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I have created one bucket which will be used to store data for all my users. The structure of the directories is as follows :

--> BUCKET_NAME/USER_IDENTIFIER/CREATION_DATE/OBJET_ID

==> Is it possible with gsutil or through the API to get the overall size for each of the users ?

For example, if USER X is identified by "USER_1", I'd like to get the size of all objects under BUCKET_NAME/USER_1

Would be great if someone has an idea how to implement this ? Using standard file name, it would be rather easy but I couldn't find an easy way to implement this with Google Cloud Storage.

Thanks,

Hugues

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can now use a native gsutil command for that:

To print the total number of bytes in a bucket, in human-readable form:

gsutil du -ch gs://bucketname

source: https://developers.google.com/storage/docs/gsutil/commands/du

It returns a total per "folder" and a global total, which is super convenient!

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There isn't an API for that, you will need to keep the bookkeeping per user your self.
You can request all the files under a certain key and sum the total files size but this process is (very) slow.

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Whouw that was quick ! Thanks for the feedback Shay. –  Hugues Jul 21 '12 at 13:09

If user names are regularly structured you could write a script like this:

for user_id in {0..100}; do;
    echo USER ${user_id}: $(gsutil ls -l gs://BUCKET_NAME/$user_id/**) 
done

This will print the number of objects and total data size for each user (assuming your user IDs are simple numeric values).

If you have a large number of objects for each user this process can be very slow, as Shay noted.

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