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Consider this snippet:

class Foo
{
    public event Action Event;
    public void TriggerEvent()
    {
        if (Event != null) {
            Event();
        }
    }
}

static void Handler()
{
    Console.WriteLine("hi!");
}

static void Main()
{
    var obj = new Foo();
    obj.Event += Handler;
    obj.Event += Handler;
    obj.TriggerEvent();
    Console.WriteLine("---");
    obj.Event -= Handler;
    obj.TriggerEvent();
}

The output I get:

hi!
hi!
---
hi!

The last "hi!" was quite unexpected. To remove it I have to call Event -= Handler; one more time. But what if I don't know how many times handler was bound?

UPDATE: Would be interesting to know the reasons behind this a bit counterintuitive behavior: why doesn't -= remove all the instances?

UPDATE 2: I realized that I find this behavior counterintuitive because of the difference with jQuery.

var handler = function() { console.log('hi!'); }, obj = {};
$(obj).on("event", handler).on("event", handler).trigger("event");
console.log("---");
$(obj).off("event", handler).trigger("event");

Output:

hi!
hi!
---
share|improve this question
    
try this solution Removing Event Handlers using Reflection –  Pranay Rana Jul 20 '12 at 20:28
    
No, not from the publisher. –  thorn Jul 20 '12 at 20:38
    
@HenkHolterman done –  thorn Jul 20 '12 at 20:51
    
@thorn - They're different instances. They may look the same, but they're not. –  Ritch Melton Jul 20 '12 at 21:20
    
@RitchMelton But the -= operator doesn't care about their identities when it decides which one to remove. It just removes a first one that equals to its argument by value. –  thorn Jul 20 '12 at 21:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think I understand why you might consider your example to be counter-intuitive.

Consider this modification

var del = new Action(Handler);
obj.Event += del;
obj.Event += del;
obj.TriggerEvent();
Console.WriteLine("---");
obj.Event -= del;
obj.TriggerEvent();

It works exactly the same as yours, but why?

When you used

obj.Event += Handler

The compiler did something behind your back. It created a new instance of Action(Handler) three times (two add, one remove). In the modification we use exactly the same delegate object.

So the real question is: In your example, why did the remove even work? You're passing an object to remove that wasn't used to add. The answer is that delegates have value equality.

var del1 = new Action(Handler);
var del2 = new Action(Handler);
Console.WriteLine("Reference equal? {0}, Value equal? {1}", Object.ReferenceEquals(del1, del2), del1.Equals(del2));
// Reference equal? False, Value equal? True

So now you might be thinking, "Why were two event handlers added? Shouldn't there be only one since they are the same handler?"

The answer is, "No". A multi-cast delegate doesn't care if you add the same handler multiple times, it's not a set, it's a list.

When you removed one handler, it recognized that there are two identical handlers in its list and removed one of them.

share|improve this answer
    
I thought that 'reference equality' and 'identity equality' are the same thing. And that what you call 'identity equality' is called 'equality by value'. Where can I read up on these terms? –  thorn Jul 22 '12 at 9:51
    
@thorn I probably should have said "reference equality" and "value equality". msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd183752.aspx –  Tergiver Jul 23 '12 at 16:19

try this solution Removing Event Handlers using Reflection

or

 Delegate[] dellist = myEvent.GetInvocationList();
    foreach (Delegate d in v)
           myEvent-= (d as MyDelegate);//MyDelegate is type of delegate
share|improve this answer

Delegates combine all handlers that you assign to it. If you assign the same handler twice it will be called twice and has to be removed twice. I don't think this is counterintuitive.

If you have control over the class that defines the event you can use something like the following to remove all instances of a specific handler at once:

private Action _Event;

public event Action Event
{
    add
    {
        _Event += value;
    }
    remove
    {
        while (_Event != null && _Event.GetInvocationList().Contains(value))
        {
            _Event -= value;
        }
    }
}

If you do not have control over the event then you have to accept that the -= operator removes only one instance of the handler. This is by design of the language and can not be changed.

It is like adding the same string to a List<string> multiple times. If you want to remove all instances of that string you have to call the Remove method multiple times.

I would not recommend the above code if your Foo class will be used by others because it behaves different from any other class.

share|improve this answer

Delegates should be "wrapped" in events like instances fields are wrapped in properties. Then you can control them.

public class Test
{
    public class Foo
    {
        private Action _event;
        public event Action Event
        {
            add { _event += value; }
            remove { _event -= value; }
        }

        public void DoEvent()
        {
            if (_event != null)
                _event ();
        }

        public void ClearEvent()
        {
            _event = null;
        }
    }

    static void Handler() {
        Console.WriteLine("hi!");
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        var foo = new Foo();

        foo.Event += Handler;
        foo.Event += Handler;
        foo.DoEvent();
        Console.WriteLine("---");

        foo.ClearEvent();

        foo.DoEvent();

        Console.Read();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But I don't need to remove all handlers at all. Just a specific handler that can be bound multiple times. –  thorn Jul 20 '12 at 20:41
    
Actually, you don't need to do this. event Action MyEvent is equivalent to an auto-property, but allows you do access the field too. –  SLaks Jul 20 '12 at 21:55
Event = Delegate.RemoveAll(Event, handler);

Note that this is not thread-safe, and that it will only work within the class that declares the event.

share|improve this answer
    
I replaced Handler everywhere with var handler = new Action(Handler); for this to be compiled. And discovered that this line doesn't have any effect at all. –  thorn Jul 20 '12 at 20:37

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