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I have a vectorization question, and I can't seem to find a solution online. I have a very large dataframe, and currently I'm using the following loop to filter and get lag values:

rowtype <-c('A','B','A','A','B','B','B','B','A','B','B','A','B','A','B','B','A','A');
values1<-c(2,1,8,5,-4,6,42,10,20,5,7,8,-2,8,9,3,2,5); 
index<-seq(1:length(values1));

df<-data.frame(rowtype, values1, index);

mininumBsize <- 2;

df$firstBLagged<-0;
df$secondBLagged<-0;
df$thirdBLagged<-0;

for (idx in which(df$rowtype=='A') )
{
  #get the past 5 lagged values of type 'B' that exceed a threshold
  laggedValues <- rev(df[df$rowtype=='B' & df$values1 > mininumBsize & df$index < idx,]$values1)[1:5];

  #take out any NA values here
  laggedValues[is.na(laggedValues)]<-0;

  #store those lagged values back into the dataframe
  df$firstBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[1];
  df$secondBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[2];
  df$thirdBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[3];
}

The output of the dataframe looks like this:

> df
   rowtype values1 index firstBLagged secondBLagged thirdBLagged
1        A       2     1            0             0            0
2        B       1     2            0             0            0
3        A       8     3            0             0            0
4        A       5     4            0             0            0
5        B      -4     5            0             0            0
6        B       6     6            0             0            0
7        B      42     7            0             0            0
8        B      10     8            0             0            0
9        A      20     9           10            42            6
10       B       5    10            0             0            0
11       B       7    11            0             0            0
12       A       8    12            7             5           10
13       B      -2    13            0             0            0
14       A       8    14            7             5           10
15       B       9    15            0             0            0
16       B       3    16            0             0            0
17       A       2    17            3             9            7
18       A       5    18            3             9            7

Essentially, for each row with a type of 'A', I would like to get the past 5 values of type 'B' that exceeds a certain threshold, "mininumBsize". Then I would like to store it back into the dataframe into df$firstBlagged,etc, so that I can use it for a regression and other analysis later.

Unfortunately, this code is taking too long to run (and I would also like to understand how to write better R). Most of the examples online show how to filter on just the row itself, but not how to get lagged values based on conditions. Does anyone know how to solve this problem? Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
It's very difficult for folks to help with problems like these unless the code you provide is reproducible. You don't have to provide your entire data set; just boil it down to something representative that we can copy+paste and will actually run in an R session on our computers. – joran Jul 21 '12 at 3:56
    
I added more data so that you can run it. The output should be as above. – newRUser Jul 21 '12 at 4:29
1  
I suggest you look at the data.table package which is an extension of data frame. Its very easy to get lagged values on it. I asked a very similar question about it a few days ago here : stackoverflow.com/questions/11397771/… – user1480926 Jul 21 '12 at 12:48
    
@user1480926 - Note that this task is not equivalent to the task in your question. But, I would not be surprised if data.table could do this ... – Roland Jul 21 '12 at 12:56
    
Yes data.table should be able to do this efficiently. I've tagged the question data.table in case anyone has time to revisit this. – Matt Dowle Aug 31 '12 at 22:19

I don't see an easy way to fully vectorize this, but would be interested to learn one, if it exists. However, I can make it more efficient.

Let's use a larger data.frame, so we can use system.time:

rowtype <-rep(c('A','B','A','A','B','B','B','B','A','B','B','A','B','A','B','B','A','A'),1000)
values1<-rep(c(2,1,8,5,-4,6,42,10,20,5,7,8,-2,8,9,3,2,5),1000) 
index<-seq(1:length(values1))

df<-data.frame(rowtype, values1, index)

Now we wrap your code into a function:

addlagged<-function(df,mininumBsize = 2){
  df$firstBLagged<-0;
  df$secondBLagged<-0;
  df$thirdBLagged<-0;

  for (idx in which(df$rowtype=='A') )
  {
    #get the past 5 lagged values of type 'B' that exceed a threshold
    laggedValues <- rev(df[df$rowtype=='B' & df$values1 > mininumBsize & df$index < idx,]$values1)[1:5];

    #take out any NA values here
    laggedValues[is.na(laggedValues)]<-0;

