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I have a task which, when completed, is supposed to continue with another task that shows a winform (the winform was previously initialised on the UI thread, so it does have a handle).

    private static Task RunningTask
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
    public static UpdaterTool.Forms.UpdateResult UpdateResultForm;

    private void DoWork()
    {
        UpdateResultForm = new Forms.UpdateResult(); 
        //the next line forces the creation of the handle - 
        //otherwise InvokeRequired will later on return false.
        var hackHandle = UpdateResultForm.Handle; 

        var ctx = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();

        RunningTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => DownloadAndInstallFiles(), CancelTokenSource.Token)
            .ContinueWith(_ => WorkComplete(), CancelTokenSource.Token, TaskContinuationOptions.NotOnFaulted, ctx);
    }

    private void WorkComplete()
    {
       ShowResultForm();
    }

    private void ShowResultForm()
    {
        if (UpdateResultForm.InvokeRequired)
        {
            try
            {
                UpdateResultForm.Invoke(new MethodInvoker(ShowResultForm));
            }
            catch { }
            return;
         }
         UpdateResultForm.Show();

     }

The problem is that no matter what combination of overloads for the ContinueWith() I use, the UpdateResultForm is either not shown at all(meaning the continuation does not happen, the worker hangs at "running"), or when it is, it hangs the UI, like its expecting the worker thread to finish or something. I dont understand why this happens when I tried to show it on the UI thread, by using FromCurrentSynchronizationContext().

In my understanding, inside the DoWork method I start on the UI thread (which is why I initialise the form there). When the code enters Task.Factory.StartNew, it switches to the working thread. When it completes, it continues with WorkComplete which just shows the previously initialised form, on the UI thread.

What am I missing? Thanks,

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1  
How do you call DoWork()? Do you call it from the UI thread? –  svick Jul 21 '12 at 10:24
    
I think yes, its called from the UI thread. Code will follow in comment, sorry, cant format it: On events (app start, and button click) I do this:"UpdatesManager manager = new UpdatesManager();manager.PerformUpdate();" - then the PerformUpdate() method does some checks, and calls DoWork(). –  Amc_rtty Jul 21 '12 at 11:12
1  
FWIW, BackgroundWorker automatically runs progress and completed delegates on the UI thread for you –  James Manning Jul 21 '12 at 13:47
    
In WinForms, you would usually do the InvokeRequired/Invoke pattern - see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms171728.aspx –  James Manning Jul 21 '12 at 13:51
1  
BackgroundWorker link (won't let me edit the above comment since it's been more than 5 minutes) here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  James Manning Jul 21 '12 at 13:54
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using InvokeRequired is a strong anti-pattern. It's not that common to have no idea on what thread a method runs. That's the case here as well, you already used TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() so you know that the task runs on the UI thread. There's no point in checking again. Which also eliminates the need to create the form handle early.

The kind of problems you are having can be caused by running DoWork() from a worker thread. Maybe you called it from a task as well. Which makes FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() return the wrong context. And will display the form on a thread that doesn't pump a message loop, it will be dead as a doornail. Or by blocking the UI thread, waiting for the task to finish. That will always cause deadlock, the task cannot complete unless the UI thread goes idle and can execute the ShowResultForm() method.

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Thank you for your answer, it helped me understand the problems in my code better. Your assumption is correct - i used inspect threads and set a breakpoint on entering the DoWork method - when execution enters this method, current thread IS a worker. What I dont understand, is why on earth does this happen. Maybe its because when app starts there is no winform visible (only a system tray icon), and it calls DoWork immediately. Also, there is only one Task in this application, and it is created inside DoWork. DoWork itself, is not called by a parent Task. –  Amc_rtty Jul 21 '12 at 17:31
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I think the solution to this is: Is DoWork() called on any Thread other than the UI Thread?

If yes, then consider instantiating the UpdateResultForm somwhere on the UI Thread or if this is not possible then somwhere within your ContinueWith operation.

If no then there shouldn't be a problem. The UpdateResultForm.Handle could have caused some trouble. However, this handle is no longer needed in this case, as you are on the UI Thread already and therefore don't have to check wether Invoke is required or not.

In any of both cases you could try rewriting your DoWork method like this:

     private void DoWork()
            {
                var ctx = TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext();

                RunningTask = Task.Factory
                    .StartNew(DownloadAndInstallFiles, CancelTokenSource.Token)
                    .ContinueWith(_ => ShowResultForm(), CancelTokenSource.Token, TaskContinuationOptions.NotOnFaulted, ctx);
            }

            private void ShowResultForm()
            {
                UpdateResultForm = new Forms.UpdateResult();
                // Some other code
                UpdateResultForm.Show();
            }

Even WorkComplete is no longer required as it merely passes the call thru. Hope this will help you.

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If you're using SynchronizationContext then you don't need the InvokeRequired/Invoke. The only way you can run into the problem you're seeing here is if DoWork is invoked on a thread other than the UI thread.

e.g. if I take the code you provided, create my own UpdateResult form, add a CancelTokenSource member and initialize it in the constructor, and run DoWork from the UI thread, it works fine.

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You are correct, I just discovered that when entering DoWork, current thread was a worker one. So now the question is, how can I be sure I call DoWork from the UI thread, considering that my app upon startup does not have a form, but only a systray icon, and it starts the update procedure immediately (which, as I see in inspect threads window, creates worker threads; these workers are made by the app, not initialised by me explicitly)? Thank you. –  Amc_rtty Jul 21 '12 at 17:51
    
Well, honestly, you're writing the code to call DoWork, just call it correctly. Adding something to DoWork to ensure it's called from the UI thread doesn't seem to add much value when you can simply call DoWork properly--which is what I would recommend. –  Peter Ritchie Jul 21 '12 at 19:02
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I solved it. The answers on this thread are all correct, the issue here was, just like Hans suggested, that FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() was returning a wrong context instead of the expected UI one. This happened because DoWork was called from a worker thread, and not from the UI one.

The solution here in my particular case, was to call DoWork from a UI context, which means I had to make a WindowsFormsSynchronizationContext object just like this blog post explains.

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