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I have the following situation: in a JCombobox, the preferred size is based on the largest item size. However, this computation does not take into account the value rendered for null. It only cares about values inside the model. So when the text for rendering the null value is greater than the other element, the label is truncated and I have the three dots (...) at the end. I would like to avoid that situation.

Here is a small demo of what I am talking about:

Truncated null value rendered

import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.GridBagLayout;

import javax.swing.DefaultListCellRenderer;
import javax.swing.JComboBox;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JList;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

public class TestComboBox {

    protected void initUI() {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame(TestComboBox.class.getSimpleName());
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        JPanel panel = new JPanel(new GridBagLayout());
        JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox(new Object[] { "Something", "Stuff", "Beep" });
        comboBox.setRenderer(new DefaultListCellRenderer() {
            @Override
            public Component getListCellRendererComponent(JList<?> list, Object value, int index, boolean isSelected, boolean cellHasFocus) {
                Component comp = super.getListCellRendererComponent(list, value, index, isSelected, cellHasFocus);
                if (value == null) {
                    setText("No selection");
                }
                return comp;
            }
        });
        comboBox.setSelectedItem(null);
        panel.add(comboBox);
        frame.add(panel);
        frame.setSize(200, 100);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new TestComboBox().initUI();
            }
        });
    }
}

I was wondering if you had any suggestion. So far, my idea was to extend JComboBox, override preferred size, perform also the rendering for the null value and take the greatest dimension of the call to super.preferredSize and the one of the null value rendering. But I find this a bit disappointing.

I would really prefer not using a prototypeDisplayValue is definitely not an option since I don't have any idea of the values that will be in that dropdown.

share|improve this question
1  
JComboBox.setPrototypeDisplayValue() in the case that need to force the size on the screen, and to check Rob's code examples –  mKorbel Jul 20 '12 at 15:37
    
@mKorbel for me, setting a prototype display value is the same as forcing the preferred size and I would like to avoid that situation. I have no idea of the values that will be inside the combobox and it is likely that in some case, it will be bigger than the null value rendering. I also don't want the combo box to take an excessive space by forcing a preferred size. I just want my JComboBox to take the exact required space to display all values, including the null value, although the null value is not in the ComboBoxModel. –  Guillaume Polet Jul 20 '12 at 15:40
    
I have no idea of the values that will be inside the combobox this could be contraproductive in already visible GUI –  mKorbel Jul 20 '12 at 17:39
    
@mKorbel thanks for following up. In fact, we have built a complete generaic interface builder where everything is bound to actual classes and code. You can do all this graphically. The interface builder automatically looks up Java classes, available method, compatible types, etc... So this means that the combo box does not know the values that will be inside of it. At a very late stage, I can find it out, but not early. Moreover, the combobox can be bound to dynamical model, so the values can change several times. –  Guillaume Polet Jul 20 '12 at 18:42
    
aaach this is the same issue like as container size, set the nature size, because you have and need to know how is max size ...., in the case that this code is only from one Native OS –  mKorbel Jul 20 '12 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I did not test this in code but my approach would be to:

  1. Determine the difference between the preferredSize of the Component returned by the renderer, and the actual preferredSize of the JComboBox. Not by using any hard-coded values, but just by creating a JComboBox behind-the-scenes which contains only one item and a known renderer, and comparing the preferred size of the JComboBox with the size of the Component returned by the known renderer.
  2. Repeat step 1 each time the Look-and-Feel is changed by attaching a listener to the UIManager
  3. Override the getPreferredSize of the actual JComboBox and return the maximum of the width of super.getPreferredSize() and the getPreferredSize( rendererComponent ) + calculatedDifference

This should take care of Look-and-Feel issues, avoid unnecessary calculations and you can easily create a JComboBox extension which includes this functionality.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like the chosen approach and this makes it cross L&F robust. I'll let you know the outcome –  Guillaume Polet Jul 20 '12 at 19:03
    
@GuillaumePolet Appreciated it if you posted the outcome (and possibly the come). Wondering myself whether this will actually work –  Robin Jul 20 '12 at 19:05
    
actually when I tried your idea, I found out that there is a much simpler approach which is to create a JComboBox with a single value: null and get its preferred size directly. Then make the union between the super.getPreferredSize() and the preferred size of that combo box and return it as the preferred size. Simple, no hack, and work across all platforms and L&F. I updated my answer to show that. –  Guillaume Polet Jul 20 '12 at 19:17
    
@GuillaumePolet you are right, should have thought of that –  Robin Jul 20 '12 at 20:50
    
FYI, I posted an alternate solution to what we discussed which is not too bad either. –  Guillaume Polet Jul 22 '12 at 13:48

I'm going to take advantage of the fact that we know that the Component returned from DefaultListCellRenderer.getListCellRendererComponent is the DefaultListCellRenderer object itself, and that it is an instance of JLabel.

