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As summarised in my title, I was wondering whether expressions involving constants defined at instantiation get simplified during compile-time?

For example, I have a heap class where I have a final boolean isMinHeap whose value is set in the heap's constructor. The heap's methods then use this boolean in certain places. Can the compiler optimise this to simplify all these expressions that involve this boolean, or are the expressions computed in full every time a method is called?

Thanks!

EDIT: Because someone asked me for a more concrete example, here is a method that is called every time a node is removed from the heap (to assist with re-heapifying the tree):

private boolean requiresRepositioningDown(BTNode<T> node)
{
    boolean childIsSmaller = (node.getLeft().getValue().compareTo(
            node.getValue()) < 0)
            || (node.getRight() != null && node.getRight().getValue().compareTo(
                    node.getValue()) < 0);
    if (isMinHeap && childIsSmaller || !isMinHeap && !childIsSmaller)
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}

The expression with isMinHeap here would seem to get evaluated in full every time, whereas if the heap was made a max-heap at instantiation, the whole right-side of the expression could (and should) just be ignored.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It very likely won't. First of all, it's still not constant for the class at compile time; there can be still two instances where it differs. And that sort of optimisation is usually left to the JIT compiler.

Even if your constant is never set to anything else this will not be optimised. E.g.

public class Heap {
    final boolean isMinHeap;
    public Heap() {
        isMinHeap = true;
    }
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        if (isMinHeap) return "Min!";
        return "Not Min";
    }
}

compiles to

  public java.lang.String toString();
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: getfield      #2                  // Field isMinHeap:Z
       4: ifeq          10
       7: ldc           #3                  // String Min!
       9: areturn
      10: ldc           #4                  // String Not Min
      12: areturn

Note that the conditional is still there. The JIT compiler might opt to remove it completely if the method is used often since it should know that the final member cannot change. But that's a bit hard to observe.

If you immediately set isMinHeap to a value, though, and not do it in a constructor, then the optimisation is performed:

public class Heap {
    final boolean isMinHeap = true;
    public Heap() {
    }
    @Override
    public String toString() {
        if (isMinHeap) return "Min!";
        return "Not Min";
    }
}

compiles toString to:

  public java.lang.String toString();
    Code:
       0: ldc           #3                  // String Min!
       2: areturn
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In the first example, what if you declare the class itself as final? –  CAFxX Jul 21 '12 at 10:01
    
No change regarding the conditional. –  Joey Jul 21 '12 at 11:13
    
That definitely sounds like a missed optimization... –  CAFxX Jul 21 '12 at 16:16

The original source-to-bytecode compiler can't optimize for values which are only known at execution time. Such a value isn't really a "constant" in the normal use of the term. Genuinely constant expressions which can be simplified at compile-time are simplified, I believe - so if you have:

public static final int FOO = 10;
public static final int BAR = 20;

...

System.out.println(FOO * BAR):

I believe the multiplication will be performed at compile-time. However, that isn't possible in the case you describe, because they're not compile-time constants.

The JIT compiler may be able to spot common expressions, but you'd have to give us a more concrete example (in code, rather than just a description) to allow any kind of certainty.

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The relevant part of the JLS is § 15.28. –  Joachim Sauer Jul 21 '12 at 8:24
    
Added an example to my post like you suggested. –  ecl3ctic Jul 22 '12 at 1:42

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