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The basic idea is as follows:

a request comes to views1 and it first returns the username. There is some heavy job separate done by do_something_else right after views1 is done. You can think of this as creating a new user, but has to do some heavy checking on the background.

def views1(..):
   username = get_uername(...)
   return username

from lib import do_something_else
def do_something_else(...):
   // do heavy stuff here

gevent.joinall([
   gevent.spawn(views1, parmeter1, parmeter2, ...),
   gevent.spawn(do_something_else, parmeter1, parmeter2, ...)
])

The problem is I don't think do_something_else was ever called based on my logging. I read tutorial and I don't know where to place gevent.sleep(0). I don't want blocking. I want the user sees the username right away, and let do_something_else runs in the background.

Any idea?

share|improve this question
    
Important advice: take little extra time to make isolated test of your problem, that will make problem clear and you more professional. – Alex Jul 23 '12 at 10:17

It is important to understand that you need to separate 'heavy load' processing into thread pool [1].

Every processing that takes place in gevent thread (and you can have one gevent HUB per native thread) must be focused just on processing network requests and sending responses.

from gevent import spawn, run
from gevent.threadpool import ThreadPool
from time import sleep as heavy_load, time as now

class Globals:
    jobs = 4
    index = 0
    greenlets = []
    pool = ThreadPool(3) # change size of the pool appropriately

start = now()

def get_uername():
    heavy_load(0.1)
    Globals.index += 1
    return "Alex {0}".format(Globals.index)

def do_something_else(username):
    heavy_load(2.0)
    print "Heavy job done for", username, now() - start

def views1():
    "a request comes to views1 and it first returns the username"
    username = get_uername()
    ## There is some heavy job separate done by do_something_else right after views1 is done
    Globals.greenlets.append( 
        Globals.pool.spawn(do_something_else, username) 
        )
    # return username
    print "Returned requested username", username, now() - start


if __name__ == '__main__':
    ## simulate clients 
    for job_index in xrange(Globals.jobs):
        Globals.greenlets.append( spawn(views1) )

    ## wait for all tasks to complete
    # for greenlet in Globals.greenlets:
        # try:
            # greenlet.join()
        # except AttributeError, e:
            # greenlet.get()
    run()
    print "Test done", now() - start

This is output of the test:

python threadpool_test.py
Returned requested username Alex 1 0.101000070572
Returned requested username Alex 2 0.201999902725
Returned requested username Alex 3 0.302999973297
Returned requested username Alex 4 0.40299987793
Heavy job done for Alex 1 2.10100007057
Heavy job done for Alex 2 2.2009999752
Heavy job done for Alex 3 2.3029999733
Heavy job done for Alex 4 4.10299992561
Test done 4.10500001907

Notice how all requests are completed first and in parallel do_something_else tasks are done in batches of size 3.

When ThreadPool is not used every request would take additional time introduced by do_something_else and that is not asynchronous programming that gevent has to offer. In that case output would look like this:

Heavy job done for Alex 1 2.10100007057
Returned requested username Alex 1 2.10100007057
Heavy job done for Alex 2 4.2009999752
Returned requested username Alex 2 4.20199990273
Heavy job done for Alex 3 6.30200004578
Returned requested username Alex 3 6.3029999733
Heavy job done for Alex 4 8.40299987793
Returned requested username Alex 4 8.40400004387
Test done 8.40400004387

Notice how 4th request was completed ater 8.4 seconds instead 0.4 seconds when handled asynchronously.

[1] http://code.google.com/p/gevent/source/browse/examples/threadpool.py

share|improve this answer
    
Fantasic. I will have to try to implement this tomorrow. Three questions. One, what exactly does job means? Is that the number of requests coming in (how does the number affect my usage?) Two, can you claify your last point When ThreadPool ....? Are you saying that we have no idea when the job is completed because there is no job id return like a task queue? Is that what you mean gevent does not do aysn? I might misunderstood what gevent offers. Thanks – user423455 Jul 24 '12 at 4:18
    
Job means some background/parallel processor-heavy-lifting, jobs == 4 is number of requests (also number of do_something_else calls). I have edited the answer to include output for the case when you by mistake call do_something_else() while processing request. Do you see how that affects responses ? – Alex Jul 24 '12 at 16:28
    
Ahh. Thanks. It's clear. Now, the most important question.... it might be dumb, but where exactly do I put greenlets.append(spawn(view1)) ? I use Pylon and Django. They are both served with gunicorn. This is something that I don't quite get ... where exactly do I put that piece of call so that whenever a request comes in (hitting this particular view, say, get_username), it spawns? I used to put that code in my views.py (or controller class if it's Plyons). – user423455 Jul 25 '12 at 3:22
    
You don`t. in a gevent based framework I would just spawn() away and expect it to execute properly. Globals.greenlets is there just to show you how one can join() to all spawned greenlets or let gevent.run() do that for you. – Alex Jul 25 '12 at 9:42

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