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I am finding it tuff with enums. This is an example from Kathy Siera book :

    public class WeatherTest {

    static Weather w;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.print(w.RAINY.count + " " + w.Sunny.count + " ");
    }
}

enum Weather {

    RAINY, Sunny;
    int count = 0;

    Weather() {
        System.out.print("c ");
        count++;
    }
}

The output is c c 1 1. Understood. Now I thought what if the count field was static? Would the output be c c 2 2 ? Based on it, I modified the count variable to static. But then what I see is this : Compile Time Error : Illegal reference to static field from initializer.

Searching on net I found this was some kind of a loop-hole by Sun and it allows static methods that can change static fields. Ok.. So now I use a static method incr to do my job :

     class WeatherTest {

    static Weather w;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.print(w.RAINY.count + " " + w.Sunny.count + " ");
    }
}

enum Weather {

    RAINY, Sunny;

    Weather() {
        System.out.print("c ");
        incr();
    }
    static int count = 0;

    static void incr() {
        count++;
    }
}

To my surprise, I get the output : c c 0 0 ! Can anyone please explain this behaviour to me before I shoot myself?

share|improve this question
    
Please fix your indentation and braces. –  ardentsonata Jul 20 '12 at 16:35
    
Extremely tuff question! All Java Programmers, Armour yourself :) –  Kameron Jul 20 '12 at 16:36
    
ardentsonata : Sure –  user1500024 Jul 20 '12 at 16:36
    
Before doing anything please visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 20 '12 at 16:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Enum values can be thought of as glorified static fields ( they are under the covers ).

So, if your Weather were a regular Java class, it would have been something like this:

 class Weather {
   public final static Weather RAINY = new Weather( );
   public final static Weather Sunny = new Weather( );

   static int count = 0;

   Weather( ) {
     System.out.print("c ");
     incr();
   }

   static void incr()
   {
      count++;
   }
 }

You can see that count is declared AFTER both enum values, that means it is also initialized after both values are created. Also, each function call that encounters uninitialized static variable treats it as initialized with default value ( for int it's 0).

Because you never call incr after count has been properly initialized, you see its value as still 0

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with sequence of execution, but one part confused my while executing this code is, on second call, incr() method showing count as '2'. As per your theory it should show count as ZERO, isn't it? –  Nambari Jul 20 '12 at 16:49
    
I am partially clear; can u please explain more on what happens when incr() is encountered in the Weather() constructor? Why doesn't it result into some kind of Compiler Error or Exception since We are trying to increment a value that is yet not even initialized ? –  user1500024 Jul 20 '12 at 16:51
    
@thinksteep. On a first call to incr count is uninitialized, so that memory location is assigned default value of 0. Then it's incremented 2 times by constructors, then REAL initialization to 0 occur. –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Jul 20 '12 at 16:52
    
Ahh! I see after two increments, the statement "static int count=0" executes and sets it to ZERO again. Make sense. –  Nambari Jul 20 '12 at 16:55
    
@AlexanderPogrebnyak Got it Sir. You saved me ;) –  user1500024 Jul 20 '12 at 16:57

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