Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm working through the example at http://dojotoolkit.org/documentation/tutorials/1.7/hello_dojo/demo/module.html and I've created a directory structure as follows

w:/djt2/index.html
w:/djt2/js/mymodule.js  (exact copy of http://dojotoolkit.org/documentation/tutorials/1.7/hello_dojo/demo/myModule.js)

I then set the Tinyweb web-server to serve localhost from w:/djt2

I've changed index.html a tiny bit, to adjust for putting mymodule.js inside the js subdirectory (I've removed comments too below):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8">
    <title>Tutorial: Hello Dojo!</title>

    <script>
        var dojoConfig = {
            async: true,
            packages: [{
                name: "djt2",
                location: '/js'     /* Location #1 */
            }]
        };
    </script>
    <script src="//ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/dojo/1.7.2/dojo/dojo.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
<h1 id="greeting">Hello</h1>
<script>
    require(["djt2/mymodule"], function(myModule){   /* Location #2 */
        myModule.setText("greeting", "Hello Dojo!");
        setTimeout(function(){
            myModule.restoreText("greeting");
        }, 3000);
    });
</script>
</body>
</html>

This works, but I'm not entirely sure I understand why... In particular, at Location #1, the original had location.pathname.replace(/\/[^/]+$/, '') which evaluates to the empty string and makes the loader look for mymodule.js at the CDN location (I also tried to set location to "/", but that made it search at http://mymodule.js/).

At Location #2 it is a little mystical that the prefix should be djt2/...

If someone could explain it, or direct me to the documentation (I'm a bit overwhelmed with learning a new framework :-).

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Add an extra djt2 directory in your structure

w:/djt2/js/djt2/mymodule.js

Set the baseUrl in the configuration.

var dojoConfig = {
    async: true,
    baseUrl: '/js'
    packages: [{
         name: "djt2",
         location: 'djt2'
    }]
};

Setting the baseUrl will tell dojo where to look for custom modules. The location that is part of the package is relative to the baseUrl.


I always think of modules/packages as namesapces. To extend your example with an additional package, it would look like the following:

w:/djt2/js/another/anotherModule.js

var dojoConfig = {
    async: true,
    baseUrl: '/js'
    packages: [{
         name: "djt2",
         location: 'djt2'
    }, {
         name: "another",
         location: 'another'
    }]
};
share|improve this answer
    
hmm.. that didn't work. It tried to fetch mymodule.js from http://localhost/djt2/js/djt2/mymodule.js, but since I'm serving from w:/djt2 there is no djt2 folder off of root. If I change baseUrl to just "/js" it works. If I change the baseUrl to "/js/djt2" and remove the packages definition it also works... –  thebjorn Jul 22 '12 at 13:46
    
I missed the part where localhost mapped to djt2. Yes, baseUrl should then be /js. Dojo will look for module definitions that begin with djt2 in the djt2 directory off of /js –  Craig Swing Jul 22 '12 at 14:37
    
/me wonders what will happen when a dijit or dojox is required, one that resides in the google cdn –  mschr Jul 23 '12 at 20:21
    
I have a sandbox app that uses CDN and has a custom module that is on the web server and it works fine. dojo, dijit and dojox are loaded from cdn. The custom module from the web server. –  Craig Swing Jul 23 '12 at 23:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.