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(function(){
    var privateSomething = "Boom!";
    var fn = function(){}
    fn.addFunc = function(obj) {
        alert('Yeah i can do this: '+privateSomething);
        for(var i in obj) fn[i] = obj[i];
    }
    window.fn=fn;
})();

fn.addFunc({
    whereAmI:function()
    {
        alert('Nope I\'ll get an error here: '+privateSomething);
    }
});

fn.whereAmI();

Why can't whereAmI() access privateSomething? and how do i place whereAmI() in the same context as addFunc()?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Javascript is lexically scoped: a name refers to variables based on where the name is defined, not where the name is used. privateSomething is looked for as a local in whereAmI, and then in the global scope. It isn't found in either of those places.

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JavaScript has lexical scoping, not dynamic scoping (apart from this). See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scope_(computer_science)#Lexical_scoping_and_dynamic_scoping

share|improve this answer
    
this is a keyword not a variable. It has nothing to do with scope. – Esailija Jul 21 '12 at 11:59
    
Gotcha. So no go on getting at that variable huh? – lilturtle Jul 21 '12 at 11:59
    
this is a reference to an object (or undefined), and it is resolved dynamically. – King Mob Jul 21 '12 at 13:20
1  
i think this is a keyword and everything to do with scope. – lilturtle Jul 21 '12 at 17:49

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