to keep flushes at appropriate places.

share|improve this answer
    
Basically I was trying clearcase uncheckout command which asks question whether to save a private copy or not where user needs to input "Y" or "N". This can be emulated on linux for copy command if the destination file exists. –  sarbjit Mar 16 '13 at 4:43
    
@sarbjit I update the Answer, it now should provide a working basis to go from, first test it, the make the script use the real uncheckout command etc. –  Anthon Mar 17 '13 at 20:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.