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I'm using Java 6, JUnit 4.8.1, and writing a console application. My application has a member field that isn't exposed …

public class MyApp { 
    ...
    private OpportunitiesService m_oppsSvc;

    private void initServices() { 
        …
        m_oppsSvc = new OpportunitiesServiceImpl(…);
    }
    ...
}

I want to mock a behavior such that whenever one method from my service is called, (e.g. m_oppsSvc.getResults()), the same result is always returned. How do I do that? There's no setter method for the field. I'm currently working with Mockito 1.8.4. Is it possible to do this with Mockito or some other mock framework?

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Can you not create a setter method? –  jrad Jul 20 '12 at 20:37
    
Possible duplicate of How do you unit test private methods? –  David B Jul 20 '12 at 20:38
    
What are you trying to test? is getResults() public? Does it have a private field associated with it, or is it computed at run time? Depending on the answers, you may be able to use a 'spy' or mocking might not have anything to do with it and you could use something like org.springframework.test.util.ReflectionTestUtils to simply set the private field to the value you want. –  jhericks Jul 20 '12 at 22:52

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is what you want:

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class MyApp { 

    @Mock private OpportunitiesService m_oppsSvc;
    @InjectMocks MyApp myApp;

    @Test public void when_MyApp_uses_OpportunititesService_then_verify_something() { 
        // given
        given(m_oppsSvc.whatever()).willReturn(...);

        // when
        myApp.isUsingTheOpportunitiesService(...);

        // then
        verify...
        assertThat...
    }
}

Using: Mockito 1.9.0, BDD style, FEST-Assert AssertJ.

Hope that helps :)

share|improve this answer
    
@InjectMocks only supports setter injection. –  Matt Jul 21 '12 at 1:08
2  
@InjectMocks can also inject private fields. –  ben_w Jul 21 '12 at 2:36
1  
Javadoc was incorrect, it always supported private fields injection. Then setter injection, then constructor injection in 1.9.0. Check InjectmMocks's Javadoc in version 1.9.0 docs.mockito.googlecode.com/hg/1.9.0/org/mockito/… –  Brice Jul 22 '12 at 21:26
    
Correct answer. But I think the problem with code that it breaks "testable code" rules - creation objects and not getting them from construction. –  Eugen Martynov Jul 23 '12 at 6:16
    
@EugenMartynov Yeah agreed, this is arguable ; however with today's injection technics (@Inject (JSR-330), @Autowired (Spring), @Context (CXF), etc.), you may not have externally visible dependencies like in the constructor or with setters. –  Brice Jul 23 '12 at 11:21

You should consider attempts to mock a private field a smell. That is, a sign that either what you're trying to do is either incorrect or that your code is currently structured incorrectly. You should only need to mock public methods or injected dependencies

In the code you've given you should consider injecting OpportunitiesService as follows:

public class MyApp { 
    ...
    private OpportunitiesService m_oppsSvc;

    public MyApp(OpportunitiesService oppsSvc) {
        this.m_oppsSvc = oppsSvc;
    }
    ...
}

In your test you can then inject a mock as follows:

OpportunitiesService mockOpportunitiesService =
    Mockito.mock(OpportunitiesService.class);
Mockit.when(mockOpportunitiesService.someMethod()).thenReturn(someValue);
MyApp app = new MyApp(mockOpportunitiesService);
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Given that you're already using mockito, why not just use reflection:

@RunWith(MockitoJUnitRunner.class)
public class MyApp { 

    @Mock
    private OpportunitiesService m_oppsSvc;

    private MyApp myApp;


    @Before
    public void before() throws Exception {
       myApp = new MyApp();
       Field f = MyApp.class.getDeclaredField("m_oppsSvc");
       f.setAccessible(true);
       f.set(myApp, m_oppsSvc);
    }
}

It's a bit ugly, but it will do the trick. Note that this may not be the most efficient way to do it with Mockito, but it will work.

There's also Powermock which should allow you to do this as well using the Whitebox class. I won't get into the whole details of Powermock but here's the call to inject the private field value, which should be a mock object:

Whitebox.setInternalState(myApp, "m_oppsSvc", m_oppsSvc);
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Generally you should use dependency injection and pass the mock object (of type OppportunitiesServiceImpl) in via the constructor, a separate setter or directly to the method (getResults). You might need to extract an interface for OpportunitiesServiceImpl first.

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Usually, this is solved through the use of dependency injection. In regular (production) mode, your dependency injection container (e.g. Spring or Guice) will inject an instance of OpportunitiesService into MyApp through your constructor or through a setter.

Then, when you're testing you can "inject" a mock instance manually using the same setter or constructor argument.

Instead of doing

m_oppsSvc = new OpportunitiesServiceImpl(…);

Try Passing OpportunitesService in through MyApp's constructor

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You can easily do it with JMockit:

public class MyAppTest
{
    @Tested MyApp myApp;

    @Test
    public testSomething(final @Capturing OpportunitiesService mockService)
    {
        new NonStrictExpectations() {{
            mockService.getResults(); result = asList("a", "b", "C");
            // record other expectations, if needed
        }};

        myApp.whateverMethodIWantToTest();

        new Verifications() {{
            mockService.doSomething(anyInt);
            // verify other expectations, if needed
        }};
    }
}

Even though the implementation class OpportunitiesServiceImpl isn't mentioned in test code, its instances (any number of them) will still get properly mocked.

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