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I need to parse a line that is in a similar format as following:

s = "Jun 21 09:47:50 ez-x5 user.debug if_comm: [TX] 02 30 20 0f 30 31 39 24 64 31 30 31 03 54 ";

I am splitting the line with [TX] or [RX]. Here's what I do with the parsed string:

s = "Jun 21 09:47:50 ez-x5 user.debug if_comm: [TX] 02 30 20 0f 30 31 39 24 64 31 30 31 03 54 ";
string[] stringSeparators = new string[] { "[TX] " + start_key };
string transfer = s.Split(stringSeparators, 2, StringSplitOptions.None)[1];
//At this point, transfer[] = 02 30 20 0f 30 31 39 24 64 31 30 31 03 54
if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(transfer))
{
    string key = ""; 
    string[] split = transfer.Split(' ');
    if (split[0] == start_key)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < key_length; i++)
        {
            key += split[i + Convert.ToInt32(key_index)];
        }
        TX_Handle(key);
    }
}

stringSeparators = new string[] { "[RX]" + start_key };
transfer = s.Split(stringSeparators, 2, StringSplitOptions.None)[1];
if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(transfer))
{
    string key = "";
    string[] split = transfer.Split(' ');
    if (split[0] == start_key)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < key_length; i++)
        {
            key += split[i + Convert.ToInt32(key_index)];
        }
        RX_Handle(key);
    }
}

Basically, because I have no realistic way of comparing whether the given token is [TX] or [RX], I am forced to use the above approach to separate the string, which requires me to write essentially the same code twice.

What is a way I can get around this problem and know which token is being parsed so that I don't have to duplicate my code?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The best way to do this is look at what is common. What is common in your code? Splitting based on 2 different tokens and a function call based on 2 different tokens. This can be broken into a conditional, so, why not move the common element into a conditional?

const string receiveToken = "[RX] ";
const string transmitToken = "[TX] ";

string token = s.IndexOf(receiveToken) > -1 ? receiveToken  : transmitToken;

..now you have your token, so you can remove most of the duplication.

stringSeparators = new string[] { token + start_key };
transfer = s.Split(stringSeparators, 2, StringSplitOptions.None)[1];
if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(transfer))
{
    string key = "";
    string[] split = transfer.Split(' ');
    if (split[0] == start_key)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < key_length; i++)
        {
            key += split[i + Convert.ToInt32(key_index)];
        }
        RX_TX_Handle(key, token);
    }
}

..then you can have a common handler, eg:

void RX_TX_Handle(string key, string token)
{
    token == receiveToken ? RX_Handle(key) : TX_Handle(key);
}
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Your answer is so quick and pro that StackOverflow refuses me to accept it as an answer for another 3 minutes –  l46kok Jul 21 '12 at 4:28
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How about a different approach and use a regular expression. Mixin a little bit of LINQ and you have some pretty easy to follow code.

static void ParseLine(
    string line,
    int keyIndex,
    int keyLength,
    Action<List<byte>> txHandler,
    Action<List<byte>> rxHandler)
{
    var re = new Regex(@"\[(TX|RX)\](?: ([0-9a-f]{2}))+");
    var match = re.Match(line);
    if (match.Success)
    {
        var mode = match.Groups[1].Value; // either TX or RX
        var values = match.Groups[2]
            .Captures.Cast<Capture>()
            .Skip(keyIndex)
            .Take(keyLength)
            .Select(c => Convert.ToByte(c.Value, 16))
            .ToList();
        if (mode == "TX") txHandler(values);
        else if (mode == "RX") rxHandler(values);
    }
}

Or without regular expressions:

static void ParseLine(
    string line,
    int keyIndex,
    int keyLength,
    Action<List<byte>> txHandler,
    Action<List<byte>> rxHandler)
{
    var start = line.IndexOf('[');
    var end = line.IndexOf(']', start);
    var mode = line.Substring(start + 1, end - start - 1);
    var values = line.Substring(end + 1)
        .Split(new[] { ' ' }, StringSplitOptions.RemoveEmptyEntries)
        .Skip(keyIndex)
        .Take(keyLength)
        .Select(s => Convert.ToByte(s, 16))
        .ToList();
    if (mode == "TX") txHandler(values);
    else if (mode == "RX") rxHandler(values);
}
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Hey, this is a very good answer as well. Although I think Regular expression might be an overkill for something of this simplicity, still a good reference to have. –  l46kok Jul 21 '12 at 4:53
    
You don't necessarily need to use regular expressions here, you just need to recognize that the token you're interested in is within the [square brackets]. Just separate that part out however you can and work from there. A regular expression works well for that so I went for it. –  Jeff Mercado Jul 21 '12 at 4:58
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I am not 100% sure if this answers your questions but I would create a TokenParser class that is responsible for parsing a token. You'll find it much easier to unit test.

public enum TokenType
{
    Unknown = 0,
    Tx = 1,
    Rx = 2
}

public class Token
{
    public TokenType TokenType { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<string> Values { get; set; }
}

public class TokenParser
{
    public Token ParseToken(string input)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(input)) throw new ArgumentNullException("input");

        var token = new Token { TokenType = TokenType.Unknown };

        input = input.ToUpperInvariant();
        if (input.Contains("[TX]"))
        {
            token.TokenType = TokenType.Tx;
        }
        if (input.Contains("[RX]"))
        {
            token.TokenType = TokenType.Rx;
        }

        input = input.Substring(input.LastIndexOf("]", System.StringComparison.Ordinal) + 1);
        token.Values = input.Trim().Split(Convert.ToChar(" "));

        return token;
    }
}

The example could be easily extended to allow multiple token parsers if the logic for parsing each token is vastly different.

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