Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I see that the Finally in try .. Catch will execute allways after any parts of the execution of the try catch block.

Is it any different to just skip the Finally section and just run it after, outside the try catch block??

Example 1, Try ... Catch ... Finally ... End Try

    Try
        'Do something
    Catch ex As Exception
        'Handle exception
    Finally
        'Do cleanup
    End Try

Example 2, Try ... Catch ... End Try ... Do the finally stuff outside

    Try
        'Do something
    Catch ex As Exception
        'Handle exception
    End Try
    'Do cleanup
share|improve this question
add comment

14 Answers

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Yes, it is different. Finally will always run (barring program crash). If the function exits inside of the try catch block, or another error is thrown in either the try or the catch, the finally will still execute. You won't get that functionality not using the finally statement.

share|improve this answer
1  
Unfortunately finally blocks run by default if the program crashes in various ways. But you can override this if you want: handle AppDomain.UnhandledException to call Environment.FailFast. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 21 '09 at 11:59
    
Although if you're a Java programmer, you're out of luck: unhandled exceptions execute finally blocks and there's nothing you can really do about it. –  Daniel Earwicker Jul 21 '09 at 12:00
11  
Well, you can do something about it, you can design/write your code so it doesn't use Exceptions for flow control and don't use the finally block for similar things. Finally should be used for cleaning up, which should always occur. –  PintSizedCat Jul 21 '09 at 13:36
1  
Not true, there are times when finally may not be called. Like aborting the program from the OS, or the computer crashing. –  Kevin Jul 21 '09 at 13:53
1  
The two ways it will not execute are when the thread executing the try/catch stops executing or the JVM is terminated. So the thread may stop and the rest of the program continues and you would never know (barring good logs / coding) whether it ran or not. –  amischiefr Jul 22 '09 at 20:07
add comment

Code with four radio buttons:

  • Return in TRY
  • Return in CATCH
  • Throw in CATCH
  • Finish CATCH

    private void checkFinally()
    {
        try
        {
            doFinally();
        }
        catch
        {
            Console.WriteLine(" Breaking news: a crash occured. ");
        }
    }
    
    
    private void doFinally()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(" ");
        Console.Write("Here goes: " 
            + (radioReturnInTry.Checked ? "2. Return in try: " 
                    : (radioReturnInCatch.Checked? "3. Retrun in catch: "
                        : (radioThrowInCatch.Checked? "4. Throw in catch: "
                            : "1. Continue in catch: "))) );
        try
        {
            if (radioReturnInTry.Checked)
            {
                Console.Write(" Returning in try. ");
                return;
            }
            Console.Write(" Throwing up in try.  ");
            throw new Exception("check your checkbox.");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            Console.Write(" ...caughtcha! ");
            if (radioReturnInCatch.Checked)
            {
                Console.Write("Returning in catch. ");
                return;
            }
            if (radioThrowInCatch.Checked)
            {
                Console.Write(" Throwing up in catch. ");
                throw new Exception("after caught");
            }
        }
        finally { Console.Write(" Finally!!"); }
        Console.WriteLine(" Done!!!"); // before adding checkboxThrowInCatch, 
        // this would never happen (and was marked grey by ReSharper)
    
    
    }
    


Output:

  • Here goes: 1. Continue in catch: Throwing up in try. ...caughtcha! Finally!! Done!!!
  • Here goes: 2. Return in try: Returning in try. Finally!!
  • Here goes: 3. Retrun in catch: Throwing up in try. ...caughtcha! Returning in catch. Finally!!
  • Here goes: 4. Throw in catch: Throwing up in try. ...caughtcha! Throwing up in catch. Finally!! Breaking news: a crash occured.


To summarize: Finally takes care of two things:

  1. Of code that returned in the try or in the catch.
  2. Or If you had an exception in the try, AND THROW an exception in the catch,
  3. or, if you had an exception in the try, AND DID NOT CATCH that exception,

Finally to summarize "FINALLY": Finally does nothing special if you tried,and

  1. DID NOT RETURN,
  2. and caught any exceptions during the trial, and then
  3. DID NOT RETURN in the catch either, and
  4. DID NOT THROW or have code that throws up.

And last but not least (finally): If you have an exception in your code that YOU DID NOT CATCH, your code will fly, WITHOUT REACHING THE FINALLY.

Hope this is clear. (Now it is to me...)

Moshe

share|improve this answer
add comment

Finally contains code that needs to be evaluated at all conditions [whether or not an exception occurred].

