Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My application has a single point of entry let's call it index.php.

In index.php it instantiates a class like below;

final class Griff {

    public $a, $b, $c, $d, $e;

    public function __construct() {
         spl_autoload_register(array($this, 'autoload',));
         $this->a = 'a';
         // blah blah blah
         new RouterGriff($this);
    }

    private function autoload($name) {
         // autoload function
    }
}

new Griff();

You will notice that RouterGriff is instantiated inside Griff::__construct(), RouterGriff looks like below:

final class RouterGriff {

    private $griff;

    public function __construct(Griff $griff) {
         $this->griff = $griff;
         $this->griff->b = 'b';
         $this->griff->c = 'c';
    }
}

My question is as follows; you will notice I am setting variables for properties that are stored in Griff from RouterGriff as I want a registry kind of structure to my application but do not want to use a singleton.

Would it be better if I just had the properties set in RouterGriff instead of Griff? Or is passing Griff around to every class a valid way of doing things, considering my application could go 10 classes deep before it outputs anything?

I hope I made sense and thank you

EDIT

By the other way I ment doing it this way,

final class Griff {

    public $a;

    public function __construct() {
         spl_autoload_register(array($this, 'autoload',));
         $this->a = 'a';
         // blah blah blah
         new RouterGriff();
    }

    private function autoload($name) {
         // autoload function
    }
}

new Griff();

final class RouterGriff {

    public $b, $c;

    public function __construct() {
         $this->b = 'b';
         $this->c = 'c';
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Depends on what your classes are meant for. What should they do? Are you planning to use these classes afterwards (in next projects)? If so, don't you think that making them just work independently (i.e., no need to instantiate Griff to create RouterGriff) would be more convinient? –  madfriend Jul 21 '12 at 20:04
    
Yes I am just trying to write a mini MVC for my home projects to stem from and for the learning aspect, it is my first time trying too. Are you saying that if it is specific to that class have it as a property of that class? –  Griff Jul 21 '12 at 20:16
    
Sidenote: I advise you strongly to take a look at existing MVC solutions (Yii, Kohana, Symfony, Yaf, Laravel, whatever) and make something yourself afterwards. I've made a mistake and spent half a year writing up MVC on my own, without any lookups. You are sure to meet some ties. But as I understood, breaking the ties yourself is just making new ones. So it's good to learn from other solutions and start writing after that. –  madfriend Jul 21 '12 at 20:28
    
Your code looks wired. No offence please, but you should keep things more apart, e.g. the autoloader is the autoloader not the main class. Why is there a main class anyway? What about final for nothing? And so on and so forth. In only these little lines of code. I'd say @madfriend suggestion is not bad, even if you pick a bad framework, you don't do the mistakes your own :) –  hakre Jul 21 '12 at 21:11
add comment

3 Answers 3

The answer to you question you are looking for is named "dependency injection" or "dependency injection container". This is a wide topic filling books. If you are interessted in this topic, I can suggest you: Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship (Robert C. Martin)

share|improve this answer
add comment

If you're talking about global application settings (Which I think you are), just use constants.

They're global, but cannot be changed, and they are easy to write and use.

share|improve this answer
    
I have read time and time again that the use of globals is not the way to go, same as singletons and am trying to write something that isn't a requirement of them. –  Griff Jul 21 '12 at 20:15
    
The use of globals is not recommended because anyone and everyone can change them, which makes the application state unpredictable. But constants may only be defined once, and cannot change throughout the entire application. They were made for global application settings, exactly for that reason. It's fine to use them, as they are not like normal global variables or singletons. –  Second Rikudo Jul 21 '12 at 20:17
    
The use of globals is not recommended because of static global state. Constants can introduce a similar problem. Instead pass that part of the configuration to where it is needed. Also, you should understand what the problems with globals is so you can use them effectively and so you know where to not use them - do not only believe in some rules of thumb like singletons are bad, that does not let you progress as a programmer. The general concept of a global variable is per-se a very good one. We could not live without global variables in programming. –  hakre Jul 21 '12 at 21:13
add comment

I dont think youre wrong about injecting Griff into everything that is fine. As far as what classes get which propertied i think the depends on the nature of the properties. For example i would have included a GriffRequest in this example which is where you would access/store the parsed params the router supplied for example:

final class Griff {

    protected $_request,
              $_response,
              $_router;

    public function __construct() {
         spl_autoload_register(array($this, 'autoload',));
         $this->_request = new GriffRequest($this);
         $this->_response = new GriffResponse($this);
         $this->_router = new RouterGriff($this);
    }

    private function autoload($name) {
         // autoload function
    }

    public function getRequest() {  return $this->_request; }

    public function getResponse() {  return $this->_response; }

    public function getRouter() {  return $this->_router; }
}


final class RouterGriff {

    protected $_application;

    public function __construct(Griff $application) {
         $this->_application = $application;
    }

    public function route() {
        // do stuff with request
        // assign params
        $request = $application->getRequest();
        $request->a = 'value';
        $request->b = 'value2';
    }
}

If you make Griff store a ref to all the important submodules of the app and then inject Griff into all those modules then you can get access to everything you might need by going through Griff at some point. You can always make convenience getters if you feel the chain is to long.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.