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I have a sql view. Example is below. The problem is that I want to use all of the fields but I do not want to group by every field. How can I circumvent that? I only need to group on fieldA, but not the others...actually grouping with the others messes up the data I want to see. I'm using SQL Server 2008. Thanks!

select 
fieldA,
fieldB,
fieldC,
fieldD,
....
from my_table as a join other_table b on a.id=b.id
group by fieldA, fieldB, fieldC, fieldD
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1  
You only use GROUP BY when using an aggregate function like SUM, COUNT, MIN, MAX, etc. Do you mean ORDER BY? –  Ken Keenan Jul 20 '12 at 19:00
1  
Can you provide more details on what you are trying to do? Possibly post some sample data. –  bluefeet Jul 20 '12 at 19:02
    
I think the answer below are sound ideas, but I'm wondering if it's the "messes up the data" part that's really causing you confusion. I don't think we know what you mean by that until we know what you're trying to accomplish. I'm starting to agree with the ORDER BY note above. –  shawnt00 Jul 20 '12 at 23:15
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3 Answers 3

Generally when I want to select several fields, and aggregate something based on just one of them, I'll perform the aggregate in a derived table and join to the table I want to select from like so:

select fieldA, thingYouWantToAggregate, fieldB, fieldC, fieldD
from my_table
inner join
(
    select fieldA, thingYouWantToAggregate
    from my_table
    group by fieldA

) rsAggregated on rsAggregated.fieldA = my_table.fieldA
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I was about to suggest the same approach. I guess other people didn't look at the sentence "actually grouping with the others messes up the data". Therefore joining appears to be better than an aggregate function. –  Farhan Jul 20 '12 at 19:22
    
Excellent solution –  HLGEM Jul 20 '12 at 20:38
    
If you're using 2008, CROSS APPLY and OUTER APPLY might also be useful. –  mikurski Jul 20 '12 at 21:35
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You need to use an aggregate function on the columns that you don't want to include in your group by. I usually use min

select 
  fieldA,
  min(fieldB),
  min(fieldC),
  min(fieldD),
....
from my_table as a join other_table b on a.id=b.id
group by fieldA
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How can you be sure the MIN will be accurate to use? After reading the sentence "actually grouping with the others messes up the data", a join seems to be a better approach. –  Farhan Jul 20 '12 at 19:23
    
This could mean that the fieldb, fieldc, etc come from differnt records and is NOT a good approach. –  HLGEM Jul 20 '12 at 20:37
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i really don't understand what you're looking for but i might as well throw it out there....

select distinct fieldA, ....
from table_name
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