Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently working on a project which involves a large number of iterations (2^32 to be exact). I have mainly been using mathematica for most of my calculations, but it can't handle that sort of amount of processes. It has been suggested to me that c++ would be able to handle it, so last night I learnt c++ and wrote the following code:

//old code  

The code runs fine, (I checked on smaller parameters) but I have started running it for 4294967295 = 2^32-1 steps, and I think it will take hundreds of hours. I would be really grateful if someone could tell me if there are ways to optimize bits of this code so that it will run faster? I have no experience with this kind of language and so how I've constructed the functions probably looks quite messy. I think my Ca2step function runs quite efficiently (I'm probably wrong), and I think its my loops in the main section that are slowing everything down. I think there must be faster methods for what I am trying to accomplish, so any help would be great. Thanks, Richard.

======= UPDATE ========

Thanks so much everybody, I really appreciate it. Ok I this is all very new to me, so I'm finding it quite hard to understand what some things mean. Below is my updated code. However I get the feeling that it's still just as slow. Some people suggested "parallelising" but I don't know what this is and how I would do it? Thanks again, Richard.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
using namespace std;

//parameters
int a[32] = {0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0,
             1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1};
int b[32] = {1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 
             1, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1};
// Create vector of vectors from arrays to be input into function.
vector<int> va (a, a + sizeof(a) / sizeof(int) );
vector<int> vb (b, b + sizeof(b) / sizeof(int) );

vector< vector<int> > ca2step (long int r, vector< vector<int> > vec)
{
    int rulearray[32] = { 0 };
    for (int pos = 31; pos >= 0; --pos){
        if (r % 2) 
            rulearray[pos] = 1;
        r /= 2;
    }
    int arraya[32] = {0};
    int arrayb[32] = {0};
    for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
        arraya[i] = vec[0][i];
        arrayb[i] = vec[1][i];
    }

    vector< vector<int> > output;
    typedef int t_array[32];
    t_array vll, vl, vr, vrr, vx;

    rotate_copy(arrayb,arrayb+2,arrayb+32,vll);
    rotate_copy(arrayb,arrayb+1,arrayb+32,vl);    
    rotate_copy(arrayb,arrayb+31,arrayb+32,vr);    
    rotate_copy(arrayb,arrayb+30,arrayb+32,vrr);


    for (int i = 0; i < 32; i++) {
        vx[i] = (arraya[i] + rulearray[(31 - (vll[i] + (2 * vl[i]) 
                                           + (4 * arrayb[i]) + (8 * vr[i]) + (16 * vrr[i])))]) % 2;
    }

    output.push_back(vector<int>(arrayb, arrayb+32));
    output.push_back(vector<int>(vx, vx+32));

    return (output);

}

int caevolve ( long int r, vector< vector<int> > vector ){
    int count;
    for(int j=0; j<20; j++){ 
        //run function
        vector = ca2step(r, vector);
    }
    if (vector[0] == va || vector[1] == va) {
        count = 1;
        }
    else{
        count=0;
    }
    return (count);
}

int main ()
{
    vector< vector<int> > vinput;
    vinput.reserve(32);
    vinput.push_back(va);
    vinput.push_back(vb); 
    int counter = 0;

    for(unsigned long long int i=0;i<4294967295;i++){  //4294967295
        counter += caevolve(i, vinput);
        }

    cout<< "Counter : " << counter << endl;

    return 0;

}
share|improve this question
    
Just in case: IO (e.g. cout especially with endl) also has a large cost and should be avoided in algorithms in production. –  pmr Jul 20 '12 at 16:32
1  
What is ca2step supposed to accomplish? My immediate reaction would be to eliminate the rotate_copys if at all possible. At least right off, it looks like leaving the vector alone, and using a % in the subscript could avoid quite a bit of copying. –  Jerry Coffin Jul 20 '12 at 16:33
    
Should if (vinput[0] == va | vinput[1] == va) { be changed into if (vinput[0] == va || vinput[1] == va) { ? –  timrau Jul 20 '12 at 16:48
    
pmr - I'll avoid cout, I was just using that to make sure the data I was getting correct, thanks! jerry - ca2step calculates the next step of a 2nd order cellular automata with for a given rule and 2 initial configurations. timrau - I think | is the OR operator? –  Richard Wells Jul 20 '12 at 17:58
    
