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I'm having some trouble using a MemoryStream

We're using a 3rd party spreadsheet component (similar to excel), and I'm trying to save the data as html which they support through the SaveHtml method below. Seems very simple based on their documentation. Here is my code:

using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
{
   this.ActiveSheet.SaveHtml(memoryStream);

   memoryStream.Position = 0;

   using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(memoryStream))
   {
       var htmlData = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
   }
}

I get an exception when I set the memoryStream.Position = 0:

System.ObjectDisposedException: Cannot access a closed Stream.

A quick look at their SaveHtml method in Reflector shows the following relevant lines:

public void SaveHtml(Stream stream)
{
    StreamWriter writer = null;

    try
    {
        writer = new StreamWriter(stream) { AutoFlush = true };

        writer.Write(str);
    }   
    finally
    {
        if (writer != null)
        {
            writer.Close();
        }
    }
}

I'm guessing because the streamWriter is closed by their code, we're out of luck. Closing the streamWriter, closes the underlying Stream, right?

Any way to get around this?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
3  
memoryStream.GetBuffer() should still work, imho –  user1096188 Jul 20 '12 at 20:51
    
@user1096188: According to the source , it should! Post as answer. Good thing to remember, thanks ;) –  leppie Jul 20 '12 at 20:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It seems it works, so you can create another memory stream. No bytes are copied when extracting the buffer.

using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream()) {
    this.ActiveSheet.SaveHtml(memoryStream);
    var buffer = memoryStream.GetBuffer();
    using (var memoryStream2 = new MemoryStream(buffer))
    using (var streamReader = new StreamReader(memoryStream2)) {
        var htmlData = streamReader.ReadToEnd();
    }
}

Or you can roll out your own uncloseable MemoryStream and feed it to SaveHtml. This will also prevent disposing it, since Dispose just calls Close. Again, imho:

class MemoryStream2 : MemoryStream {
    public override void Close() { }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very clever work! Thanks for the quick response. –  John Russell Jul 20 '12 at 21:05
1  
.GetBuffer() may return garbage bytes at the end. Use .ToArray() instead (which also works when the stream is closed). And instead of creating another memory stream, you can simply call Encoding.UTF8.GetString(memoryStream.ToArray()). –  Allon Guralnek Jul 20 '12 at 21:15
    
@user1096188: It would be better to override Dispose. Good and good idea on override never the less :) +1 –  leppie Jul 20 '12 at 21:21
    
@Allon Are you sure that there will be garbage? I tried to run Console.WriteLine(new MemoryStream(1024 * 1024 * 1024).GetBuffer().Any(b => b != 0)); a few times and it always printed false... –  user1096188 Jul 20 '12 at 21:24
    
@user1096188 The buffer is guaranteed to be zero-initialized. I think Allon's point is that the buffer might be larger than the stream's contents. "Extra" bytes could be non-zero if the stream was shortened at some point. In this case, I doubt that is a risk. Also, while I'm not sure how the StreamReader would handle extra zero bytes at the end, I suspect that handles them just fine. –  phoog Jul 20 '12 at 21:46

Yep that looks like they've done save and forget.

Instead of using memoryStream, use FileStream to a temporary file name. Then you can open up said file to get the content.

share|improve this answer
    
What's horrible about works? also bearing in mind the above wasn't there when I answered, and I wasn't the eejit who wrote a save to stream method that also closed it either, which is about as 'orrible as you can get.... –  Tony Hopkinson Jul 20 '12 at 21:11
1  
@TonyHopkinson: What happens when the OS decides to clean up Temporary files between the 2 calls? This is one of the classic race condition examples. –  leppie Jul 20 '12 at 21:26
    
I said a temporary file name, not a temporary file. I'll admit that wasn't clear, though I think you'd have to make even more unwarranted assumptions to turn it into a race condition, at worst it would have been an exception, when the file it thought should be there was in some way inaccessible. Given some twit already wrote a save routine that closed a stream it didn't own, I suspect the OS clearing out tmp files would be much less likley than some of the other howling errors they could have made. –  Tony Hopkinson Jul 25 '12 at 16:13

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