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Given a function that takes two arguments:

let f (a:int) (b:int) : string = sprintf "%d %d" a b

And a list of tuples:

let myList = [(1,2) ; (3,3)]

How do I partially apply the tuple operator (||>) using a map?

myList |> List.map ((||>) f)            //doesn't work
myList |> List.map (fun x -> (||>) x f) //boring

It seems like I need to reverse the arguments that ||> needs.

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Is ||> a custom operator? I don't see it in the F# symbol and operator reference at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd233228.aspx –  Mark Pattison Jul 20 '12 at 15:35
1  
@MarkPattison that is a built-in operator ('a * 'b -> ('a -> 'b -> 'c) -> 'c) –  Ramon Snir Jul 20 '12 at 15:44
1  
@Mark : See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee340237.aspx –  ildjarn Jul 20 '12 at 16:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted
myList |> List.map ((<||) f)
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Well, using (<||) as @desco did is the shortest answer. You can easily write in point-free style using uncurry:

let inline uncurry f (x, y) = f x y
myList |> List.map (uncurry f)

or even more bizarre with built-in functions:

myList |> List.map ((|>) f << (||>))

Proof:

(|>) f << (||>)
<=> fun x -> ((|>) f << (||>)) x
<=> fun x -> ((|>) f) ((||>) x)
<=> fun x -> (|>) f ((||>) x)
<=> fun x -> f |> ((||>) x)
<=> fun x -> (||>) x f
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this is really well done –  Paul Nikonowicz Jul 20 '12 at 18:37

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