@RichardWells -- No. | is the bit-wise OR operator. As @timrau indicated || is what you want. –  Happy Green Kid Naps Jul 20 '12 at 18:40

10 Answers 10

Aside from C++ performance, you should consider to parallelize the code and take advantage of multicore architectures . It seems to me that your problem is a classical example to do this.

share|improve this answer

Jack has correctly identified that the memory allocation inside the vectors can be a substantial cost. So move the vectors outside the loop, and simply clear() them instead of creating brand new ones.

This will save at least one allocation/deallocation per vector per iteration.

Don't pass vectors by value, instead use const vector<vector<int>>& as the parameter type for ca2step. This will save a whole bunch of vector copies (and memory allocation and deallocation) for each iteration of the inside loop, which is a whole lot.

Inside ca2step, use stack arrays (maybe std::array) instead of vectors. That saves even more dynamic memory allocation. begin(arrayb) will work for both arrays and vectors (instead of arrayb.begin()).

share|improve this answer
    
I just tried your first suggestion but can't seem to get it to work, it returns a segmentation fault. I put the vinput.clear(); in the bottom of the for loop. is that correct? –  Richard Wells Jul 20 '12 at 16:44

Instrument/profile and run your code for say hundred thousand or one million iterations. Identify the parts of your code where substantial execution time is spent. Try and improve the performance of those portions. Repeat. Only when you are satisfied that you can improve no further, should you attempt to run it more than four billion times.

share|improve this answer

there are too many array accessing. You need a prefetch or more locals to represent those refetched array elements. Cache-friendly. Here read this

http://www.research.scea.com/research/pdfs/GDC2003_Memory_Optimization_18Mar03.pdf

share|improve this answer

Move all your vectors outside your ca2step function; make them even global variables. Use vector::reserve() to extend their size before you start push_back()ing into them, you know all the sizes. Since ca2step will now work on arrays that are external to it, it doesn't need to return anything, so no need for vectors-of-two-vectors; just use those two vectors directly, and when you're done, just vector::clear() them.

Also you might need to change your loop variable type to unsigned long or unsigned long long.

share|improve this answer

This should be done by the compiler to some extent. In your case you should try parallelizing your code.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the suggestion, but I don't really know what that is? Do you know anywhere that will explain this better? –  Richard Wells Jul 21 '12 at 1:31

You could use a LinkedList instead of a vector. LinkedLists have faster insertion (push_back for vectors) since they never need to resize themselves, which, at large numbers, can be a costly operation.

share|improve this answer
    
But they have poor locality. –  Ben Voigt Jul 20 '12 at 16:28
    
This is almost always wrong. vector tries to minimize the amount of resizing and will not often resize (especially at large sizes). list however will be a lot slower to iterate over. –  pmr Jul 20 '12 at 16:28
    
Does linkedlist allow rotation? I also need a vector of vectors because the output from the function ca2step needs to be two vectors (or lists or whatever) so thats how I worked around getting two outputs from the function. Is this possible with linked list too? –  Richard Wells Jul 20 '12 at 16:31

I think you could get rid of the initial loop to fill rulearray, replacing with bit testing on r: to test the nth bit, you can use

(r & (1 << nth)) ? 1 : 0 ...

then usage of rulearray could be replaced by

arraya[i] + (r & (1 << (31 - (vll[i] + (2 * vl[i]) + (4 * arrayb[i]) + (8 * vr[i]) + (16 * vrr[i])) ?  1 : 0)

rotate_copy can be used with plain old arrays: and you can avoid much dynamic memory allocation using that, because all sizes are fixed. Enforce this using a typedef:

 typedef int t_array[32];
 t_array arraya, arrayb, vll, vl, vr, vrr, vx;

 rotate_copy(arrayb,arrayb+2,arrayb+32,vll);
 rotate_copy(arrayb,arrayb+1,arrayb+32,vl);    
 rotate_copy(arrayb,arrayb+31,arrayb+32,vr);    
 rotate_copy(arrayb,arrayb+30,arrayb+32,vrr);

