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Fellas, I apologize for posting almost the same question twice, but I've been sitting on it the whole morning and it seems like the most simple stuff (that I would do in 2 seconds in C#) just escapes me in SQL. (You should've seen how many Steno pad pages with my scribbles I've gone through to make it work....)

Anyway, let me explain. Say, I have a table like this (SQL Server 2008):

CREATE TABLE tbl (ID INT, dtIn DATETIME2, dtOut DATETIME2, Type INT)

INSERT tbl VALUES
(1, '05:00', '6:00', 1),  -- will be removed
(2, '05:00', '7:00', 1),  -- will be removed
(3, '05:01', '8:00', 1),
(4, '05:00', '8:00', 1),
(5, '05:00', '6:00', 2),  -- will be removed
(6, '05:00', '7:00', 2),
(7, '05:00', '7:00', 3),
(8, '04:00', '7:00', 3)

I need to remove all records of the same 'type' (if 2 or more are found) with the same 'dtIn' for their 'type', except the one with the largest 'dtOut'. In other words, the table above should result in this:

(3, '05:01', '8:00', 1),   -- no matching 'dtIn' for 'type' = 1
(4, '05:00', '8:00', 1),   -- largest 'dtOut' for 'type' = 1
(6, '05:00', '7:00', 2),   -- largest 'dtOut' for 'type' = 2
(7, '05:00', '7:00', 3),   -- no matching 'dtIn' for 'type' = 3
(8, '04:00', '7:00', 3)    -- no matching 'dtIn' for 'type' = 4

I've been working on this for so long that the issue now boils down to the simplest -- how do you even select several rows with the equal type from the same table. You can't do select * from tbl where type=type.... Anyway, I'd appreciate some help with this.... Or maybe I just need to make a break from this... Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here's one way to select the rows you want to delete:

SELECT *
FROM tbl T1
WHERE EXISTS
(
    SELECT *
    FROM tbl T2
    WHERE T1.Type = T2.Type
    AND T1.dtIn = T2.dtIn
    AND (
            T1.dtOut < T2.dtOut
            OR (T1.dtOut = T2.dtOut AND T1.id < T2.id)
        )
)

This query can also be easily changed to actually delete the rows. Just change SELECT * to DELETE T1. But please do test that it does what you want before actually running the delete statement.

See it working online: sqlfiddle


Update

Here's an approach using ROW_NUMBER:

;WITH T1 AS (
    SELECT id, ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Type, dtIn
                                  ORDER BY dtOut DESC, ID DESC) AS rn
    FROM tbl
)
SELECT * FROM tbl
WHERE id IN
(
    SELECT id
    FROM T1
    WHERE rn > 1
)

See it working online: sqlfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Listen, how is it even humanly possible for you to do something within literally 10 seconds of me posting it, when I've been working on this the whole morning??? –  ahmd0 Jul 20 '12 at 22:09
3  
@ahmd0: Lots of practice! The first time I had to do something like this, it took me quite a while too. :-) –  Mark Byers Jul 20 '12 at 22:12
    
No, seriously, Mark, how do you learn all this stuff? Is there a special book that teaches you this... Because it's not just a plain programming skill. –  ahmd0 Jul 20 '12 at 22:13
1  
@ahmd0: Thanks for pointing that out. I fixed it. Use DELETE T1. –  Mark Byers Jul 20 '12 at 22:24
1  
Strange... it seems to work for me: sqlfiddle.com/#!3/1d8db/4 –  Mark Byers Jul 20 '12 at 23:27

not very elegant (+ the conditions are the same as Mark's answer) but it's an alternative.

Fiddle is here

;with my_cte(ID)
as
(
  SELECT T1.ID
  FROM 
      tbl T1
      JOIN tbl T2 on
        T1.Type = T2.Type
        AND T1.dtIn = T2.dtIn
        AND T1.dtOut < T2.dtOut
  )
select *
from tbl t
where not exists 
              (
              select 1 
              from my_cte c 
              where t.ID = c.ID
              ) 
share|improve this answer

Queries for Duplicate Rows

I just saw that you can have duplicate rows. So:

DELETE X
FROM
   (SELECT Row_Number() OVER (PARTITION BY Type, dtIn ORDER BY dtOut DESC) Item, *
   FROM #tbl) X
WHERE Item > 1

Note that this version above doesn't need a join so should perform better than all other queries on the page.

or

DELETE T
FROM #tbl T
   CROSS APPLY (
      SELECT TOP 1 *
      FROM #tbl T2
      WHERE
         T.dtIn = T2.dtIn
         AND T.Type = T2.Type
      ORDER BY T2.dtOut DESC, T2.ID DESC
   ) X
WHERE T.ID < X.ID

or

DELETE T
FROM #tbl T
   INNER JOIN #tbl T2
      ON T.dtIn = T2.dtIn
      AND T.Type = T2.Type
      AND (
         T.dtOut < T2.dtOut
         OR (T.tdOut = T2.dtOut AND T.ID > T2.ID)
      )

Queries for no Duplicate Rows

If you couldn't have duplicate rows (except for ID) then it would be simpler:

DELETE T
FROM #tbl T
WHERE EXISTS (
   SELECT * FROM #tbl T2
   WHERE
      T.dtIn = T2.dtIn
      AND T.Type = T2.Type
      AND T.dtOut < T2.dtOut
)

or even

DELETE T
FROM #tbl T
   INNER JOIN #tbl T2
      ON T.dtIn = T2.dtIn
      AND T.Type = T2.Type
      AND T.dtOut < T2.dtOut
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Yes, duplicate records are possible, so you short versions won't work. –  ahmd0 Jul 20 '12 at 23:54
1  
@ahmd0 Two more versions added –  ErikE Jul 21 '12 at 0:15
    
Thanks. Give me some time to study it. So far it's way over my league... –  ahmd0 Jul 21 '12 at 16:52

Mine is a little different from @Mark's, but I believe it should get you the same results (only because I assume that id is unique):

DELETE a
FROM dbo.tbl a
WHERE id <> (
    SELECT MAX(id)
    from dbo.tbl b
    WHERE a.type = b.type
      AND a.dtIn = b.dtIn
)
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, sqlfiddle.com doesn't seem to return the correct result with your query. It's way beyond my knowledge to correct it though... –  ahmd0 Jul 20 '12 at 22:18
2  
Mmm, seems to work for me... sqlfiddle.com/#!3/1ff87/2 –  Mark Byers Jul 20 '12 at 22:21
    
Hmmm. Strange, now it does. Sorry, I'm not sure why it gave me a different result... maybe because I'm heckuva tired. Thanks for your input too! –  ahmd0 Jul 20 '12 at 22:30
2  
Actually, I just realized that this code assumes that a higher id also means a higher dtOut, which may not be the case. It'd probably be safer to change the ids in that statement to dtOuts (if that matches your reality). –  bhamby Jul 20 '12 at 22:31
    
@bhamby: Sorry, I'm not sure I follow you. Can you correct your actual SQL. Also note that it should do deletion and not just selection. I also found out that Mark's code doesn't seem to handle duplicate dtIn and dtOut's. Read my comment to his post above... ding it! Back to the drawing board. But at least I know what your guys' logic is now... –  ahmd0 Jul 20 '12 at 22:59
DECLARE @Table TABLE     
(  
ID INT,  
newno int  
)   

insert @table  
SELECT T1.ID,   
ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Type, dtIn
                              ORDER BY dtOut DESC, ID DESC) AS newno  
 FROM tbl T1      

 select *  
from tbl t
where t.ID IN
             (
              select ID from @Table where newno > 1
              )    
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