Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So the issue I'm having is that I make changes to let's say a css file on my drupal website. That change shows up immediately on google chrome when I navigate to that part of the site that I was targeting. When I navigate to that part of the site in firefox, it shows me the old page that I have visited before. Of course a manual refresh of firefox fixes this.

The problem lies in the fact that when the user will see an older version of the page, they may not know to hit the refresh button, and will assume it is broken.

So basically, is there a way to check if the current page has been cached and tell firefox to clear it in php, or perhaps a more elegant approach?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unfortunately you can't easily discern whether or not a client has cached a page from PHP or any server environment. You can, however, advise browsers on whether or not to cache and for how long. This is accomplished by setting the Cache-Control HTTP header (and friends). See this page. Most folks tend to specify caching for up to a few hours in the future, so users will see stale data for no more than 2 hours. I'd recommend this, but you can also instruct browsers to effectively turn caching off altogether. Anyhow, the simplest solution in my opinion is to set these headers in your .htaccess file.

Here's an example with a 2-hour time limit:

# Cache CSS and JS files for up to 2 hours
<FilesMatch "\.(css|js)$">
    <IfModule mod_headers.c>
        # Set Max-age to 7200 seconds (2 hours), revalidate after 2 hours (ask the server if the file's changed)
        Header set Cache-Control "max-age=7200, must-revalidate"
    </IfModule>
    FileETag MTime Size
</FilesMatch>

Another option is to allow caching, but force the client to ask the server if anything has changed on every request. This won't have as large of a benefit, especially on pages serving many css and js files (normally the case with Drupal) as the browser will still have to make a round-trip request to the server for each file:

# Only use cache if checking with the server results in a 304 (Not Modified)
<FilesMatch "\.(css|js)$">
    <IfModule mod_headers.c>
        # Instruct the client and possibly proxies in front of the client to check for new versions every 0 seconds (always)
        Header set Cache-Control "max-age=0, public, must-revalidate, proxy-revalidate"
        # For older browsers
        Header set Expires "Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 GMT"
    </IfModule>
    FileETag MTime Size
</FilesMatch>

Finally, you can ask the browser to disable caching. I wouldn't recommend this unless you're certain that files will change very frequently, as page load times will suffer:

# Disable caching
<FilesMatch "\.(css|js)$">
    <IfModule mod_headers.c>
        Header set Cache-Control "no-store, no-cache, must-revalidate, proxy-revalidate, max-age=0"
        # For older browsers
        Header set Expires "Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 GMT"
    </IfModule>
    FileETag MTime Size
</FilesMatch>
share|improve this answer
    
This is the best answer I've ever received on stackoverflow. I'll try it first thing Monday, thanks! –  prashn64 Jul 21 '12 at 8:46
    
Just about got this working, but I noticed I had to refresh to make the max-age show up in the header. Should I add the .htaccess file to the FilesMatch? –  prashn64 Jul 23 '12 at 16:30
    
If I'm understanding what you're saying correctly, that's what should happen. Your browser will cache the max-age header (and the file) and not re-check with the server until that max-age time is up. You didn't have a max-age set before, so the browser was caching indefinitely and your updates to your .htaccess would not be reflected until you cleared your cache. Which is a long way of saying: no worries, you're doing it right! –  Zach Shipley Jul 24 '12 at 12:42
    
Yeah, you are right, that makes sense, but I found a way around it(I think), and that is to restart the server so the htaccess changes are noted immediately by the browser. Suprisingly, there was a max-age set before, to about 2 weeks if I calculated right. Probably a drupal default. Thanks for your help! –  prashn64 Jul 24 '12 at 16:41
add comment

For a simpler (non drupal) solution you could rename the style meta href to something else. eg. style.css?vers=1.0 ... style.css?vers=1.1 ... style.css?vers=1.1a ... etc

For Drupal hitting the Clear all caches button will rename your style sheet reference as above. (config/development/performance)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.