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I'm stumped. I keep getting a Called id for nil error Assume i have the following models:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  self.primary_key = 'name'
  attr_accessible :name

  has_many :projects, :through => :user_projects
  has_many :user_projects    
end

class UserProject < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :project

  after_save do |r|
    puts r.user.id #<<<<<error here!
  end
end

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  attr_accessible :name#, :body

  has_many :user_projects
  has_many :users, :through=> :user_projects
  # attr_accessible :title, :body
end

and the following migrations:

class CreateUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :users do |t|
      t.string :name
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

class CreateProjects < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :projects do |t|
      t.string :name
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

class CreateUserProjects < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :user_projects do |t|
      t.references :user
      t.references :project
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

running something like :

@project = Factory.create(:project)
@user = Factory.create(:user)
@user.projects << @project

I would get this:

RuntimeError: Called id for nil, which would mistakenly be 4 -- if you really wanted the id of nil, use object_id

Why does the the after_save callback break and what can i do to fix it? It seems like i can't refer to the associated user object from the callback at all. However, if i remove

self.primary_key = 'name' 

from the User model, everything works fine. I'm missing something but i don't know what.

Thanks in advance! btw im on rails 3.2.6.

share|improve this question
    
Why you don't use a normal id? – Dougui Jul 21 '12 at 1:59
    
This is definitely oversimplified. I'm working with a legacy db. where ids strings. – John Jul 21 '12 at 3:15
    
actually.... this gives me an idea.. – John Jul 21 '12 at 3:15

Try to set id to false in your migration like this :

class CreateUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :users, :id => false do |t|
      t.string :name
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for the inspiration Dougui! i figured it out. the t.references :project helper defaults the foreign_key to an integer. I changed it manually to the correct type. So now it works!

YaY

class CreateUserProjects < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    create_table :user_projects do |t|
      t.string :user_id #<<<<<<< STRING!!
      t.references :project
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end
share|improve this answer

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