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Can I use user defined type, say a class inside using block ? When I used:

  1. It said, I need to inherit IDisposable and implement Dispose method. I inherited and tried to define Dispose method, I couldn't. It shows me its not public or something :( Please help me understand this with a small code on how can I achieve it.

  2. If I create an instance of a class inside the "using" brackets, although the scope of this variable is only within that using block, why the heck I cannot create another instance of the same class with the same variable outside the using ? I see no good reason for that :( Is my reasoning correct ? But I could use the same variable for instantiating another class outside the using(Is that ok to do ? As I see no compile errors), although I am well aware that we should practise coding guideline (But conceptually I am seeking logic)....

Please help, I am new to C#

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1  
+1 WRT to point 2, there is a group of people (including me) that does not agree with the limited lexical scoping of C#. This will probably never change. –  leppie Jul 21 '12 at 17:02
1  
What exactly is the "strange" behavior your title refers to? –  Jon Skeet Jul 21 '12 at 17:07
    
@JonSkeet: Sorry, may be I need to correct my title, really unsure how can I correct the title...sorry for using "strange" word. –  Deevinee Jul 21 '12 at 17:13
1  
@Divine: Hit the "edit" button on your post –  Jon Skeet Jul 21 '12 at 17:14
    
@JonSkeet: Thank you, done that :) –  Deevinee Jul 21 '12 at 18:14

1 Answer 1

The whole point of the using statement is to call the Dispose method specified in the IDisposable interface.

And yes, when implementing an interface, either the method needs to be public or you need to use explicit interface implementation:

// Via a public method
public class Foo : IDisposable
{
    public void Dispose()
    {
        // Stuff
    }
}

// Via explicit interface implementation
public class Bar : IDisposable
{
    void IDisposable.Dispose()
    {
        // Stuff
    }
}

There's nothing specific about IDisposable here - it's just normal interface implementation.

You shouldn't implement IDisposable just for the sake of it though - the idea is that it should be cleaning up for you - if you don't have any clean-up to perform, you don't need the using statement either.

As for the second point: you're simply not allowed to declare a local variable with the same name as another local variable which is still in scope. It would be very confusing to read, hence it's prohibited. From section 8.5.1 of the C# spec:

The scope of a local variable declared in a local-variable-declaration is the block in which the declaration occurs. It is an error to refer to a local variable in a textual position that precedes the local-variable-declarator of the local variable. Within the scope of a local variable, it is a compile-time error to declare another local variable or constant with the same name.

Note that you can still have the same local variable name twice in one method, provided they're not both in scope at the same time:

void M()
{
    using (Stream x = ...)
    {
    }

    using (Stream x = ...)
    {
    }

    for (int x = 0; x < 10; x++)
    {
    }

    // Block introduced just for scoping...
    {
        string x = "";
        ...
    }
}
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Thank you so much Jon Skeet. Well your first point now gave me no compile error, great. But I am wondering or dont understand, how should I achieve the same inbuilt cleaning process which is similar to when I use this "using" for sql connection, I call the methodname.Dispose() in finally. Meaning, I understand that the SQL class has given some implementation in that inbuilt ? Cant I use something same without me cwriting code for cleaning ? In this case preferably where I use user defined class... ? –  Deevinee Jul 21 '12 at 17:08
    
@Divine: It's not at all clear what you mean. A using statement is absolutely equivalent to calling Dispose in a finally block - except it's easier to read and maintain. I have no idea whether the type that you're writing even needs any clean-up code... but if it does, you need to write that yourself. It's not clear which SQL class you're even talking about, but if it's something which implements IDisposable, it will include appropriate code to clean up its resources. –  Jon Skeet Jul 21 '12 at 17:10
    
Also, as far second point is concerned, well I now used the same variable for instantiating another class, it gives me error :( Well I completely understand coding guidelines as you say and readability point of view, but I am trying to understand, the variable in using scope is only between { and } right ? Meaning, I cant use that variable outside using scope and even if I use, it gives me exception ? Right ? Why cant I use the same variable name atleast for different class instantiation ? :( –  Deevinee Jul 21 '12 at 17:11
1  
@Divine: It doesn't give you an exception, it gives you a compile-time error. Exceptions are very different. You can't use the same variable name because it would be confusing - the language is trying to protect you from yourself. It's bad enough when you've got a local variable and an instance variable called the same thing - having two local variables in scope with the same name at the same time would be even worse. –  Jon Skeet Jul 21 '12 at 17:15
    
Hi Jon, thank you so much for your detailed way of using variables. but the scope of variable I am trying to understand is using(Class c = new Class()) { }; // here, c's scope is only inside using right ? then why cant I reuse derived c = new derived(); ????? –  Deevinee Jul 21 '12 at 18:23

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