Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a Java project I am coding I have ended up using methods that are overridden in constructors. Something like:

class SuperClass {
    SuperClass() {
        intialise();
    }

    protected void initialise() {
        //Do some stuff common to all subclasses
        methodA();
        methodB();
    }

    protected abstract void methodA();

    protected abstract void methodB();
}

class SubClass1() {
    SubClass() {
        super();
    }
    protected void methodA() { //Do something }
    protected void methodB() { //Do something }

}

class SubClass2() {
    SubClass() {
        super();
    }
    protected void methodA() { //Do something else }
    protected void methodB() { //Do something else}

}

I now realise, that although in my case it works fine, it is somewhat dangerous since SubClass methods are called on an object that has currently only been constructed as a SuperClass object (something that may be overlooked when new classes that extend SuperClass are added in the future). It also wouldn't work in c++ due to differences in how objects are created.

The only way I can think to get round this is to move the initialise method call down to the concrete classes constructor:

   class SuperClass {
    SuperClass() {            
    }

    protected void initialise() {
        methodA();
        methodB();
    }

    protected abstract void methodA();

    protected abstract void methodB();
}

class SubClass1() {
    SubClass() {
        super();
        initialise();
    }
    protected void methodA() { //Do something }
    protected void methodB() { //Do something }

}...

Is this the common way to over come this issue? It seems a shame (and easy to forget) that all further classes that extend SuperClass need to remember to call initialise().

I also found myself doing something similar in a more complicated situational that uses a Factory Method in a constructor, which is overridden in subclasses to decide which concrete class to implement. The only other way I can think to get round this and keep the design pattern as is, is to perhaps construct in a two phase process; i.e. construct with the bare minimum, and then call a second method to finish off the job.

share|improve this question
2  
While it's not usually advisable to call virtual methods from a constructor, if the purpose of those methods is initialization, the methods probably know that they can't rely on the object's state being fully realized (since that's their raison d'etre.) That being said, it's a common pattern to force consumers to invoke the init() method post-construction anyway, which avoids the issue entirely. –  dlev Jul 20 '12 at 19:07
    
Why do you need to do this? Can you extract the complex initialisation? How about a Builder, or even a hierarchy of Builders? –  Alan Stokes Jul 20 '12 at 23:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is really not a good idea as your Subclass will not be properly constructed when its methodA() and methodB() are called. That would be very confusing for people extending the class. Recommend you use an abstract init() instead, as suggested by dlev in his/her comment.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean like the option I pose in the question? I'm not sure what you mean by an 'abstract' init(), or how a consumer is forced to use it. –  JBradshaw Jul 20 '12 at 19:28
    
Either (A) do your option 2 or (B) half-construct and require an externally-visible init() method to be called before the object can be treated as fully constructed. Which option to take depends whether you envision having many subclasses (favors B) or many places where these objects are constructed (favors A). –  aetheria Jul 20 '12 at 19:41

I wonder if you're making things more complicated than they need to be.

In your example, the stuff done by each implementation of methodA could be moved to the constructor of the class that does the implementation. So instead of using SubClass::methodA, just move the logic into the SubClass constructor.

If you do this you gain clarity at the expense of some potentially hard to understand control over the order the various initialization bits get executed.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply; but, what if initialise() also did some other stuff that would be common to all classes that extend the superclass. The only differences being the respective behaviour of MethodA and methodB()? –  JBradshaw Jul 20 '12 at 19:36
    
Any common initialization can be in the base class's constructor rather than in initialize(). –  aetheria Jul 20 '12 at 19:56

Objects that need initialization as complex as this would really need to be created through factory methods. You do mention a factory, but being called from a constructor, so that doesn't sound like the straightforward approach, either. If you simply had a factory in the base class, publicly invisible constructors, and a mechanism to decide which concrete class to return, that factory would easily enforce the initialization policy.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.