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I'm building a website, and I'm using the Twitter API to display data from a user's tweets. It works fine, but all the tweets are retrieved in plain text. This means that, unlike on the Twitter website, all links are simply plain text, no @names are links, and hashtags are completely static.

I would assume that Twitter pulls out these elements using regular expressions, but not only am I fairly poor at regexes, I want the result to be as close to Twitter's implementation as possible. Is there any way to pull these from the Twitter API itself? If not, how could I get parsing as close to Twitter's as possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Look at Tweet Entities . You can add the parameter &tweet_entities=1 to the end of some REST calls. The JSON response will include the extra attributes your looking for attributed to the tweet.

I.E

The urls entity

An array of URLs extracted from the Tweet text. Each URL entity comes with the following attributes: url , display_url, expanded_url, indices

 "text": "Twitter for Mac is now easier and faster, and you can open multiple windows at once http://t.co/0JG5Mcq",
    "entities": {
      "media": [
      ],
      "urls": [
        {
          "url": "http://t.co/0JG5Mcq",
          "display_url": "blog.twitter.com/2011/05/twitte…",
          "expanded_url": "http://blog.twitter.com/2011/05/twitter-for-mac-update.html",
          "indices": [
            84,
            103
          ]
        }
      ],
      "user_mentions": [
      ],
      "hashtags": [
      ]
    }

The hashtags entity

An array of hashtags extracted from the Tweet text. Each Hashtag entity comes with the following attributes:

text
The Hashtag text indices
The character positions the Hashtag was extracted from

    "text": "Loved #devnestSF"
>     "entities": {
>       "media": [
>       ],
>       "urls": [
>       ],
>       "user_mentions": [
>       ],
>       "hashtags": [
>         "text": "devnestSF"
>         "indices": [
>           6,
>           16
>         ]
>       ]
>     }

The user_mentions entity

An array of Twitter screen names extracted from the Tweet text. Each User entity comes with the following attributes:

id
The User ID (int format) id_str The User ID (string format) screen_name
The User screen name name
The User's full name indices
The character positions the User mention was extracted from

"text": "@rno Et demi!"
    "entities": {
      "media": [
      ],
      "urls": [
      ],
      "user_mentions": [
        {
          "id": 22548447,
          "id_str": "22548447",
          "screen_name": "rno",
          "name": "Arnaud Meunier",
          "indices": [
            0,
            4
          ]
        }
      ],
      "hashtags": [
      ]
    }

more Tweet Entities at this link:

https://dev.twitter.com/docs/tweet-entities

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Wow this was very helpful, saved me from making these calls myself and digging through the json to see what kinds of responses were returned. Do you know what goes under the "media" key? (if you add that then it's a complete documentation of Tweet Entities) Thanks! –  methodMan Jul 23 '12 at 18:20
    
no problem yw :) –  Chamilyan Jul 23 '12 at 18:21
    
Photo's. There was talk of including other media entities, but right now it's photos uploaded directly to Twitter or through the photo API. I didn't include it in the answer as the question was talking about the 3 that I listed. –  Chamilyan Jul 23 '12 at 18:35

I believe this is what you are looking for:

https://dev.twitter.com/docs/api/1/get/statuses/oembed

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