Then just the final return value need a copy of the stack allocated arrays:

  output.push_back(vector<int>(arrayb,arrayb+32));
  output.push_back(vector<int>(vx,vx+32));
share|improve this answer
    
hi, thanks for your help! I can't seem to get your second line to work for some reason? –  Richard Wells Jul 20 '12 at 18:30
    
I didn't compile, so there could be a typo...Any error message to check? –  CapelliC Jul 20 '12 at 19:55

thanks for all the help, I've finally got this working in a reasonable time (approx 11 hours). Just thought I'd share my code. I will need to run this several times in the next few weeks, so if there are any other tricks i could use to get the time down further, suggestions would be appreciated!

    #include <iostream>
using namespace std;

bool is_equal ( int a[], int b[]){
    for (int i=0; i<32; i++ ){
        if ( a[i] != b[i] )
            return false;
    }
    return true;
}

int ca2step (long long int rule, int arraya[32], int arrayb[32] ){
    int count =0;
    int x[32];
    int y[32];
    for(int i=0;i<32;i++){
        x[i] = arraya[i];
        y[i] = arrayb[i];
    }

    for (int j=0; j<19;j++){
            int arrayc[32];
            for (int i=0; i<32; i++){
            arrayc[i] = (x[i] + ((rule >> ( y[(i+2)%32] + (2 * y[(i+1)%32]) + 
                   (4 * y[i]) + (8 * y[(i+31)%32]) + (16 * y[(i+30)%32])) )& 1))%2;
            }

            for(int k=0;k<32;k++){ 
                x[k] = y[k];
                y[k] = arrayc[k];}
    }

    if(is_equal(y, arraya) || is_equal(y, arrayb)){
        count++;}  
    return(count);     
}

int main (){
    int a[32] = {0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 
                 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1};
    int b[32] = {1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1,
                 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1};
    int counter = 0;
    for(long long int i=0;i<10000000;i++){  //4294967295
        counter += ca2step(i, a, b);
        }

    cout << counter ;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

I passed by this thread and have a look at the problem. But it has been quite a while. Anyway, I have given it a try using some bitwise operators and openmp.

My assumptions: 1. processing of binary numbers 2. all 32 bits

I have replaced all the arrays by a single int, because your 32 wide array containing only '0' and '1' fits just nice into one int(4 bytes). Doing this helps you eliminate a few loops and save memory accesses.

Updated* learnt some new tricks, updated with some minimal assembly code

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

#define MASK 0x1F  /*last 5 bits*/

unsigned int toInt(int a[32]){
    int result = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i<32;i++)  
    if(a[i]==1) result |= 1 << (31-i);
    return result;
}

inline unsigned int ror(unsigned int v,unsigned int sh){
//rotate v to the right by sh
    asm("ror %1,%0;" :"=r"(v) : "cI"(sh), "0"(v) );
    return v;
}

unsigned int compute(unsigned int rule, unsigned int target){
    unsigned int t = rol(target,3);
    unsigned int d = 0;
    unsigned int k;
    for(int i=0;i<32;i++){
        k  = ( t & MASK );
        d |= ( (rule>>k) & 1 ) << (31-i) ;
        t  =  rol(t,1);      
    }
    return d;
}

int ca2step (unsigned int rule, unsigned int a, unsigned int b ){
    unsigned int xx = a;
    unsigned int yy = b;

    int tmp;
    unsigned int d,tmpyy;

    for (int j=0; j<19;j++){
        d = compute(rule,yy); 
        tmpyy = xx ^ d ;
        xx = yy;
        yy = tmpyy;
    }
    return ( yy == a || yy == b ) ;  
}    

int main (){

    int a[32] = {0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 
                 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1};
    int b[32] = {1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 1, 1,
                 0, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1};
    int counter = 0;
    unsigned int aa = toInt(a);
    unsigned int bb = toInt(b);

    #pragma omp parallel for reduction(+:counter)
    for(unsigned int i=0;i < 0xffffffff ;i++){
        counter += ca2step(i, aa, bb);
    }

    cout << counter <<"\n";

    return 0;
}

compile with:

g++ filename.cpp -O3 -fopenmp
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.