Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a "maincontent" div that contains, well, my content. There's some javascript (Fancybox) in it to show images. I'm trying to have the height of the div automatically change to accompany whatever's in it so that the div itself doesn't scroll, but the entire webpage does.

Here's a page I'd like to fix: http://willryan.us/content/photo.html

I've tried messing with min-heights, height:auto, overflow:auto, etc, with no result. Height:auto acts as thought the text is the only thing in the div, like its completely ignoring the javascript images.

Here's my css as it is now:

div#content {
overflow:auto;
width:958px;
height: 800px;
position:absolute;
top:50px;
left:0px;
background-color:#C0CACE;

border:1px solid;
border-color:#616161;

-webkit-box-shadow:  0px 0px 50px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);
box-shadow:  0px 0px 50px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);
z-index:1;

}

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

The problem has to do with photobox div, if you turn off position absolute, it works to its height, turn off height and it fits.

This problem could be avoided if you didn't use absolute positioning when you don't need it.

You should rebuild your page using relative positioning. It should be quite easy considering you just need to center the div's you are using with text-align:center; on their parents.

share|improve this answer
    
Probably a dumb question, but will tex-align:center; align things that aren't text? –  Will Ryan Jul 20 '12 at 16:16
    
@WillRyan Event_Horizon's statement and the fiddle example are not correct. The word "Test" is a textNode and therefore centered! Only inline elements will be centered, not block elements such as DIV tags. Set for instance 50px width on the inner div, It won't be centered anymore. –  Peter Pajchl Jul 20 '12 at 16:34
    
@WillRyan @PeterPajchl is right, I erred in my haste. To center block elements the easiest way is using margin: 0 auto :jsfiddle.net/cNdNg/1 –  Event_Horizon Jul 20 '12 at 17:13

Your problem lies with using absolute positioning. Use static positioning (default) for regular document flow and you won't have this problem.

UPDATE

You don't use relative positioning either.

Regular document flow (without explicitly specifying it) is position: static; you use absolute. Absolute positioning basically takes the element out of the regular flow of the document and places it based it's nearest relatively positioned parent.

What you should be doing... If you need your wrapper positioned in the "center". Set "wrapper" to positon:relative with margin: 0px auto; and remove absolute positon from all inner elements. If you need to indent elements inside wrapper use padding/margin.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but I've only used absolute positioning in everything I've code (which isn't much). Are you saying I should use relative positioning? –  Will Ryan Jul 20 '12 at 16:06
    
I will update my answer.. –  Peter Pajchl Jul 20 '12 at 16:10
    
Thanks, I'll try that. Is there a difference between padding and margin? –  Will Ryan Jul 20 '12 at 16:19
    
@WillRyan Padding is inside border, margin is outside w3.org/TR/css3-box –  Event_Horizon Jul 20 '12 at 16:21

I'll suggest you to use position: relative to not use position:absolute in your maincontent children. You don't really need absolute here.

  1. Remove #content height (or use min-height)
  2. Remove #photobox height (or use min-height)
  3. Remove #content overflow
  4. Set all #content children position to relative (use margins if necessary)

.

div#header {
   background-image:url(content/assets/elements/header.png);backround-repeat:none;
   width:960px;
   height:50px;
   z-index:2;
   -webkit-border-radius: 10px 10px 0px 0px;
   border-radius: 10px 10px 0px 0px;
   -webkit-box-shadow:  0px 0px 30px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);
   box-shadow:  0px 0px 30px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);
}

div#footer {
   background-image:url(content/assets/elements/footer.png);
   backround-repeat:none;
   width:960px;
   height:50px;
   z-index:2;
   -webkit-border-radius: 0px 0px 10px 10px;
   border-radius: 0px 0px 10px 10px;
   -webkit-box-shadow:  0px 0px 30px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);
   box-shadow:  0px 0px 30px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);
}

div#content {
   width:958px;
   background-color:#C0CACE;
   border:1px solid;
   border-color:#616161;
   -webkit-box-shadow:  0px 0px 50px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);
   box-shadow:  0px 0px 50px 0px rgba(0, 0, 0, 1);
   z-index:1;
   overflow: visible;
}

div#photobox {
   width: 769px;
   margin-left: 95.5px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There is no need to add "width" property on every element. Only the main wrapper needs width, all children should reflow accordingly either by 100% as block element should or use padding/margin to modify the inner layout. Overflow:visible is obsolete since it is default value for overflow. –  Peter Pajchl Jul 20 '12 at 16:08
    
Thanks! I'll give this a go. You don't have it in the code, but do I need to put "position:relative" somewhere? Actually I just realized that all those elements (header, footer, content, photobox) aren't contained in a div. Should I put them in a maincontent div, and have position:relative for that div? –  Will Ryan Jul 20 '12 at 16:10
    
You don't need any position:relative here. You only need one when some children are in absolute. –  zessx Jul 20 '12 at 16:33
    
@PeterPajchl thanks for the precision, I let it because it doesn't impact on the height problem (I've used the original code) –  zessx Jul 20 '12 at 16:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.