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I am sure the answer to this is up somewhere, but I don't think I've been using the right search terms.

Here is my issue. I have multiple matrices (I will simplify to just two here), where each row is a uniquely labeled individual (some of which are shared between matrices, and some of which are not), and common column headings that are shared.

For example:

first<-matrix(rbinom(20,1,.5),4,5)
first[,1]=c(122,145,186,199)
colnames(first)<-c("ID",901,902,903,904)
first
      ID 901 902 903 904
[1,] 122   1   0   0   0
[2,] 145   0   0   0   1
[3,] 186   0   0   1   1
[4,] 199   1   0   0   0

second<-matrix(rbinom(30,1,.5),6,5)
second[,1]=c(122,133,142,151,186,199)
colnames(second)<-c("ID",901,902,903,904)
second
      ID 901 902 903 904
[1,] 122   0   1   1   1
[2,] 133   0   0   0   1
[3,] 142   1   1   0   1
[4,] 151   0   1   0   0
[5,] 186   1   0   1   1
[6,] 199   1   0   0   0

I would like to add 'first' and 'second' together based upon the 'ID' and column names. This should result in a matrix with 7 rows (since there are 4 IDs in the 'first' matrix, and 3 new and 3 old IDs in the 'second' matrix: "122,133,142,145,151,186,199"), and the same number of columns.

In this example, the result I would want would be:

      ID 901 902 903 904
[1,] 122   1   1   1   1
[2,] 133   0   0   0   1
[3,] 142   1   1   0   1
[4,] 145   0   0   0   1
[5,] 151   0   1   0   0
[6,] 186   1   0   2   2
[7,] 199   2   0   0   0
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was looking for a solution without a "for" loop using builtin functions without success. So here is my approach

set.seed(1) # make it reproducible
first <- matrix(rbinom(20,1,.5),4,5)
first[ ,1] <- c(122, 145, 186, 199)
colnames(first) <- c("ID", 901, 902, 903, 904)

second <- matrix(rbinom(30, 1, .5), 6, 5)
second[ ,1] <- c(122, 133, 142, 151, 186, 199)
colnames(second) <- c("ID", 901, 902, 903, 904)

first

      ID 901 902 903 904
[1,] 122   0   1   1   1
[2,] 145   1   0   0   1
[3,] 186   1   0   1   0
[4,] 199   1   0   0   1

second
      ID 901 902 903 904
[1,] 122   0   0   1   1
[2,] 133   0   0   0   1
[3,] 142   1   1   1   0
[4,] 151   0   1   1   0
[5,] 186   0   1   1   1
[6,] 199   1   0   1   1

## stack them rowise
mat <- rbind(first, second)

ind <- unique(mat[,"ID"])

result <- matrix(nrow = length(ind), ncol = 5)
result[,1] <- ind

for (i in seq_along(ind)) {
    result[i,-1] <- colSums(mat[mat[ ,"ID"] == ind[i], -1, drop = FALSE])
}
colnames(result) <- colnames(mat)

result
      ID 901 902 903 904
[1,] 122   0   1   2   2
[2,] 145   1   0   0   1
[3,] 186   1   1   2   1
[4,] 199   2   0   1   2
[5,] 133   0   0   0   1
[6,] 142   1   1   1   0
[7,] 151   0   1   1   0
share|improve this answer

Original answer

Building on the approach from @RYogi where you use rownames and colnames to describe your matrix, I propose the following:

res <- rbind(first,second)
res <- tapply(res, expand.grid(dimnames(res)), sum)

All rows which have equal rownames will be summed.

When using data frames

If your input is a data.frame, the above will not work, as a data.frame must not have any duplicate row names. Another approach wich works there as well this:

rowsum(rbind(first, second), c(rownames(first), rownames(second)))

This approach will work on matrices as well. As it only takes one line, you might consider it simpler. I guess it might be more efficient as well, as it is less general than tapply. You could adjust this solution to the data format from your question, where the identifiers are in a separate column:

rowsum(rbind(first, second)[,-1], c(first[,1], second[,1]))

Note that the result would still have named rows, not a column containing those names.

Funny thing is, I accidentially read about rowsum while looking for rowSums in a rather complicated approach for the data.frame version of this problem here. Lucky me.

Additional hints

If you find the resulting names Var1 and Var2 for the dimensions confusing, you can remove them using

names(dimnames(res)) <- NULL

If your data really is in the format you describe, with the row names in the first data column, you can change them to proper row names using these commands:

rownames(first) <- first[,1]
first <- first[,-1]
share|improve this answer
    
expand.grid works like magic. –  Ryogi Jul 20 '12 at 23:16
    
I'm not sure why, but when I used rbind on my real data set (where I used ID as the rownames), the duplicate rownames had a number appended at the end of them. For example, if ID# 165320128 showed up 3 times, one row would be '165320128', the next '1653201281', and the last '1653201282' –  user1399311 Jul 22 '12 at 18:01
1  
@user1399311, could it be your original data is stored in data frames instead of matrices? It appears that they exhibit the behaviour you describe, as duplicate row names aren't allowed for a data.frame. You could convert them matrices, but I'll edit my answer to provide a better solution. –  MvG Jul 22 '12 at 18:24

I set up your problem slightly differently:

first <- matrix(rbinom(16,1,.5),4,4)
rownames(first) <- c(122,145,186,199)
colnames(first) <- c(901,902,903,904)

second <- matrix(rbinom(24,1,.5),6,4)
rownames(second) <- c(122,133,142,151,186,199)
colnames(second) <- c(901,902,903,904)

The matrices now have named rownames

> first
    901 902 903 904
122   1   0   0   1
145   1   0   0   0
186   0   0   1   1
199   1   0   1   1
> second
    901 902 903 904
122   1   1   0   0
133   0   0   1   1
142   1   0   1   0
151   1   0   1   1
186   0   1   0   1
199   0   0   0   0

Now it is easy to do set operations on the row names:

SumOnID <- function(A, B){
  rnA <- rownames(A)
  rnB <- rownames(B)

  ls.id <- list(ids = intersect(rnA, rnB), #shared indices
                idA = setdiff(rnA, rnB),   #only in A
                idB = setdiff(rnB, rnA))   #only in B

  do.call(rbind, 
    lapply(names(ls.id), function(x){
      if (x == "ids") return(A[x,, drop = F] + B[x,, drop = F])
      if (x == "idA") return(A[x,, drop = F])
      if (x == "idB") return(B[x,, drop = F])
    }))
}

Lets try it:

> SumOnID(first, second)
    901 902 903 904
122   2   1   1   1
186   1   1   0   1
199   2   1   1   0
145   1   1   0   1
133   1   0   1   1
142   1   0   1   0
151   1   1   1   1
share|improve this answer

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