I'm also assuming that your look-and-feel calculates the combo box preferred size in the usual way, similar to BasicComboBoxUI.

With that information, this solution is perhaps ugly and inefficient, but it works:

    comboBox.setRenderer(new DefaultListCellRenderer() {

        @Override
        public Component getListCellRendererComponent(JList list, Object value, int index, boolean isSelected, boolean cellHasFocus) {
            Component comp = super.getListCellRendererComponent(list, value, index, isSelected, cellHasFocus);
            if (value == null) {
                setText("No selection");
            }
            return comp;
        }

      @Override
      public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
        // this doesn't work:
        // int minWidth = (new JLabel("No selection").getPreferredSize()).width;

        // this does work:
        String oldText = getText();
        setText("No selection");
        int minWidth = (super.getPreferredSize()).width;
        setText(oldText);


        Dimension d = super.getPreferredSize();
        if (d.width < minWidth) {
          return new Dimension(minWidth, d.height);
        } else {
          return d;
        }
      }
share|improve this answer
    
First, thanks for taking the time to read the question and write an answer. While this approach is close to what I suggest, this is not sufficient nor really robust. Not sufficient: you don't take into account the size of the borders nor the arrow button on the right, so the size is still too small. Not robust: across different look & feels, there are several other stuffs that must be taken into account in the preferred size. –  Guillaume Polet Jul 20 '12 at 18:39
    
@GuillaumePolet you can overcome one of those by asking the renderer to create a component for the null value and measure that width. However, I agree about the borders, ... (as I was planning on posting more or less the same answer but I encountered those same problems) –  Robin Jul 20 '12 at 18:44
    
@Robin yes that's what I had in mind. Take a look at the answer I posted. I am just looking for improvements to my code or any better approach. Suggestions and critics are welcomed. Thanks. –  Guillaume Polet Jul 20 '12 at 18:48
    
@GuillaumePolet I actually did test my answer in two look-and-feels and it worked perfectly in both. But somehow I got lucky with Substance and Metal! I've now tried some others and it doesn't work. I did think about the problem of leaving room for the arrow button, but it looked to me like BasicComboBoxUI.getMinimumSize() is already adding a correction for that. It walks through all the renderers, finds the largest size, and then adds some extra room for the button and decorations. So all I need to do is calculate the size of the renderer itself properly. –  Enwired Jul 20 '12 at 21:51
    
I've added an updated version of my answer which works in at least 5 LAFs. But, in the end, I'd probably use the version @GuillaumePolet posted himself. –  Enwired Jul 20 '12 at 21:57

So here is what I've got so far, but one major problem is the cross L&F issues. The alternative would be to go across all the values of the ComboBox model and the value "No selection" and check which one is the longest. Then I could set it as the prototypeDisplayValue. The issue is that I need a Graphical context to measure the bounds of each string.

Here are 2 solutions we have found out with @Enwired and @Robin. Thanks to both of them.

EDIT: after discussing with @Robin I found out that this solution is actually much simpler and works across all platforms and look and feels. The only drawback is that we need to create an extra JComboBox.

import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.GridBagLayout;

import javax.swing.DefaultListCellRenderer;
import javax.swing.JComboBox;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JList;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class TestComboBox {

    protected void initUI() {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame(TestComboBox.class.getSimpleName());
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        JPanel panel = new JPanel(new GridBagLayout());
        JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox(new Object[] { "Something", "Stuff", "Beep" }) {

            private JComboBox internal;

            private JComboBox getInternalComboBox() {
                if (internal == null) {
                    internal = new JComboBox(new Object[] { null });
                }
                return internal;
            }

            @Override
            public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
                Dimension preferredSize = super.getPreferredSize();
                if (getSelectedItem() == null) {
                    getInternalComboBox().setRenderer(getRenderer());
                    Dimension nullDimension = getInternalComboBox().getPreferredSize();
                    preferredSize.width = Math.max(preferredSize.width, nullDimension.width);
                    preferredSize.height = Math.max(preferredSize.height, nullDimension.height);
                }
                return preferredSize;
            }

