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var refreshId_hxlatestposts = setInterval(function() {
var el = $("#hxlatestposts");
var req = $.get("example.php");
el.fadeOut('slow', function () {
    req.done(function( data ){
        el.html(data).fadeIn('slow');
    });
});
}, 60000);

This is what i use to refresh a div every minute, sometimes it gets hung up when the site it is getting the feed from is down or something. I'd like to some how have a timeout so if it cannot load the php file in X seconds then return 'Fail to load'.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

jQuery documentation (.ajaxSetup()) suggests using .ajaxSetup() to set the value for timeout, instead of using it in individual requests.

You can use request.fail() to register a function in case of a failed request.

$.ajaxSetup({
    timeout: 5000
});

var refreshId_hxlatestposts = setInterval(function() {
    var el = $("#hxlatestposts");
    var req = $.get("example.php");
    el.fadeOut('slow', function() {
        req.done(function(data) {
            el.html(data).fadeIn('slow');
        });
        req.fail(function(jqXHR, textStatus) {
            el.html('Fail to load').fadeIn('slow');
        });
    });
}, 60000);
share|improve this answer
    
If i was to use X of this code snipped would i only have to to put ajaxSetup once at the top of the JS file? Nevermind i guess i should of read the documentation. All subsequent Ajax calls using any function will use the new settings, unless overridden by the individual calls, until the next invocation of $.ajaxSetup(). –  Keelan Jul 20 '12 at 20:33

Nice use of deferred objects.

If you replace $.get with $.ajax, you can add a timeout.

var req = $.ajax({
    url: "example.php",
    type: "GET",
    timeout: 5000 // 5 seconds
});

and then add a fail handler

req.done(function(){...}).fail(function(){ 
    alert("failed to load"); 
});
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You'll want to check the status of the incoming response to ensure that the service returned a 200 Ok status. This is more reliable than just waiting for a timeout-- you will know if it's good data or not an can decide to retry by putting your timeout in the complete functions.

   $.ajax({
    //...        
    success: function(data, textStatus, xhr) {
        console.log(xhr.status);
        //handle status codes etc.
        // then set your timeout

    },
    complete: function(xhr, textStatus) {
        console.log(xhr.status);
        //handle status codes etc.
         // then set your timeout

    },

    // OR

    fail: function( xhr, textStatus ){
        //retry code or timeout
    }

    });
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jQuery's $.get is just a shorthand for $.ajax, which is used when more flexibility is required (in your case, yes)

Replace $.get("example.php"); with: $.ajax({ type: "GET", url: "example.php", timeout: X*1000, }).done(function(data) { el.fadeOut('slow', function () { el.html(data).fadeIn('slow'); }); }, 60000); });

where X is number of seconds you would want it to wait (timeout)

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Sry, i made some edits to the new code, so you can replace the code below var el = $("#hxlatestposts"); –  A Person Jul 20 '12 at 18:30

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