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See the app has two buttons. One starts a thirty second timer and the other a sixty second timer. There are no problems starting the timer. The problem is, say I've clicked the 60 second button and then immediately the 30 second button, the textview switches between counting down from 60 to 0 and 30 to 0. It goes 59 28 57 26 and so on..What I want to know is, suppose I click 60 sec first and then hit the 30 sec button, I want the 60 sec countdown canceled and the 30 second one to start.

Here's my code. I'm posting only the relevant bit.

[EDIT] I've posted the entire code now.

package com.android.tapme;
import android.app.Activity;
import android.os.Bundle;
import android.os.CountDownTimer;
import android.view.View;
import android.widget.Button;
import android.widget.TextView;

public class TapMe extends Activity {

private int countValue = 0, psuedoCountValue = 0;
private TextView textView1;
private TextView textView2;
Button tapButton;
Button sixty_seconds;
Button thirty_seconds;
private boolean thirtyon=false, sixtyon=false;
boolean timeUp=false;
@Override
public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
    setContentView(R.layout.activity_tap_me);
    tapButton= (Button) findViewById(R.id.tapButton);
    textView1 = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView1);
    textView1.setTextSize(40);
    textView2 = (TextView) findViewById(R.id.textView2);
    textView2.setTextSize(20);
    thirty_seconds = (Button) findViewById(R.id.thirty_seconds);
    sixty_seconds= (Button) findViewById(R.id.sixty_seconds);
    sixty_seconds.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
              public void onClick(View v) {
                  timeUp=false;
                  countValue=0;
                  sixtyon=true;
                  checkTapValue();
                  MyCount myCount=new MyCount(60000,1000);
                  if(thirtyon==true)
                  {
                      myCount.cancel();
                  }
                  myCount=new MyCount(60000,1000);
                  thirtyon=false;
                  myCount.start();
            }
            });
    thirty_seconds.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            public void onClick(View v) {
                timeUp=false;
                countValue=0;
                thirtyon=true;
                checkTapValue();
                MyCount myCount=new MyCount(30000,1000);
                if(sixtyon==true)
                {
                    myCount.cancel();
                }
                myCount=new MyCount(30000,1000);
                sixtyon=false;
                myCount.start();
      }
    });
}
private void checkTapValue() {
    tapButton.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
        public void onClick(View v) {
            if(timeUp==false)
            {
            countValue++;
            textView1.setText(Integer.toString(countValue));
            }
            else if(timeUp==true)
            {
            psuedoCountValue=countValue;
            textView1.setText(Integer.toString(psuedoCountValue));
            }
        }
    });

}
public void disable_Button()
{       
    timeUp=true;
    psuedoCountValue=countValue;
}

class MyCount extends CountDownTimer {
    public MyCount(long millisInFuture, long countDownInterval) {
        super(millisInFuture, countDownInterval);
    }
    @Override
    public void onFinish() {
        disable_Button();
        textView2.setText("Time's up!");
    }

    @Override
    public void onTick(long millisUntilFinished) {
        System.out.println(millisUntilFinished);
        textView2.setText("" + (int) (millisUntilFinished / 1000));
    }
}
}
share|improve this question
    
You should rise your accept rate please. –  BrainCrash Jul 20 '12 at 16:59

2 Answers 2

You're not keeping a reference to the current myCount. What you're doing right now is creating a new one (that hasn't even been started) and then cancel that.

It should look something like this:

public class TapMe extends Activity {

    // all other fields

    private MyCount currentCount;

    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {

        // code...

        sixty_seconds.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            public void onClick(View v) {
                timeUp=false;
                countValue=0;
                sixtyon=true;
                checkTapValue();
                if (currentCount != null) {
                    currentCount.cancel();
                }
                currentCount=new MyCount(60000,1000);
                thirtyon=false;
                currentCount.start();
            }
        );

        // code...

    }    

    // the rest of the code

}
share|improve this answer
    
I've posted the entire code. –  Torcellite Jul 20 '12 at 17:06
    
Updated the answer. –  Marcus Forsell Stahre Jul 20 '12 at 17:22
    
Nope, didn't work. –  Torcellite Jul 21 '12 at 8:11
    
I didn't type the updated code for the thirty-second-counter, but it should be changed in the same way. –  Marcus Forsell Stahre Jul 21 '12 at 12:01
up vote 0 down vote accepted

@Marcus Although your answer wasn't the correct one, in essence it was.

I just had to create two separate objects and cancel one of them if the other was activated.

                      if(thirtyCount!=null)
                  {
                      thirtyCount.cancel();
                  }
                  sixtyCount.start();

This is the solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Pretty sure my solution is correct - since you only run one counter at any time, it should be enough to just store one object. –  Marcus Forsell Stahre Jul 21 '12 at 12:00

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