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Had a complicated program that kept throwing up the missing default constructor error, and after much tinkering, i found the exact same scenario that gives the same error. What's wrong with this?

class B;

class A
{
public:
    A() {instance = new B;}
    virtual ~A() {delete instance;}
private:
    A*instance;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B(){}
}

can't forward declare a derived class to be used within the base class?

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4  
Of course, once you get this to compile, you'll end up with an infinite loop... –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 21 '12 at 16:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

How can new B succeed if the compiler doesn't know anything about class B yet? If you move the member function implementations out of class A below the definition of class B, it should work:

class A
{
public:
    A();
    virtual ~A();
private:
    A * instance;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B(){}
};

A::A()
{
    instance = new B;
}

A::~A()
{
    delete instance;
}

What exactly are A and B, anyway? Having a base class instantiate a derived class sure is a bit unusual.

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ah your right. Always forget to make sure declares and defines are separate to avoid stuff like this. thanks! Will accept when i can –  FatalCatharsis Jul 21 '12 at 16:01
    
Yeh, i imagined i would get asked :P. class A is actually a singleton, which represents a base class for any of it's derived classes the singleton can be, an it derives a from a factory that catalogues and can instantiate any of it's derived classes from corresponding string indices. needed B because if you try and instantiate the singleton using an invalid string, then it needs a default to use, so that the reference returned from the getsingleton function wouldn't point to nothing. it's a bit overcomplicated i know, just doing some experimenting in my free time :P –  FatalCatharsis Jul 21 '12 at 16:06
    
... if by work you mean compile and create an infinite loop at runtime... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 21 '12 at 16:12
    
A Singleton base class? Do you have so many Singletons in your program that you want a common base class to reduce code duplication? A better technical solution would probably be a Singleton class template instead. But that only solves the technical problem, not the design problem. A better design would get rid of the imagined need for all those Singletons. If you type "Singleton" into a search engine, you will find many good reasons to avoid Singletons. Even its creators admit the Singleton Design Pattern was a huge mistake. Cure yourself of Singletonitis now. Just say no to Singletons! –  fredoverflow Jul 21 '12 at 16:14
    
not a singleton base class, it's more like the interface object that performs an operation also acts as a singleton to contain an instance of any of it's derived classes. The derived objects do not derive it's singleton functionality. Yes i've read numerous articles about singletons, so i'm exploring there pros and cons myself. I've never been one to take things on faith :P. So far though, i've yet to encounter any of the difficulties, and until then, i'll continue experimenting. –  FatalCatharsis Jul 21 '12 at 16:36

You need to put the definition (but not the declaration) of A's constructor outside A, after the definition of B. Using B in A is OK as long as you don't need it to be complete (fully defined) - and new B definitely does.

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c++ rules about how forward the compiler is going to look are not obvious (for example it's ok to use instance in a method even if the member is defined later in the class but it's not ok to use a class defined later in the same source file).

In this case the problem (as the other reported) is that when compiling new B the compiler must know more about B than just it's a class and it will not keep reading past the class A to look what a B really is.

One possible solution is to put the definition of A constructor and destructor later (still leaving them inlined):

class B;

class A
{
public:
    A();
    virtual ~A();
private:
    A *instance;
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B() {}
};

inline A::A() { instance = new B; }
inline A::~A() { delete instance; }

This compiles but however will not run correctly because indeed what you're trying to do here is quite confused.

To create an instance of A you want to create an instance of B, but B is a specialization of A and therefore when you create an instance of B you will be also creating an instance of A (the A base sub-object of B).

This means that to create an instance of A you need indirectly to create an instance of A.

Sounds loopy, doesn't it?

Instantiating an instance of A (or of B) with this code will lead to infinite recursion (i.e. a strange crash on most implementations).

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No. Because the derived class may contain additional elements. so you cant use that to initialize base class object with derived class object.

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