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I have an application in which I need to display "pages" of data in a list. The basic idea is fairly common. The display shows a list of items and at the bottom of the display are some kind of controls that allow you to go to the next "page" of data.

All well and good. I have this working.

Following is the SQL in a view I am using to support the "next" behavior.

CREATE VIEW CampaignParticipants AS
SELECT  row_number() OVER (ORDER BY TPT.LastName, TPT.FirstName, TPT.DoB) AS RowNumber
        ,CGP.*
        ,TPT.*
FROM    tblCampaignGEDPush CGP
JOIN    tblParticipants TPT
ON      CGP.PartID = TPT.PartID

Here is how I use the VIEW

SELECT  *
FROM    CampaignParticipants
WHERE   RowNumber >= 0
AND     RowNumber <= 100

This simulates grabbing the "first page" of 100 results from the VIEW. Pages thru each set of results just peachy.

Great.. BUT:

As some of you that have dealt with this probably are aware, this is flawed. If I want to search on TPT.LastName like 'R%' and get the first set of results, I'm doomed.

I'm gonna want to start looking at RowNumber = 0, stop at RowNumber = 100, but the "R" results will probably be well outside that range. Upshot: list comes back empty.

And it gets stickier: the user wants to be able to "filter" on LastName, FirstName, DoB, Location, Phone, Zip, anything.

**edit: i can't really put the filter on the "inner" query, as it's in a view, and the filter can change arbitrarily

Anybody have any ideas how to get this result set have a row_number() on the filtered set of results?

share|improve this question
    
Okay Austin Powers why are you limiting your view? –  Grixxly Jul 20 '12 at 20:43
    
not sure i understand what you're asking –  horace Jul 20 '12 at 23:38

3 Answers 3

Something like this should do...

SELECT * FROM (
SELECT  *, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY LastName, FirstName, DoB) AS __RN
FROM    CampaignParticipants
WHERE   LastName LIKE 'R%') innerData WHERE __RN BETWEEN 1 and 100

However, you should be using the column names, not '*'. I don't know what your tables look like so I can't fill that in for you.

share|improve this answer
    
the problem with this solution is that it requires the filter to be inside the "inner" select. since i cannot predict how the filter will run between iterations, it gets sticky to do this in a view... as the other poster suggests, it's prolly a proc. was just trying to see if there was a clever one-liner out there. –  horace Jul 21 '12 at 0:14
    
You wouldn't do this in a view. You'd do it in a proc. And, if I'm not mistaken, this is 'one line' - i.e. a single statement. I personally wouldn't put the ROW_NUMBER() in the view anyway - because you don't know whether the output would be filtered or not. Which is, I guess, why you are asking this question. –  Matt Whitfield Jul 21 '12 at 18:31
    
[Which is, I guess, why you are asking this question]... exactamundo –  horace Jul 22 '12 at 20:38

First of all try to use the proc instead of view and as users are asking you to have so much filtering then proc is only solution you got.Inside proc filter the data using all these filters and then generate the row_number and then show say first 100 records or like that.

share|improve this answer
    
i was afraid someone would say something like that. =( –  horace Jul 20 '12 at 23:34
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I wish there were something a bit more elegant than this. This is my stored proc solution. The best my lame SQL skills can conjure up.

The OUT parameter in the parameter list is for the total rows in this set so the front end knows how many pages all together with this particular filter set.

CREATE PROC [dbo].[procCampaignGEDPushSelect]
    @LastName       VARCHAR(50)     = null
    ,@FirstName     VARCHAR(50)     = null
    ,@Location      VARCHAR(255)    = null
    ,@DoB           DateTime        = null
    ,@Zip           VARCHAR(50)     = null
    ,@Phone         VARCHAR(50)     = null
    ,@Email         VARCHAR(255)    = null
    ,@Gender        VARCHAR(20)     = null
    ,@IsGED         Bit             = 0
    ,@IsBTT         Bit             = 0
    ,@IsOACE        Bit             = 0
    ,@Completed     Bit             = 0
    ,@TotalCount    INT             OUT
AS
BEGIN

