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I am working on a template library which heavily relies on the use of the curiously recurring template pattern (primarily for static polymorphism). The idea is that to use it the user can either

1). Use predefined classes with standard methods, which are very simple leafs of the base class that only provide constructors/destructor, declare the variable members and declare the base class(es) as friend(s). All actual methods that operate on the variable members of the derived classes are defined in the base class(es).

2). Use the base classes to create his/her own extensions, which are very much alike the class described in 1)., but, obviously, this method also allows to add user defined methods that operate on the same variable members (in addition to the ones defined in the base class).

Whatever method the user chooses he only uses one level extension of the base class.

My question is primarily about the point 2). In the current implementation the user (and also the developer of the "standard" leafs) has to define all constructors implicitly (i.e. describe full process of memory allocation for dynamic variable members of the class, etc).

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Today, I decided to investigate my idea to use CRTP/static polymorphism in constructors of the base class to provide definition of the allocation of the memory of all heap variables of the derived class. I did some experiments on sample classes that I created for this exercise.

This is part of the base class

template<class TLeafType, class MyClass> class sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint {
 ...

//one of the base constructors
sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint(const MyClass& MyClassInstance) {
    std::cout << "Base additional constructor called" << std::endl;
    std::cout << asLeaf().Point << std::endl;
    asLeaf().Point=new MyClass(MyClassInstance);
    std::cout << asLeaf().Point << std::endl;
}

TLeafType& asLeaf(void) {
return static_cast<TLeafType&>(*this);
}

...
};

Then the derived class:

template<class MyClass> 
class sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint: public sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<MyClass>, MyClass> {
...
friend class sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<MyClass>, MyClass>;
private:
    MyClass* Point;
public:
    sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint(const MyClass& MyClassInstance): sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<MyClass>, MyClass>(MyClassInstance){
        std::cout << "Derived additional constructor called " << std::endl; 
        std::cout << Point << std::endl;
        std::cout << *Point << std::endl;
    }
...
}

Then in main

int a(5);
sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<int> A(a);

As expected, it gave the following output:

Base additional constructor called
0x847ff4
0x8737008
Derived additional constructor called 
0x8737008
5
Derived destructor called 
Base destructor called 

This suggests that, overall, the concept may be feasible. However, my first question is still about whether or not I fully understand all processes that happen here. I am primarily interested in the efficiency of the whole process, as I will need to be creating a substantial amount of the objects of the class described above and I am wondering what exactly happens with "Point" (are there no hidden redefinitions of where it points?)

The second question is regarding the use of the boost library for the definition of smart pointer for the variable member of the derived class. When I tried replacing the normal pointer with boost::shared_ptr, I received a segmentation fault error when trying to allocate memory for the member of the derived class through base class.

I present the important parts of the code that I used below:

This is part of the base class

template<class TLeafType, class MyClass> class sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint {
 ...

//one of the base constructors
sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint(const MyClass& MyClassInstance) {
    std::cout << "Base additional constructor called" << std::endl;
    std::cout << asLeaf().Point << std::endl;
    asLeaf().Point.reset(new MyClass(MyClassInstance));
    std::cout << asLeaf().Point << std::endl;
}

TLeafType& asLeaf(void) {
return static_cast<TLeafType&>(*this);
}

...
};

Then the derived class:

template<class MyClass> 
class sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint: public sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<MyClass>, MyClass> {
...
friend class sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<MyClass>, MyClass>;
private:
    boost::shared_ptr<MyClass> Point;
public:
    sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint(const MyClass& MyClassInstance): sysBaseDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<MyClass>, MyClass>(MyClassInstance){
        std::cout << "Derived additional constructor called " << std::endl; 
        std::cout << Point << std::endl;
        std::cout << *Point << std::endl;
    }
...
}

Then in main

int a(5);
sysDiscreteTrajectoryPoint<int> A(a);

This gives the following output:

Base additional constructor called
0x28d324
Segmentation fault

I have also tried scoped_ptr and it also failed at the run time but with invalid pointer error:

Base additional constructor called
*** glibc detected *** ./TestSystem: free(): invalid pointer: 0x00d3fff4 ***
======= Backtrace: =========
/lib/i386-linux-gnu/libc.so.6(+0x6b961)[0xc4e961]
...

I guess it is somehow related to the specifics of the operation of boost smart pointers. Does anyone know how to resolve this issue?

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2 Answers 2

How is it possible that you can access Point member belonging to the derived class from base constructor? When the base constructor is being invoked, the derived class part does not exist. Perhaps it works just "by accident".

But it certainly fails with shared_ptr, because you attempt to assign it before it has a chance to get initialized.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand that. This is why I said "I decided to investigate ..." in the beginning of the question :). However, it is definitely initialised in both cases, as when I print Point using std::cout it gives me a feasible output (address) in both cases. I am trying to understand why this whole thing happens and how/whether it can be used. –  user1391279 Jul 21 '12 at 20:13
    
@user1391279 instance member offsets are known statically, at compile-time - that's why you get feasible address. –  Igor R. Jul 21 '12 at 20:41

The address of the shared_ptr is known at compile time for the reasons given in the above answers, but the shared_ptr itself is still uninitialised because the derived-class constructor has not yet been called, and thus has not had a chance to implicitly call its instance members' constructors, including the default constructor for shared_ptr. Therefore, when you call reset() to assign the shared_ptr, it first tries to release (and possibly delete) the object at whatever spurious address it contains (to avoid leaking an existing referent) before assigning and referencing the new object. That first step, I believe, is what causes the segfault.

If the shared_ptr constructor ran first, it would null its contained raw pointer, preventing the subsequent reset() call from trying to release an object at the spurious address.

Using asLeaf() to access the derived class from the base-class constructor is inherently unsafe for non-POD types because construction is incomplete (the derived class's members are not yet constructed). This is, incidentally, why virtual method calls from a base constructor will never call overrides from more-derived classes - the language explicitly prevents overrides from being called until construction of the whole object is complete because in most cases the state of the whole object is not yet defined.

There may be better solutions for you, but one approach that would work would be to remove that initialization code from the base class's constructor and put it in an init() function that is called explicitly at every instantiation of the derived class. init() can still live in the base class, but it's safer because everything will have been initialized by the time it runs.

Side note: avoid putting small objects in shared_ptr without good reason. You might have a legitimate need for it in this case, but in general I prefer direct aggregation of members to single-owner pointers and single-owner pointers to shared pointers wherever possible because the overhead escalates. Single-owner pointers involve heap allocations, and shared pointers also add to this the cost of counting/tracking owners so that the object can be deleted when unreachable.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your reply - the idea about init() function is really good. Don't think there is a better way of doing this. –  user1391279 Jul 31 '12 at 16:43
    
No problem, glad I could help. –  TheJim Jul 31 '12 at 18:23

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