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I want div C to fill the remainder of the height of parent div A, while allowing the sibling div B to have adjustable height. Is this possible with just CSS (no javascript)?

Other similar questions have been answered by "position div C absolutely", but that doesn't work for me because I want div B to have a variable height depending on its content.

+---------------------------------------+
| D +---------------------------------+ |
| i | div B (min and variable height) | |
| v +=================================| |
|   |               ^                 | |
| A |               |                 | |
|   |              div C              | |
|   |      (remainder of height)      | |
|   |               |                 | |
|   |               v                 | |
|   +---------------------------------+ |
+---------------------------------------+
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no way without using js because it requires calculations –  CoreyRS Jul 21 '12 at 3:41
    
What's the least amount of content div B would have? With that information could you set a min-height for div C to fill up the remainder of the space? –  Anagio Jul 21 '12 at 3:45
    
Do you mean set height instead of min-height? That could work, but it isn't elastic then. –  Nate Barr Jul 21 '12 at 3:47
    
A table container for the divs seems to work if I give the <tr> a style of display:block, but using tables to accomplish layout seems semantically incorrect, right? –  Nate Barr Jul 21 '12 at 3:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

What if you set the top div to float: left and width: 100%?

I have tried to test it in JSFiddle and it seems to work.

Code is here.

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+1 Nice jsFiddle! –  arttronics Jul 21 '12 at 6:34
1  
This actually doesn't work, if you comment out the color of your #b box then you can see that #c still fills the entire background. Also a quick javascript alert on $('#a').height() and $('#c').height() shows that both are the same... –  sadmicrowave May 1 '13 at 22:01

Here's another method.

Reference: jsFiddle

This one does not float the div and instead uses a #divWrapper to handle the internal #divTop and #divBottom requirements.

HTML:

<div id="divContent">

    <div id="divWrapper">

      <div id="divTop">
        <p>This is random webpage content for div B. <br />
           This is random webpage content for div B. <br />
           This is random webpage content for div B. <br />
           This is random webpage content for div B. <br />        
           The 'background-color' aqua is the size of this div B. <br />
            <b>Note CSS 'min-height' is optionally used for this div. </b>
        </p>
      </div>

      <div id="divBottom">
        <p>The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 01 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 02 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 03 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 04 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 05 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 06 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 07 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 08 <br />
           Since this div is secondary, contents may clip. Line 09 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 10 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 11 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 12 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 13 <br />
           The remainder of the space is used by div C. Line 14 <br />
          </p>
      </div>

    </div>

</div>

CSS:

#divContent {
    background-color: yellow;
    border: 3px solid red;
    width:400px;
    height: 400px;
}

#divWrapper {
    height: 90%;
    width: 90%;
    top: 5%;
    left: 5%;
    position: relative;
    border: 1px solid black;
    overflow: hidden;
}

#divTop {
    background-color: aqua;
    min-height: 155px;          /* Optional minimum height setting */
}

#divBottom {
    background-color: pink;
    width: 100%;
}


#divTop:hover, #divBottom:hover {
    background-color: white;
}
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Nice setup. I had a similar idea at first. I'm actually filling the divBottom (or div C) with a Google Chart, which sets its height to the current height of that anchor div. So I can't use the content to expand the height. Also, I need all of divBottom to be visible (no overflow:hidden). –  Nate Barr Jul 21 '12 at 15:45
    
Thanks for the feedback. Nevertheless, +1 for a great Question. Cheers! –  arttronics Jul 21 '12 at 19:48

This is probably not workable for you (only very modern browsers implement it), but it might be worth mentioning that the flexible box model is meant to solve problems like this. An example (jsfiddle):

HTML:

<div id="container">
    <div class="top">Hello there.</div>
    <div class="bottom">Hello to you as well!</div>
</div>

CSS:

body, html {
    height: 100%;
}

#container {
    display: -webkit-box;
    -webkit-box-orient: vertical;
    /* Set a hard-to-work-with height */
    height: 82%;
    border: 1px solid #000;
}

.top {
    -webkit-box-flex: 1;
}

.bottom {
    /* Emphasize that we want the bottom to take up more space */
    -webkit-box-flex: 10;
    background: #999;
}

EDIT: Further reading here: http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2011/09/19/css3-flexible-box-layout-explained/

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I forgot to mention that there is a javascript shim for the flexible box model. I'll hazard a guess that it impacts performance, but hey, it exists: flexiejs.com –  Zach Shipley Jul 21 '12 at 4:33

You can do this by "faking" a table, without using one.

Just set up a div structure to mimic the table's tr, td structure and set the CSS to display the divs as a table.

http://jsfiddle.net/Kyle_Sevenoaks/EYuNz/3/

(you click the div with content to add more, it shows you the variable height)

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Downvotes without comments. One reason I stopped coming here so much –  Kyle Dec 31 '12 at 18:58

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