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so I just started learning python and I get mini-lessons from my friend every week. This week was to make a simple slot machine game. There are 6 items in the slot machine, and when 3 or more of the same item show up, the user wins. I've tried the below code:

for i in slotScreen:
    if slotScreen.count(i) == 3:
        print('You got 3 of the same! You win!')

The code works when the first item in the list is part of the 3 of a kind, but the code doesn't work if none of the three elements are first on the list, like below:

slotScreen = ['lemon', 'cherry', 'lemon', 'lemon', 'pirate', 'bar']  # works

slotScreen = ['cherry', 'lemon', 'lemon', 'lemon', 'pirate', 'bar']  # not work

Any idea why this happens?

EDIT: More code. I get the You Lose message when I should be getting the You win 3x message.

        for i in slotScreen:
            if slotScreen.count(i) == 6:
                print('You win 10x your bet!!!')
                x = x + int(bet) * 10
                break

            elif slotScreen.count(i) == 5:
                print('You win 5x your bet!')
                x = x + int(bet) * 5
                break

            elif slotScreen.count(i) == 4:
                print('You win 4x your bet!')
                x = x + int(bet) * 4
                break

            elif slotScreen.count(i) == 3:
                print('You win 3x your bet!')
                x = x + int(bet) * 3
                break

            elif slotScreen.count(i) <= 2:
                print('Sorry you lose')
                break
share|improve this question
3  
Your code looks right. But, it'd be "faster" (O(n) instead of O(n^2)) to do elem, count = Counter(slotScreen).most_common(1); if count > 3: print("Got {} {} times".format(elem, count)) –  Dougal Jul 21 '12 at 6:23
1  
@Dougal post as solution so I can upvote it –  jamylak Jul 21 '12 at 6:34
1  
Thanks for the tip! However like I said I'm just starting out so I'd like to try and learn the basic stuff first. Maybe its just me being new, but that code looks harder to understand :/ –  Dan Jul 21 '12 at 6:43

6 Answers 6

Your program always does break in the first for iteration, so it only evaluates the first element of the list.

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Marco de Wit's response is correct. I thought I would offer a possible solution.

from collections import Counter

counter = Counter(['cherry', 'lemon', 'lemon', 'lemon', 'pirate', 'bar'])
symbol, count = counter.most_common(1)[0]

This will give you the symbol (in this case, 'lemon') and its count (in this case, 3) of the most common symbol in the list (if you want to deal with ties, you'll need to extend this).

share|improve this answer
    
This works perfectly, thank you very much! –  Dan Jul 22 '12 at 5:42

Your code works for me: http://ideone.com/CKNZb

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm thats weird. I tried again and noticed that sometimes it works and sometime it doesn't. I also have conditions if there are 6 of a kind, 5 of a kind, etc etc. I put the code in the first post. It gives me the Sorry you lose message about half the time that it should give me the you win 3x message –  Dan Jul 21 '12 at 6:36
    
This was a case of you not posting enough code, as Marco pointed out. :) –  Amber Jul 21 '12 at 17:46

While I think some of the other answers have given an alternative implementation, I think it might be useful to see how your current algorithm could be fixed:

    for i in slotScreen:
        if slotScreen.count(i) == 6:
            print('You win 10x your bet!!!')
            x = x + int(bet) * 10
            break

        elif slotScreen.count(i) == 5:
            print('You win 5x your bet!')
            x = x + int(bet) * 5
            break

        elif slotScreen.count(i) == 4:
            print('You win 4x your bet!')
            x = x + int(bet) * 4
            break

        elif slotScreen.count(i) == 3:
            print('You win 3x your bet!')
            x = x + int(bet) * 3
            break

        # no else clause on the if statement, because we can't tell if you've lost yet

    else:  # this else block is attached to the for, and runs if no break was hit
        print('Sorry you lose')

This uses the somewhat obscure else clause that you can put after a for loop. The else block will be run only if the loop runs to completion, rather than being exited early by a break statement. That means that the "you lose" code only happens after all the values in the list have been checked. Note that you could actually stop earlier, since if you've checked the first 4 values in a six-long list, you can't find any three-of-a-kinds in the last two values.

There are some other minor improvements you can make, such as only running slotScreen.count(i) once per cycle through the loop and saving it to a variable that can be tested by each of the if/elif tests.

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Use a dict comprehension to make a histogram, then check it.

>>> L = ['cherry', 'lemon', 'lemon', 'bar', 'bar', 'bar']
>>> d = {f: L.count(f) for f in set(L)}
>>> for fruit in d:
        if d[fruit] > 2:
            print("You got {} {}'s! You win!").format(d[fruit], fruit)

You got 3 bar's! You win!

This code may seem cryptic now, but once you learn to read and understand list and dictionary comprehensions they are much easier to use and less error prone.

Here is the dictionary that is created and then named as d. It has each fruit as a key with a count for the value:

>>> {f: L.count(f) for f in set(L)}
{'cherry': 1, 'lemon': 2, 'bar': 3}

The for loop in python can be used to loop through the keys of the dictionary just as easily as items in a list or any other iterable. You can then use each key to access the count value and test it.

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You could try converting to a set, then comparing.

def contains_multiple(iterable):
    return len(a) != len(set(a) )

a = [1, 1]
b = [1, 2]

contains_multiple(a) # true
contains_multiple(b) # False

To avoid errors when a list contains some unhashable item, the following should solve the problem:

def unique(iterable):
    try:
        unique_items = set(iterable)
    except:
        unique_items = []
        for item in iterable:
            if item not in unique_items:
                unique_items.append(item)

    return unique_items

def contains_multiple(iterable):
    return len(iterable) != len(unique(iterable) )
share|improve this answer
    
sets are unordered, so this won't work consistently. On my system (and probably yours, given your example), passing [2,1] to your function will get True returned (but I'm on Python 3, where hash randomization makes this perhaps not consistent even between runs on the same system). Did you mean to use len(a) != len(set(a)) perhaps? –  Blckknght Jul 13 '13 at 3:54
    
That's true, I fixed it, thanks for the comment. –  johntex Jul 13 '13 at 22:08

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