    #store those lagged values back into the dataframe
    df$firstBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[1];
    df$secondBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[2];
    df$thirdBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[3];
    }
  return(df)
}

Now the more efficient function:

  addlagged2<-function(df,mininumBsize = 2){  
  #make sure rowtype is not a factor, but a character
  df$rowtype<-as.character(df$rowtype)
  #subset before the loop
  df2<-subset(df,!(rowtype=="B" & values1<mininumBsize))


  #initialize vectors
  firstBLagged <- rep(0,nrow(df2))
  secondBLagged <- rep(0,nrow(df2))
  thirdBLagged <- rep(0,nrow(df2))

  for (idx in which(df2$rowtype=='A') )
  {
    #get the past 3 lagged values of type 'B'    
    laggedValues <- df2$values1[1:idx][df2$rowtype[1:idx]=='B']
    #do not use rev
    laggedValues <- laggedValues[length(laggedValues):(length(laggedValues)-2)]

    #don't save to data.frame inside loop, use vectors
    firstBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[1];
    secondBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[2];
    thirdBLagged[idx]<-laggedValues[3];
  }
  #take out any NA values here (do it only ones and not inside the loop)
  firstBLagged[is.na(firstBLagged)]<-0
  secondBLagged[is.na(secondBLagged)]<-0
  thirdBLagged[is.na(thirdBLagged)]<-0

  #create columns in df     
  df$firstBLagged<-0
  df$secondBLagged<-0
  df$thirdBLagged<-0

  #transfer results to df
  df$firstBLagged[!(as.character(df$rowtype)=="B" & df$values1<mininumBsize)]<-firstBLagged
  df$secondBLagged[!(as.character(df$rowtype)=="B" & df$values1<mininumBsize)]<-secondBLagged
  df$thirdBLagged[!(as.character(df$rowtype)=="B" & df$values1<mininumBsize)]<-thirdBLagged
  return(df)
}

Is it faster?

> system.time(df2<-addlagged(df))
       User      System verstrichen 
     37.157      24.591      61.735 
> system.time(df3<-addlagged2(df))
       User      System verstrichen 
      2.866       0.517       3.382 

Are the results identical?

> df3$rowtype<-factor(df3$rowtype)
> identical(df2,df3)
[1] TRUE

What is taking most of the computing time for the improved function? Lets look at the output of Rprof:

> summaryRprof()
$by.self
                 self.time self.pct total.time total.pct
"=="                 0.346    61.79      0.346     61.79
":"                  0.189    33.75      0.189     33.75
"$"                  0.016     2.86      0.016      2.86
"$<-.data.frame"     0.005     0.89      0.005      0.89
"try"                0.001     0.18      0.002      0.36
"-"                  0.001     0.18      0.001      0.18
"is.na"              0.001     0.18      0.001      0.18
"tryCatch"           0.001     0.18      0.001      0.18

$by.total
                 total.time total.pct self.time self.pct
"=="                  0.346     61.79     0.346    61.79
":"                   0.189     33.75     0.189    33.75
"$"                   0.016      2.86     0.016     2.86
"$<-.data.frame"      0.005      0.89     0.005     0.89
"$<-"                 0.005      0.89     0.000     0.00
"try"                 0.002      0.36     0.001     0.18
"-"                   0.001      0.18     0.001     0.18
"is.na"               0.001      0.18     0.001     0.18
"tryCatch"            0.001      0.18     0.001     0.18

$sample.interval
[1] 0.001

$sampling.time
[1] 0.56

Most of the time is spend with all the subseting and creating sequences in the loop. Using *apply functions won't help with that. I tried to use data.table and its binary search, but it did not help; most likely because I had to set a key inside the loop. I don't have much experience with data.table, so probably I did something wrong.

In the end this was code review and does not really belong on Stack Overflow.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the help. It is faster, but my dataset is very large, and even something like this take half an hour to run. I've seen people perform vectorization using various *apply functions. Do those speed up the code at all? – newRUser Jul 22 '12 at 2:48
    
I increased the speed again by more than 50 %. See my edits to the answer. I also added some profiling output, which imo shows that simply substituting the for-loop by an *apply function won't help. But I could be wrong, of course. – Roland Jul 22 '12 at 10:19

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