There is no way to exit a try block without executing its finally block. If the finally block exists, it always executes. (This statement is true for all intents and purposes. There is a way to exit a try block without executing the finally block. If the code executes a System.exit(0); from within a try block, the application terminates without the finally executing. On the other hand, if you unplug the machine during a try block, the finally will not execute either.)

The main use is for disposing objects. It will be useful when you want to close user defined resources like file , opened resources(db stmts).

Edit

Also finally won't be executed after a stackoverflow exception.

share|improve this answer
4  
Will the finally block be executed if there is a StackOverflowException? –  Colin Mackay Jul 21 '09 at 11:41
    
No, it won't be executed. –  rahul Jul 21 '09 at 11:44
    
This assumes that the process doesn't terminate abruptly. –  rahul Jul 21 '09 at 11:45
    
Thanks. Edited my post. –  rahul Jul 21 '09 at 11:47
add comment

This is a good idea when dealing with database connections or anytime objects need to be disposed of. Just in case something goes wrong while running queries, you can still close the connection safely. It also helps to clean up code that the block outside the try/catch/finally block is not able to access.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The difference is when the code in the try block throws an exception that isn't caught by the catch block.

Normally a catch block would catch a specific type of exception, and let anything else through. In that case, the finally block will still run.

The finally block will also run if the code in the try block returns.

share|improve this answer
    
+1: good point with uncaught exception types –  Fredrik Mörk Jul 21 '09 at 11:47
    
it doesn't matter whether the exception is caught or not. The finally block always run (baring exceptional conditions such as "brute force" application exits) –  Rune FS Jul 22 '09 at 9:03
    
@Rune FS: Yes, but if the exception is caught, there's no difference between awe's two examples (barring further exceptions being raised, return statements, etc.). If it isn't caught, there is a difference. That's what awe was asking about. –  RichieHindle Jul 22 '09 at 9:23
add comment

The Finally block will execute regardless of if the function exits because of an exception. (there are some exceptions to this rule, see this stackoverflow question for more info).

For example:

Try
    'Do something
Catch ex As Exception
    if 'Some Condition
       throw ex
    else
       'Handle exception
Finally
    'Do cleanup
End Try

In this case the Finally block will still be executed even though you may throw an exception out of the function.

This is a good practice to get into because it ensures that your cleanup code always executes. Of course using the Resoource Acquisition Is Initialization idiom is a much cleaner way of ensuring that resources get cleaned up, but I'm not versed enough in VB.net to know if this is possible to do.

share|improve this answer
    
"always"? There are a number of reasons a finally block won't run. –  Colin Mackay Jul 21 '09 at 11:48
    
@Nick: note that the finally block is not guarateed to always run; there are some exceptions (!) to this rule; StackOverflowException being one of them. –  Fredrik Mörk Jul 21 '09 at 11:48
    
Unplugging the computer while in the middle of the try block will also cause the finally not to execute :) –  Giovanni Galbo Jul 21 '09 at 11:49
    
Oy, forgive my ignorance of the CLR. I've edited my post. –  Nick Haddad Jul 23 '09 at 1:29
    
If execution reaches an outer scope, all inner finally blocks are guaranteed to have been "run" [though some may have exited early due to exceptions]. Note that it's possible in vb.net or CIL for an outer try block to include code which will be run from within the context of a nested finally block, though C# does not expose such functionality. As for RAII, vb.net and C# can apply the concept to local variables via the using construct, but cannot usefully apply it to fields. –  supercat May 23 '13 at 15:19
add comment

you use finally for cleanup code, eg db connections or files that are open that needs to be close. Virtually any cleanup code that needs to execute regardsless of an exception or not

also, your exception handling might require to re throw the exception, or other exception, in which case the code after the block will not be executed

share|improve this answer
add comment

Doing clean up in a finally block is to ensure that it is run. If the catch block doesn't deal with the exception (ie. it just logs it), or even causes another exception, the code in the finally block will still run.

share|improve this answer
add comment

On top of what everyone else said, semantically I think that they are different.

Code in the finally block clearly states that you're doing finalization type tasks for the content contained within the try-catch. I think this makes it clearer to read.

share|improve this answer
    
I totally agree with you on this. I was just curious if it was any technical difference, and based on what others have said, it is... –  awe Jul 21 '09 at 11:53
add comment

As far as I can remember I have never used a try/catch/finally block in my .NET code.

