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#include <memory>

class Base
{
    std::shared_ptr<Base> create() const; // Returns a default constructed object
}

Suppose, that all the members derived to whatever degree from Base are copy constructible and default constructible. I want the

std::shared_ptr<Base> create() const;

Method to create object of the appropriate dynamic type, but I do not want to use boilerplate code.

Is it possible to make

std::shared_ptr<Base> create() const;

Statically bound, but inside find somehow the correct type and create the object using Default constructor? Possibly using C++11.

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1  
A template? template <typename T> std::shared_ptr<Base> create () const { return new T (); }; p = create<Dervied1> ();. Maybe you could provide an example of how this might be used? –  Richard Corden Jul 20 '12 at 19:03
2  
What are you trying to do? –  rubenvb Jul 20 '12 at 19:07
    
In the big picture, I am trying to make a function that accepts a class name in the form of a string and returns a std::shared_ptr<Base> with the appropriate dynamic type. I would like to implement this usinga a static std::map<std::string, Base*> object –  Martin Drozdik Jul 20 '12 at 19:11
2  
@Martin: For your use case, static binding is not an option. You need either a virtual call or a function pointer. –  Ben Voigt Jul 20 '12 at 19:12
1  
@MartinDrozdik: Just a matter of style, your function should return a unique_ptr, since it's not yet being shared. –  GManNickG Jul 21 '12 at 1:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The create() functions should probably be static, as you don't have an instance yet. But without parameters you cannot do what you want... unless you use templates, of course:

class Base
{
public:
    template<typename T>
    static std::shared_ptr<Base> create() const
    {
        return std::shared<Base>(new T);
    }
};

Then use it this way:

std::shared_ptr<Base> ptr(Base::create<Foo>());

Or, if you prefer:

std::shared_ptr<Base> ptr(Foo::create<Foo>());
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Actually I have an instance. I have a std::shared_ptr<Base> object which points to an object of possibly different dynamic type than Base. Using this pointer I would like to request a default constructed specimen of the appropriate dynamic type. –  Martin Drozdik Jul 20 '12 at 19:16
    
Although this answer is not exactly what I was looking for, I trust Ben Voigt, that this is impossible. I will do it as you say. It actually solves my problem. –  Martin Drozdik Jul 20 '12 at 19:22
    
@Martin: I would argue that this answer doesn't get you anywhere. If you know the type you want to create, then you can easily create the shared_ptr --why call a function? Even with the function you need to specify two types: the one before ::create and the template parameter. Ugh as it is not needed! I would think you want to also handle the general case when you DON'T know any types except for the abstract base class --and for such this answer is (respectively) of little use. For example, how do you invoke create() with an iterator to list<shared_ptr<Base>>? –  Paul Preney Jul 20 '12 at 20:13

Ideally you have a static and perhaps a non-static create() functions. There is a clever way to accomplish this.

  1. Define a SuperBase class. It needs a virtual destructor and a pure virtual create() function. You'll use pointers/references to this class for normal late-binding OOP behaviours.

  2. Define a Base class template that inherits from SuperBase. Base's template parameter will be the type of the Derived class. Base will also have a traits class template with a static function called create(). This static create() function will create a default object with new. Using the trait's create() function, Base will define both a static_create() and the pure virtual SuperBase::create() functions.

  3. Implement Derived by inheriting from Base<Derived>.

One this is done, if you know you are using a derived type, then you can write Derived::create() to statically create a new one. If not, then you can always use an instance's create() method. Polymorphism is not broken since SuperBase would have the polymorphic interface you need/want --Base<D> is simply a helper class that auto defines the static_create() and create() functions so you would not normally use Base<D> directly.

Sample code appears below:

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

class SuperBase
{
  public:
    virtual ~SuperBase() = default;
    virtual std::shared_ptr<SuperBase> create() const = 0;
};

template <typename T>
struct Base_Traits
{
  static T* create()
  {
    return new T;
  }
};

template <typename Derived, typename Traits=Base_Traits<Derived>>
class Base : public SuperBase
{
  public:   
    // Define a static factory function...
    static std::shared_ptr<SuperBase> static_create()
    {
      return std::shared_ptr<SuperBase>{Traits::create()};
    }

    // Define pure virtual implementation...
    std::shared_ptr<SuperBase> create() const override
    {
      return static_create();
    }
};

class Derived : public Base<Derived>
{
};

int main()
{
  auto newone = Derived::static_create();  // Type known @ compile time
  auto anotherone = newone->create();      // Late binding; type not known @ compile time
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! I appreciate your approach! –  Martin Drozdik Jul 24 '12 at 21:12

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