Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to be pointed in the right direction for this problem I'm working on:

Let's say I'm reading output from a C program as follows:

while True:
    ln = p.stdout.readline()
    if '' == ln:
        break
    #do stuff here with ln

And my output looks like this line for line:

TrnIq: Thread on CPU 37
TrnIq: Thread on CPU 37 but will be moved to CPU 44
IP-Thread on CPU 33
FANOUT Thread on CPU 37
Filter-Thread on CPU 38 but will be moved to CPU 51
TRN TMR Test 2 Supervisor Thread on CPU 34
HomographyWarp Traking Thread[0] on CPU 26

I want to capture "TrnIq: Thread on" and "37" as 2 separate variables: a string and a number from output "TrnIq: Thread on CPU 37".

Its pretty well the same for the other lines to, for example capture "HomographyWarp Traking Thread[0] on" and the # "26" from "HomographyWarp Traking Thread[0] on CPU 26".

The only real challenge is for lines like this: "Filter-Thread on CPU 38 but will be moved to CPU 51" on this line I need "Filer-Thread" and the # "51" not the first # "38".

Python has so many different ways to do this I dont even know where to start!

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
"Thanks" for unaccaptance... –  Ωmega Jul 24 '12 at 20:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

regex seems like overkill to me here. [Disclaimer: I don't like regular expressions, but do like Python, so where possible I write in Python, and don't write regular expressions. For reasons I've never fully understood this is considered surprising.]

s = """TrnIq: Thread on CPU 37
TrnIq: Thread on CPU 37 but will be moved to CPU 44
IP-Thread on CPU 33
FANOUT Thread on CPU 37
Filter-Thread on CPU 38 but will be moved to CPU 51
TRN TMR Test 2 Supervisor Thread on CPU 34
HomographyWarp Traking Thread[0] on CPU 26"""

for line in s.splitlines():
    words = line.split()
    if not ("CPU" in words and "on" in words): continue # skip uninteresting lines
    prefix_words = words[:words.index("on")+1]
    prefix = ' '.join(prefix_words)
    cpu = int(words[-1])
    print (prefix, cpu)

gives

('TrnIq: Thread on', 37)
('TrnIq: Thread on', 44)
('IP-Thread on', 33)
('FANOUT Thread on', 37)
('Filter-Thread on', 51)
('TRN TMR Test 2 Supervisor Thread on', 34)
('HomographyWarp Traking Thread[0] on', 26)

and I don't think I need to translate any of this code into English.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes! Even I can understand it just by looking at it! Much simpler than regular expressions! but which way is more efficient in you opinion? –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 17:22
    
What's efficiency? I think of it as something like a measure of total time -- time writing, time debugging, time running, time modifying it to handle a case I didn't predict -- to get the output I need. Regexps will usually (not always) win on performance. I think they only win on the code side for use cases I seldom find myself in -- a little too complex for basic tools and not complex enough to justify using a real parser -- but opinions and situations vary. –  DSM Jul 20 '12 at 17:36
    
I keep getting an error on "on" not being found? –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 17:47
    
That's because there's a line you're reading in your real case that doesn't contain the word "on", even though every example line you gave has one. What is the line in question? (Just add print line inside the loop.) –  DSM Jul 20 '12 at 17:50
    
while True: s = p.stdout.readline() if '' == s: break for line in s.splitlines(): words = line.split() prefix_words = words[:words.index("on")+1] prefix = ' '.join(prefix_words) cpu = int(words[-1]) print (prefix, cpu) –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 18:06

The following should return a tuple of the information assuming ln is a single line of your data (edited to include converting the CPU value to an int):

match = re.match(r'(.*?)(?: on CPU.*)?(?: (?:on|to) CPU )(.*)', ln).groups()
if match:
    proc, cpu = match.groups()
    cpu = int(cpu)

Example:

>>> import re
>>> for ln in lines:
...     print re.match(r'(.*?)(?: on CPU.*)?(?: (?:on|to) CPU )(.*)', ln).groups()
... 
('TrnIq: Thread', '37')
('TrnIq: Thread', '44')
('IP-Thread', '33')
('FANOUT Thread', '37')
('Filter-Thread', '51')
('TRN TMR Test 2 Supervisor Thread', '34')
('HomographyWarp Traking Thread[0]', '26')

Explanation:

(.*?)          # capture zero or more characters at the start of the string,
               #   as few characters as possible
(?: on CPU.*)? # optionally match ' on CPU' followed by any number of characters,
               #   do not capture this
(?: (?:on|to) CPU )  # match ' on CPU ' or ' to CPU ', but don't capture
(.*)           # capture the rest of the line

Rubular: http://www.rubular.com/r/HqS9nGdmbM

share|improve this answer
    
So this will return a tuple containing 2 strings for each line? If I wanted to convert the #s to strings, does python have a strToNum function? –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 17:07
    
@NASAIntern - You could change the .* at the end to \d+ so that instead of grabbing the rest of the line you are sure that you only grab digits. Then you can just use the int() built-in function to convert the strings to numbers. –  Andrew Clark Jul 20 '12 at 17:13
    
Why the downvote? –  Andrew Clark Jul 20 '12 at 17:27
1  
No idea why you're downvoted, your answer is correct and well explained. +1. This is super minor, but it might be nice to have an import re line somewhere in your code, just to add a bit of clarity. –  Nolen Royalty Jul 20 '12 at 17:33
1  
@NASAIntern - re.match() returns a MatchObject, and MatchObject.groups() returns a tuple of the captured groups from the regex. The proc, cpu = ... is called sequence unpacking, and is basically the same as groups = re.match(...).groups(); proc = groups[0]; cpu = groups[1]. –  Andrew Clark Jul 20 '12 at 17:35

