Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Additional requirements:

  • Input of the function are two numbers, not necessarily integers

  • Speed is the major concern; it should be as fast as possible

  • Doesn't have to be secure, as long as its output looks sufficiently random.

Examples:

getValue(0,0) -> 0.326458921
getValue(100,30) -> 0.598713621
getValue(5.12687, 600.471536) -> 0.21458796

Edit To clarify: the output values should be deterministic, but random-looking.

share|improve this question
4  
To clarify; are you looking for a hash function? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 21 '12 at 16:33
    
I think so. But I want it to output a value uniformly distributed between 0 and 1. –  user1542912 Jul 21 '12 at 16:36
1  
What have you tried and where are you stuck? We wont just do the coding for you! –  Sirko Jul 21 '12 at 16:37
1  
@user1542912, sounds like you're wanting not only deterministic algorithm, but a unique result for each input set. –  Jonathan M Jul 21 '12 at 17:02
1  
Yes - I don't think the word "random" has a place here :-) –  Pointy Jul 21 '12 at 17:03

3 Answers 3

Don't know if this fits your needs, this is just an idea I had spontaneously (using a JavaScript implementation of Java's String.hashCode(), taken from this website: http://werxltd.com/wp/2010/05/13/javascript-implementation-of-javas-string-hashcode-method/)

<script>
    String.prototype.hashCode = function(){
        var hash = 0;
        if (this.length == 0) return hash;
        for (i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
            char = this.charCodeAt(i);
            hash = ((hash<<5)-hash)+char;
            hash = hash & hash; // Convert to 32bit integer
        }
        return hash;
    }

    function hash(x, y) {
        var hash = Math.abs((x + "" + y).hashCode())
        return hash / Math.pow(10, (hash + "").length);
    }

    alert(hash(5.12687, 600.471536));
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't look very random to me hash(0,0) //0.1536 hash(0,1) //0.1537 hash(0,2) //0.1538 hash(0,3) //0.1539 –  Esailija Jul 21 '12 at 16:56
    
Not supposed to be random. The OP revised requirements, saying it should be deterministic. –  Jonathan M Jul 21 '12 at 17:00
    
I meant pseudo-random. That is technically also deterministic, right? –  user1542912 Jul 21 '12 at 17:06
    
@user1542912 yes, you mean that (0,0) should always give the same result, but (0,1) would give very different result compared to 0,0 or 0,2. I.E "Random looking", right? –  Esailija Jul 21 '12 at 17:08
    
Exactly. And as you pointed out, this code doesn't seem to achieve that. –  user1542912 Jul 21 '12 at 17:09

You can write a hash function :

function hash(x, y) {
    // You cast the int parts and decimal parts of your entries as 16-bits signed integers.
    var xi = x & 0xFFFF;
    var xf = (((x-xi) * (1 << 16)) & 0xFFFF);
    var yi = y & 0xFFFF;
    var yf = (((y-yi) * (1 << 16)) & 0xFFFF);

    // You hash theses numbers
    var r1 = ((39769 * xi) & 0xFFFF);
    r1 = ((r1 + xf) * 23747) & 0xFFFF;
    r1 = ((r1 + yi) * 19073) & 0xFFFF;
    r1 = ((r1 + yf) * 25609) & 0xFFFF;

    var r2 = ((25609 * xf) & 0xFFFF);
    r2 = ((r2 + yf) * 39769) & 0xFFFF;
    r2 = ((r2 + xi) * 23747) & 0xFFFF;
    r2 = ((r2 + yi) * 19073) & 0xFFFF;

    // And returns a floating number between 0 and 1.
    return ((r1&0xFF)/(1<<24)) + ((r2&0xFFFF)/(1<<16));
}

This function wrap each 65536, as I only keep the first 16 bits of the int part, but the idea is here, you can modify the hash function. A much better way would be :

var arrayBuffer = new ArrayBuffer(8);
var dataView = new DataView(arrayBuffer);

function hash(x, y) {
    dataView.setFloat32(0, x);
    dataView.setFloat32(4, y);

    var xi = dataView.getUint16(0);
    var xf = dataView.getUint16(2);
    var yi = dataView.getUint16(4);
    var yf = dataView.getUint16(6);

    // You hash theses numbers
    var r1 = ((39769 * xi) & 0xFFFF);
    r1 = ((r1 + xf) * 23747) & 0xFFFF;
    r1 = ((r1 + yi) * 19073) & 0xFFFF;
    r1 = ((r1 + yf) * 25609) & 0xFFFF;

    var r2 = ((25609 * xf) & 0xFFFF);
    r2 = ((r2 + yf) * 39769) & 0xFFFF;
    r2 = ((r2 + xi) * 23747) & 0xFFFF;
    r2 = ((r2 + yi) * 19073) & 0xFFFF;

    // And returns a floating number between 0 and 1.
    dataView.setUint16(0, r1);
    dataView.setUint16(2, r2);
    return Math.abs(dataView.getFloat32(0) % 1);
}

This last method use WebGL TypedArray, which lets you have access to bits of your entries, and have a way better hash. But, from my experience, this is really slower (800 millions calls/sec for the first method on my computer, only 2 millions for the second one - for information, the classic random function is 200 millions calls/sec), and WebGL may not be available on all browsers.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! Can you point me to a good resource explaining this kind of algorithms? Where do the numbers 39769, 23747,... come from? –  user1542912 Jul 27 '12 at 8:50
    
At least when the output is quantized to 0-255 integer range (for outputting a color), it seems to have rather short and obvious pattern: jsfiddle.net/aTuGs/2 :( –  Tapio Oct 8 '12 at 7:01
unsigned int hash(int key) {
    key +=~(key << 15);
    key ^=(key >> 10);
    key +=(key << 3);
    key ^=(key >> 6);
    key +=~(key << 11);
    key ^=(key >> 16);
    return key;
}

unsigned int localseed = hash(x^hash(y^baseSeed));

This uses a baseSeed value, but that's optional. Basically creates a hash from x/y coordinates.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.