In general, catching exceptions in the middle tier is rarely needed. Exceptions are usually propagated to a top-level handler in the presentation tier (and possibly caught and rethrown at a tier boundary so they can be logged).

So in the middle tier you will more often see try/finally (or the "using" statement) so that resources are cleaned up. And in try/catch in the top-level handler in the presentation tier.

In the rare cases that I need to both catch an exception and do some cleanup, I would prefer to refactor so that the following:

try
{
    ... do something
}
catch
{
   ... handle exception
}
finally
{
   ... cleanup
}

becomes:

try
{
    DoSomethingAndCleanup();
}
catch
{
   ... handle exception
}

...
private void DoSomethingAndCleanup()
{
    try
    {
        ... do something
    }
    finally
    {
        ... cleanup
    }
}

IMHO this is much cleaner.

share|improve this answer
    
Cathcing exceptions in the middle tier would make sense if the original exeption is caused something that does make sence in the internal code but not out in the presentation tier. It would then make sense to throw an exception that gives more detail about the context for what actually went wrong. –  awe Jul 23 '09 at 5:45
    
It's too bad there's no idiomatic way of doing something in response to an exception without a pretext of resolving it. It's very common for methods to temporarily put an object into a corrupt state but then fix it before they return. Such code should be guarded by a try block that will expressly invalidate the object if an unexpected exception occurs; it seems icky to catch an exception one has no expectation of resolving, but I'm not sure what alternative would exist in C#. –  supercat May 23 '13 at 15:27
add comment

Catch will not run after any parts of the execution of the try catch block. Catch will only run if an exception is thrown and the catch block can handle that type of exception.

The finally block is the one that will run when the try block is complete. By complete, I mean it finishes normally, or exits in some way (breaks out of a loop, returns from the method, throws an exception, etc.)

If you put the code outside the finally block and an exception is thrown (for example) then the code may not be executed if the exception is not caught, or it is rethrown in the catch block, or an new exception is thrown in the catch block. If you put it inside the finally block then it will be executed.

Basically, the clean up should be put in the finally block.

share|improve this answer
add comment

After reading the reply to my comment above I came to think of a few things.

The question can basically not be answered completely with out knowing the code in question.

The reason being that not all code can be put in a finally block. E.g. yield statements are not allow in finally (and catch) blocks. The try block might have several execution braches where some returns and some don't. The finally being executed in all those case whereas in the example with no finally that would not be the case for the clean up code. Further more you can't jump (goto) into a finally block though very uncommon you can jump to the code after the catch block. You can't return from a finally block either.

There's quite a few although most very uncommon cases where the answer depends on the actual code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What I often use is (I encapsulated that into an aspect, but this is what I derived the aspect of):

public static DoLengthyProcessing(this Control control, Action<Control> action)
{
    Cursor oldCursor = control.Cursor
    try
    {
        control.Cursor = Cursors.WaitCursor;
        action(control);
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        ErrorHandler.Current.Handler(ex);
    }
    finally
    {
        control.Cursor = oldCursor;
    }
}

Or, use AOP (as I do).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Finally should be used to everything that needs to be done in order to keep a system consistent. This usually means release resources

Finally is always executed, no matter what exception was thrown. It should be used to release resources, in the following cases:

  • Finalize a connection
  • Close a file handler
  • Free memory
  • Close a database connection

Let me give a complete example. Imagine that that you are sending messages through the network. In pseudo-code:

// With finally                  |  //Without finally
try{                             |  try{  
  send_message()                 |    send_message() 
} catch(NetworkError){           |  } catch(NetworkError){ 
  deal_with_exception()          |    deal_with_exception()
} finally {                      |  }
  finalizes_connection()         |  finalizes_connection() 
}                                |

The only difference of both codes is when what is hold in the try block raises an exception that is not NetworkError, for example, MethodNotFound. In the first case, the method finalizes_connection() will be called, and in the second one, it will not.

A connection is naturally done through more than one program. So what happens in the case of a MethodNotFound exception to the other program? In the first case, your program will finish the connection and the other program and it will be happy. In the second case, the other program can be waiting for your response forever. What if the other program can only receive one connection per time? You just bugged the other program as well.

This would also apply for a file, for example, that you opened and other programs wouldn't be able to open for reading (in Windows). And for memory, it is never released and now you have a memory leak.

share|improve this answer
    
If you only catch a specific exception type, this is obvious, but in my example I catch exception of type Exception which is really an exception of any type. Then the need for finally is not obvious, but this is well answered by others. –  awe Jun 3 '13 at 10:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.