            @Override
            public void updateUI() {
                internal = null;
                super.updateUI();
            }
        };
        comboBox.setRenderer(new DefaultListCellRenderer() {
            @Override
            public Component getListCellRendererComponent(JList list, Object value, int index, boolean isSelected, boolean cellHasFocus) {
                Component comp = super.getListCellRendererComponent(list, value, index, isSelected, cellHasFocus);
                if (value == null) {
                    setText("No selection");
                }
                return comp;
            }
        });
        comboBox.setSelectedItem(null);
        panel.add(comboBox);
        frame.add(panel);
        frame.setSize(200, 100);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ClassNotFoundException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException,
            UnsupportedLookAndFeelException {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new TestComboBox().initUI();
            }
        });
    }
}

EDIT 2: After discussing with @Enwired this alternative solution came up which is to directly override the ListCellRenderer getPreferredSize. In this one you can try to go through the different available L&F.

import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.GridBagLayout;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;

import javax.swing.DefaultListCellRenderer;
import javax.swing.JComboBox;
import javax.swing.JComponent;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JList;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import javax.swing.UIManager;
import javax.swing.UIManager.LookAndFeelInfo;
import javax.swing.UnsupportedLookAndFeelException;

public class TestComboBox {

    protected void initUI() {
        final JFrame frame = new JFrame(TestComboBox.class.getSimpleName());
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        JPanel panel = new JPanel(new GridBagLayout());
        JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox(new Object[] { "Something", "Stuff", "Beep" });
        comboBox.setRenderer(new DefaultListCellRenderer() {

            private Dimension nullDimesion;

            @Override
            public Component getListCellRendererComponent(JList list, Object value, int index, boolean isSelected, boolean cellHasFocus) {
                if (value != null && nullDimesion == null) {
                    nullDimesion = ((JComponent) getListCellRendererComponent(list, null, -1, false, false)).getPreferredSize();
                }
                Component comp = super.getListCellRendererComponent(list, value, index, isSelected, cellHasFocus);
                if (value == null) {
                    setText("No selection");
                }
                return comp;
            }

            @Override
            public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
                Dimension preferredSize = super.getPreferredSize();
                if (nullDimesion != null) {
                    preferredSize.width = Math.max(preferredSize.width, nullDimesion.width);
                    preferredSize.height = Math.max(preferredSize.height, nullDimesion.height);
                }
                return preferredSize;
            }

            @Override
            public void updateUI() {
                nullDimesion = null;
                super.updateUI();
            }
        });
        comboBox.setSelectedItem(null);
        final JComboBox uiComboBox = new JComboBox(UIManager.getInstalledLookAndFeels());
        uiComboBox.setRenderer(new DefaultListCellRenderer() {
            @Override
            public Component getListCellRendererComponent(JList list, Object value, int index, boolean isSelected, boolean cellHasFocus) {
                Component comp = super.getListCellRendererComponent(list, value, index, isSelected, cellHasFocus);
                if (value instanceof LookAndFeelInfo) {
                    LookAndFeelInfo info = (LookAndFeelInfo) value;
                    setText(info.getName());
                }
                return comp;
            }
        });
        uiComboBox.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
                    @Override
                    public void run() {
                        try {
                            UIManager.setLookAndFeel(((LookAndFeelInfo) uiComboBox.getSelectedItem()).getClassName());
                            SwingUtilities.updateComponentTreeUI(frame);
                        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e1) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e1.printStackTrace();
                        } catch (InstantiationException e1) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e1.printStackTrace();
                        } catch (IllegalAccessException e1) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e1.printStackTrace();
                        } catch (UnsupportedLookAndFeelException e1) {
                            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                            e1.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                });
            }
        });
        panel.add(comboBox);
        panel.add(uiComboBox);
        frame.add(panel);
        frame.setSize(300, 100);
        frame.setVisible(true);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws ClassNotFoundException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException,
            UnsupportedLookAndFeelException {
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new TestComboBox().initUI();
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Feel free to comment or criticize the approach, that's what I am looking for ;-) –  Guillaume Polet Jul 20 '12 at 18:46
    
I have placed a possible approach in an answer (too long for a comment) but I must stress I did not tested that approach, and I am certainly not a specialist in altering Swing components. Just familiar with using them –  Robin Jul 20 '12 at 19:01
    
In the second example, in the ActionListener which is changing the LAF, you need to wrap that in a call to invokeLater(). Even though you are already on the event thread, you don't want the LAF to change until the combo box is finished making the selection. (I discovered this by playing with the example. Using the up/down keys on the second combo box gives an exception.) –  Enwired Jul 20 '12 at 23:16
    
@Enwired OK I will look into this. It's quite possible indeed that the UI should be updated from an un-nested event. Cheers. –  Guillaume Polet Jul 21 '12 at 20:59

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