SELECT @LastName    = @LastName     + '%'
SELECT @FirstName   = @FirstName    + '%' 
SELECT @Location    = @Location     + '%' 
SELECT @Zip         = @Zip          + '%' 
SELECT @Phone       = @Phone        + '%' 
SELECT @Email       = @Email        + '%' 
SELECT @Gender      = @Gender       + '%' 

SELECT     row_number() OVER (ORDER BY LastName, FirstName, DoB) AS RowNumber
    , TPT.LastName
    , TPT.FirstName
    , TPT.WF1Site
    , TPT.DOB
    , TPT.Zip
    , TPT.Telephone
    , TPT.CellPhone
    , TPT.Email
    , TPT.Gender
    , TPT.IsBTT
    , TPT.IsGED
    , TPT.IsOACE
    , TPT.IsSRS
    ,CGP.*

FROM        tblCampaignGEDPush CGP

JOIN        tblParticipants TPT
ON          CGP.PartID = TPT.PartID

WHERE       1=1

AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @LastName    IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.LastName    LIKE @LastName  THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END)  
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @FirstName   IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.FirstName   LIKE @Firstname THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END)
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @Location    IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.WF1Site     LIKE @Location  THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END)  
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @Zip         IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.Zip         LIKE @Zip       THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 
AND
(           1 = (CASE WHEN @Phone       IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.Telephone   LIKE @Phone     THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 
    OR      1 = (CASE WHEN @Phone       IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.CellPhone   LIKE @Phone     THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 
)
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @Email       IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.Email       LIKE @Email     THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @Gender      IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.Gender      LIKE @Gender    THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @DoB         IS NOT NULL THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.DoB         = @DoB          THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @IsGED       != 0        THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.IsGED       = 1             THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @IsBTT       != 0        THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.IsBTT       = 1             THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 
AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @IsOACE      != 0        THEN (CASE WHEN TPT.IsOACE      = 1             THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END) 

AND         1 = (CASE WHEN @Completed   != 0        THEN (CASE WHEN CGP.Completed   = 1             THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) ELSE 1 END)

ORDER BY    TPT.LastName
            , TPT.FirstName
            , TPT.DoB


SELECT @TotalCount = @@ROWCOUNT

END

So then I got started thinking. Rather than use this tricky, bug-prone proc (which by the way works fairly well), since I am in .NET, I wonder if there is a nice tight solution there.

Now I know the original question has nothing to do with .NET, so I'm leaving the above proc available for those interested in the strict SQL solution, which, I think, works fairly well.

So I started digging into the IQueryable interface and struck gold:

IQueryable<queryParticipant>    qparticipant = db.queryParticipants.AsQueryable();
...
qparticipant = qparticipant.Where( ... any filter you choose );
...

return qparticipant

    .OrderBy( p => p.LastName )
    .OrderBy( p => p.FirstName )
    .OrderBy( p => p.DOB )
    .Select( ... whatever you like ... )
    .Skip( StartRecordNumber )          // This is the trick! Start the query here..
    .Take( PageSize )                   // Take only as many as you need
    ;

And that's it. The .NET approach is nice if available. The Stored Proc is great when such an API is not available.

share|improve this answer
    
So you're marking the answer which has nothing to do with SQL Server as correct? That'll help future visitors. –  Matt Whitfield Jul 23 '12 at 8:14
    
not exactly. the sqlserver solution is still there. maybe it's missing in your browser? and the sql server solution is fully fleshed out in my marked answer, rather than just a suggestion. the .net solution is provided for anyone that might actually be trying to solve the problem when building a .net application. why not? –  horace Jul 23 '12 at 19:29
    
You are aware that the SQL server version here outputs the entire data set to the client, right? –  Matt Whitfield Jul 23 '12 at 19:57
    
it will unless you pass in parameters that filter the result set in the query. give it a shot. –  horace Jul 23 '12 at 21:34
    
I don't need to, i know what it will do. I hope anyone that uses something like that doesn't work with big data. Sending 1000000 rows back to the client to display a page of 20 isn't exactly best practice. –  Matt Whitfield Jul 23 '12 at 23:35

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