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I have a library that is used in a wpf mef application. Included in this library are a number of files. One of them is app.js.

How do I read app.js from the library as a string.

PS: From an earlier code, I can access/create a bitmap image using the code below:

private readonly BitmapImage _starImageSmall = new BitmapImage(new Uri("pack://application:,,,/MyFirstExtension;component/Star_16x16.png", UriKind.Absolute));

After generating the Uri, how do I get access to the stream as the system stream?

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You mention it is a MEF application. Does that mean you'd prefer to make these resource files available via MEF exports? For the moment, I've ignored MEF in my answer below because it is not clear how it is (or should be) involved. –  Wim Coenen Jul 21 '12 at 20:28
    
@WimCoenen No. I'm actually writing an extension for WebMatrix and since it is using MEF, I thought it will be necessary to mention it. Both Cole and your solution gave me what I needed. –  ritcoder Jul 22 '12 at 9:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This block of code has never failed me:

private Stream GetEmbeddedResourceStream(string resourceName)
{
    Assembly assy = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly();
    string[] res = assy.GetManifestResourceNames();
    for (int i = 0; i < res.Length; i++)
    {
        if (res[i].ToLower().IndexOf(resourceName.ToLower()) != -1)
        {
            return assy.GetManifestResourceStream(res[i]);
        }
    }
    return Stream.Null;
}

Three things to note with this code block:

  • This block works on the executing assembly (Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly()), not the calling assembly or any other assembly; change it to suit your needs (see below for alternative)
  • resourceName should be the filename only (e.g. If your file is saved at resources/myRes.bin, you call GetEmbeddedResourceStream("myRes.bin")
  • Your resource must have its "Resource Type" set to "Embedded Resource"

If, however, you want the code to work on arbitrary assemblies, you can change the code block to:

private Stream GetEmbeddedResourceStream(string resourceName)
{
    return GetEmbeddedResourceName(resourceName, Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());
}
private Stream GetEmbeddedResourceStream(string resourceName, Assembly assembly)
{
    string[] res = assembly.GetManifestResourceNames();
    for (int i = 0; i < res.Length; i++)
    {
        if (res[i].ToLower().IndexOf(resourceName.ToLower()) != -1)
        {
            return assembly.GetManifestResourceStream(res[i]);
        }
    }
    return Stream.Null;
}
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Works great. Is there any reason for the return statement at the end of the function? –  ritcoder Jul 22 '12 at 9:51
    
@ritcoder so the compiler doesn't throw a fit and in case the file doesn't exist –  Cole Johnson Jul 22 '12 at 16:02
    
Brilliant! I have noticed that in my library project the file needs to be "Embedded Resource". I tried "Content" and "Resource", and neither worked. –  Hong Dec 16 '14 at 12:21
    
@Hong good point. I forgot to mention that in my answer –  Cole Johnson Dec 21 '14 at 18:34

You can open resource streams in an assembly with Assembly.GetManifestResourceStream. If you are unsure of the name of the resource, you can enumerate the resources names with Assembly.GetManifestResourceNames.

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