It can be done pretty simply with two regex searches:

import re

while True:
    ln = p.stdout.readline()
    if '' == ln:
        break

    start_match = re.search(r'^(.*?) on', ln)
    end_match = re.search(r'(\d+)$', ln)
    process = start_match and start_match.group(0)
    process_number = end_match and end_match.group(0)
share|improve this answer
    
Can you provide some detail on this? I'm still getting used to python's syntax for this kinda stuff? –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 17:05
    
You can read through Python's Regular Expression module documentation: docs.python.org/library/re.html –  mVChr Jul 20 '12 at 17:20
    
I get the regular expressions, just not the "and" and match.group() functions. matchgroup() returns a string right? –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 17:32
    
Ah, the and is in case no match is found. group() will return any specified capture groups as strings, in this case since we only have one we call group(0). –  mVChr Jul 20 '12 at 18:09
    
I guess I should have clarified the fact that these are just the output lines I am interested in. There are thousands of other lines: `process_trn_ip_rslts: Switching to TRN_FILTER_PROPAGATING state. trn_filter: total_update_timer = 0.057454 seconds. trn_ib->trn_ib_state.ip_part=1 DISPOSITION ACCEPT VALUE = 2 -a *_000004.pgm Disposition ACCEPT frame 4 sent to socket 6 TrnIb: Sending image id=(1003080551, 750074, framecnt 4) to IP via socket=8 from IB. open_sock/bind OK, sock=79 create_cmd_sock/listen OK, erc=0 trn_filter, instance 3: socket_from_cmd: 35~ –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 18:17

So use regex ^(.*?)\s+on\s+CPU.*(?<=\sCPU)\s+(\d+)\s*$

import sys
import re

for ln in sys.stdin:
  m = re.match(r'^(.*?)\s+on\s+CPU.*(?<=\sCPU)\s+(\d+)\s*$', ln); 
  if m is not None:
    print m.groups();

See and test the example here.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess I should have clarified the fact that these are just the output lines I am interested in. There are thousands of other lines: process_trn_ip_rslts: Switching to TRN_FILTER_PROPAGATING state. trn_filter: total_update_timer = 0.057454 seconds. trn_ib->trn_ib_state.ip_part=1 DISPOSITION ACCEPT VALUE = 2 -a *_000004.pgm Disposition ACCEPT frame 4 sent to socket 6 TrnIb: Sending image id=(1003080551, 750074, framecnt 4) to IP via socket=8 from IB. open_sock/bind OK, sock=79 create_cmd_sock/listen OK, erc=0 trn_filter, instance 3: socket_from_cmd: 35 –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 18:18
    
@NASAIntern - If you need print entire lines, just replace print m.groups(); with print ln; – Ωmega 5 mins ago –  Ωmega Jul 20 '12 at 18:39

In the case you mention, you always want the second CPU number, so it can be done with a single regexp:

# Test program
import re

lns = [
    "TrnIq: Thread on CPU 37",
    "TrnIq: Thread on CPU 37 but will be moved to CPU 44",
    "IP-Thread on CPU 33",
    "FANOUT Thread on CPU 37",
    "Filter-Thread on CPU 38 but will be moved to CPU 51",
    "TRN TMR Test 2 Supervisor Thread on CPU 34",
    "HomographyWarp Traking Thread[0] on CPU 26"
]

for ln in lns:
    test    = re.search("(?P<process>.*Thread\S* on).* CPU (?P<cpu>\d+)$", ln)
    print "%s: '%s' on CPU #%s" % ( ln, test.group('process'), test.group('cpu'))

In the general case maybe you want to distinguish between cases (e.g. thread on a CPU, moved thread, subthread...). To do this, you can employ several re.search()es one after another. For example:

# This search recognizes lines of the form "...Thread on CPU so-and-so", and
# also lines that add "...but will be moved to CPU some-other-cpu".
test = re.search("(?P<process>.* Thread) on CPU (?P<cpu1>\d+)( but will be moved to CPU (?P<cpu2>\d+))*", ln)
if test:
   # Here we capture Process Thread, both moved and non moved
   if test.group('cpu2'):
       # We have process, cpu1 and cpu2: moved thread
   else:
       # Nonmoved task, we have test.group('process') and cpu1.
else:
   # No match, try some other regexp. For example processes with a thread number
   # between square brackets: "Thread[0]", which are not captured by the regex above.
   test = re.search("(?P<process>.*) Thread[(?P<thread>\d+)] on CPU (?P<cpu1>)", ln)
   if test:
       # Here we have Homography Traking in process, 0 in thread, 26 in cpu1

For optimum performance, tests for lines that occur more frequently are best done first.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure I understand the 2nd part in "You can then do this with several re.search(). For example:" What would I use this for? –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 18:07
    
I guess I should have clarified the fact that these are just the output lines I am interested in. There are thousands of other lines: process_trn_ip_rslts: Switching to TRN_FILTER_PROPAGATING state. trn_filter: total_update_timer = 0.057454 seconds.trn_ib->trn_ib_state.ip_part=1 DISPOSITION ACCEPT VALUE = 2 -a *_000004.pgm Disposition ACCEPT frame 4 sent to socket 6 TrnIb: Sending image id=(1003080551, 750074, framecnt 4) to IP via socket=8 from IB. open_sock/bind OK, sock=79 create_cmd_sock/listen OK, erc=0 trn_filter, instance 3: socket_from_cmd: 35 –  NASA Intern Jul 20 '12 at 18:23
    
OK, then for every ln you read, you check it against one of several regexp's using re.search(). The first .search I supplied recognizes lines like "... Thread... on... CPU". The other searches are more targeted and a bit more efficient. If you have a very common line you're NOT interested in, you might also try to recognize it in order to discard it and save the subsequent comparisons. –  lserni Jul 20 '12 at 21:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.