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So, I'll make an application for checking links if they're accessible(live). My question is how to make the threads "always busy". What I mean: The app run 100 threads(created with FOR loop for example) with 100 different URLs. So when 1 of the threads finish it's job(check if URL is available) to get new URL and start again immediately. So the 100 threads will work non-stop till all URLs are checked.

How can I accomplish that?

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How many cores are you dealing with here? 100 threads is likely to be more counter productive than helpful. –  Adam Jul 20 '12 at 15:27
    
Getting URLs is expensive and a single threaded application is likely to be IO bound but you may need to decrease the number of threads from 100 to get the most efficient code, you should test different numbers of threads. You should also try just a HEAD request, I'm guessing you don't actually care about the content of the page, just that it exists and the URL is valid. –  joocer Jul 20 '12 at 15:33
4  
For those, who said/upvoted 100 thread is a terrible idea: On my dual core 2GB RAM XP machine Parallel.Foreach never created more than 5 threads(unless I set ThreadPool.SetMinThreads) and creating 100 threads resulted always ~30-40% faster operation. So don't leave everything to Parallel.Foreach . PS: My test code WebClient wc = new WebClient();var s = wc.DownloadString(url); (google's home page) –  L.B Jul 20 '12 at 15:54
    
+1 for actually trying it. Sure, if the operations are I/O bound, a large number of threads should help. There are many factors, eg. the DNS server may not appreciate 200 lookups from one client - it may think that a DOS attack is under way:( –  Martin James Jul 20 '12 at 16:04
    
@MartinJames Of course, I just wanted show that while I/O bounds ops are done, 2 threads per cpu may not be enough –  L.B Jul 20 '12 at 16:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

What you are looking for is called the Producer-Consumer Model. You have a pool of resources, that contains the list of urls to check, one thread can fill that pool, and your conumer threads can pull from that pool, if you have .NET 4 Parallel.ForEach does most of the work for you.

Using 100 threads also is very likely not going to be the optimum number of threads, just let the Task Parallel Library manage the thread count for you.

Here is a example if the list will be pre-populated and not have more items added as the thread is running.

//Parallel.Foreach will block until it is done so you may want to run this function on a background worker.
public void StartThreads()
{
    List<string> myListOfUrls = GetUrls();

    Parallel.Foreach(myListOfUrls, ProcessUrl);
}


private void ProcessUrl(string url)
{
    //Do your work here, this code will be run from multiple threads.
}

If you need to populate the collection as it runs, replace List<string> with a concurrent collection like BlockingCollection

BlockingCollection<string> myListOfUrls = new BlockingCollection();

//Parallel.Foreach will block until it is done so you may want to run this function on a background worker.
public void StartThreads()
{
    if(myListOfUrls.IsComplete == true)
        //The collection has emptied itself and you told it you where done using it, you will either need to throw a exception or make a new collection.
        //use IsCompleatedAdding to check to see if you told it that you are done with it, but there still may be members left to process.

    Parallel.Foreach(myListOfUrls, ProcessUrl);
}

public void StopThreads()
{
    myListOfUrls.CompletedAdding()
}

public void AddUrl(string url)
{
    myListOfUrls.Add(url);
}

private void ProcessUrl(string url)
{
    //Do your work here, this code will be run from multiple threads.
}

I also wanted to add that the automated thread scheduling may not be the best also, it may put some limits that could be expanded on, see this comment from the original question

For those, who said/upvoted 100 thread is a terrible idea: On my dual core 2GB RAM XP machine Parallel.Foreach never created more than 5 threads(unless I set ThreadPool.SetMinThreads) and creating 100 threads resulted always ~30-40% faster operation. So don't leave everything to Parallel.Foreach . PS: My test code WebClient wc = new WebClient();var s = wc.DownloadString(url); (google's home page) – L.B

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1  
Good answer. Using PLinq, the machine can determine wheter it will use multiple threads for performance. +1 For referring to the Producer-Consumer Model. –  Maurice Stam Jul 20 '12 at 15:25
1  
Def wanna mention that 100 threads is a terrible idea. At most, two threads per core. With 100 threads, you're just making things worse than if you had no threads at all. –  seekerOfKnowledge Jul 20 '12 at 15:26
    
Hmm, that thing with the number of the threads intrigued me. Why is that? I thought my problem was the internet connection. PS: The answer with the producer-consumer model is all I need. Thanks! –  user1410644 Jul 20 '12 at 15:29
4  
@user1410644 You have to think about where the bottleneck is, if you are at 100% cpu throwing more threads at it wont solve the problem, if at 100 threads you are still stitting at idle because all of the queires are waiting on a networked servers you need more threads. The Parallel.Foreach manages both situations for you, it will make as many threads as it needs, be it 2 or 2000. The only place it wont help you is if you are at idle, but the thing you are waiting on is saturated with requests so more requests won't help, Reading a files from the hard disk is a good example of this problem. –  Scott Chamberlain Jul 20 '12 at 15:36
1  
@seekerOfKnowledge - then my machine is in trouble now - Kapersky and Sidebar have 133 threads between them. 'System' has 241. 200 threads is nothing. The bottleneck is likely to be DNS lookup performance. –  Martin James Jul 20 '12 at 16:11

Use the Parallel CTP stuff, the parallel foreach method included will do exactly what you want.

Google is your friend.

Also, using 100 threads may not be best for performance, I would use however many cores are available.

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+1 for the 100 threads part. –  Inisheer Jul 20 '12 at 15:25
    
From what I've read, seems that two threads per core is standard. –  seekerOfKnowledge Jul 20 '12 at 15:25
    
So the problem with the threads is if the app is parallelized or generally? –  user1410644 Jul 20 '12 at 15:32
    
You do know that CTP meant "Community Tech Preview"? It was how Microsoft originally released the 'beta' version. This is now fully released as the PLINQ and Task Parallel Library in .NET 4.0. –  Ray Hayes Jul 20 '12 at 15:51
    
@RayHayes - Yes, but the OP didn't state .NET version. –  Marlon Jul 20 '12 at 16:03

You could use ThreadPool and give it the list of urls to process, then let a DoWork method handle the checking of whether they are live or not, e.g.

 foreach (string s in URLs)
 {
       ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(new WaitCallback(DoWork), s);
 }

 public void DoWork(object sender)
 {
       string url = (string)sender;
       //do stuff with url here
  }
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