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Consider this simple program

class Shape
{
public:
    virtual double getArea() = 0;

};

class Rectangle : public Shape
{
    int width;
    int height;

public:
    Rectangle( int w , int h ) :width(w) , height(h) {}

    double getArea() const
    {
        return width * height;
    }
};


int main() {

    Rectangle* r = new Rectangle(4,2);
}

Trying to compile this problem gives me

 'Rectangle' : cannot instantiate abstract class

Why is this not allowed in C++ when covariant return types are ? Of course I can fix the program by making Rectangle::getArea to be a non-const function but I am curious as to why the language designers decided otherwise.

EDIT

Lot of people have mentioned in their answers how the signature is different. But so is

class Shape
{
public:
    virtual BaseArea* getArea() = 0;

};

class Rectangle : public Shape
{
public:
    virtual RectangleArea* getArea();
};

but C++ went out of their to allow it when C# doesn't.

C++ supports covariant return types because if i expect an interface to return an BaseArea* and an implemenation that returns as RectangleArea* it is ok if RectangleArea derives from BaseArea because my contract is met.

In the same lines isn't an implementation that provides an non-mutating function satisfying an interface that only asks for a mutating function.

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1  
It helps to start with a title that better "focuses" the rest of the post :-) –  user166390 Jul 21 '12 at 19:58
3  
"Please read the full question and don't post an workaround" - It's not a "workaround", it is the difference between correct and incorrect, logical and illogical. Really, think it through and imagine the problematic scenarios that would arise if this were allowed. –  Ed S. Jul 21 '12 at 20:02
1  
The answer to your last question (and you should probably stop changing your question since it makes things confusing) is no: a RectangleArea is a BaseArea, while a const pointer may not be safely cast to a non-const one. The opposite you could argue would be acceptable (overriding a const method with a non-const one), but the fact is that is not how it works, and arguing about that is not really what this site is about. –  vanza Jul 21 '12 at 20:30
    
@vanza They only edits that I made to the question were in the spirit of the original question I asked. But I think it was missed in people jumping to answer it with a workaround that I mentioned I was aware of –  parapura rajkumar Jul 21 '12 at 20:38
    
+1 I was wondering about the exact same thing yesterday :) –  FredOverflow Jul 22 '12 at 11:44

6 Answers 6

Because you failed to override

virtual double getArea() = 0;

That is not the same as

virtual double getArea() const = 0;

It's not the same function; both could coexist within a single class definition.

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1  
-1? Why? You are asking what the motivation behind this was. It has nothing to do with "motivation". If you understand that both functions are different and that both could exist in a class definition simultaneously (as I said) then you should immediately realize why this could never be allowed –  Ed S. Jul 21 '12 at 19:57
    
Both of us missed the last sentence of the question. (It wasn't my downvote btw...) –  Mysticial Jul 21 '12 at 19:58
5  
@Mysticial: I don't think so though. This has nothing to do with covariance; both of those functions are distinct and all sorts of illogical situations would arise if this were allowed.. –  Ed S. Jul 21 '12 at 19:58
    
Agreed, so I assume the OP's question is why they are different? –  Mysticial Jul 21 '12 at 20:09

What would happen in this case:

struct base
{
    virtual void foo(); // May implement copy-on write
    virtual void foo() const;
};

struct derived : base
{
    // Only specialize the const version, the non const
    // default suits me well. How would I specify that I don't
    // want the non-const version to be overriden ?
    void foo() const;
};
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The C++ spec could have easily stated that foo() in derived overrides both foo() and foo() const –  parapura rajkumar Jul 21 '12 at 20:20
1  
@parapurarajkumar: My point is how would you specify that you don't want this behavior ? –  Alexandre C. Jul 21 '12 at 20:46

It is because a const method has a different signature than a non const method. So the compiler is looking for a method that is not implemented. Presumably, the non const version could do something quite different from the const version. However, if that is the semantic you want, you can easily provide it:

class Shape
{
public:
    virtual double getArea() {
        return static_cast<const Shape *>(this)->getArea();
    }
    virtual double getArea() const = 0;
};

In your edit, you provide an example of covariant return types:

C++ supports covariant return types because if i expect an interface to return an BaseArea* and an implemenation that returns as RectangleArea* it is ok if RectangleArea derives from BaseArea because my contract is met.

The return value of a method or a function has never been a part of its signature. The const-ness of a method has no bearing on the return value. It affects the object of the method call, essentially making the first argument of the function a pointer to const object. And function and method arguments control its signature (among other things, like its name, whether it's static, et al.).

You asked more specifically:

In the same lines isn't an implementation that provides an non-mutating function satisfying an interface that only asks for a mutating function.

Even if the language could (and I think it in fact does in some circumstance) resolve to the const version, it still requires that an implementation be provided for the non const version, since that is the method that was declared as pure virtual.

For a case of calling the const version when the non const is also available, consider this:

class Shape {
public:
    virtual double getArea() {
        std::cout << "non-const getArea" << std::endl;
        return static_cast<const Shape *>(this)->getArea();
    }
    virtual double getArea() const = 0;
};

Coupled with the Rectangle in your example. Then:

Rectangle *r = new Rectangle(4,2);
Shape *s = r;
r->getArea(); // calls const version
s->getArea(); // call non-const version
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Most of the answer say why it's not allowed in terms of the current rules of the language, instead of saying why the rules were written that way. I'll try to answer why the rules couldn't have been the way you suggest.

Stroustrup's Design & Evolution of C++ book describes why the overriding rules were relaxed to allow covariant returns, which weren't always allowed in C++. So one answer to your question would be that originally overrides had to be exact matches for the signature, and an exception was made for "compatible" return types that don't weaken the contract of a virtual function. It's possible they just weren't relaxed further because noone thought of it or noone suggested it. D&E does mention other possible relaxations of the overriding rules but says "We felt that the benefits from allowing such conversions through overriding would not outweigh the implementation cost and the potential for confusing users." That's relevant because I think your idea has plenty of potential for confusing users, and can actually cause safety problems, specifically it weakens the type system.

Consider:

class Square : public Rectangle
{
public:
  explicit Square(int side) : Rectangle(side, side) { }

  virtual double getArea() // N.B. non-const, overrides Shape::getArea
  {
    // class author decides this would be a sensible "sanity check"
    // (I'm not suggesting this is a good implementation)
    if (height != width)
      height = width;
    return Rectangle::getArea();
  }
};

const Square s(2);

int main()
{

  double (Rectangle::*area)() const = &Rectangle::getArea;
  double d = (s.*area)();
}

I believe that your idea would make this code valid, a const member function is invoked on a const object, but actually it is a virtual function so it calls Square::getArea() which is non-const and so it tries to modify a const object, which could be stored in read-only memory and so would result in a segfault.

This is just one example of how allowing your overriding relaxation in the Shape example could result in undefined behaviour, I'm sure in more realistic code there could be bigger, maybe subtler problems.

You could argue that the compiler should not allow a non-const function to override Rectangle::getArea and so should reject Square::getArea ("once a virtual function has gone const it can't go back") but that would make hierarchies very fragile. Adding or removing intermediate base classes with getArea functions with different constness would change whether Square::getArea() is an override or an overload. There is already some fragility like this with virtual functions, especially covariant returns, but according to D&E Stroustrup considered covariant returns useful because "the relaxation allows people to do something important within the type system instead of using casts." I don't think allowing const functions to override non-const ones fits nicely within the type-system, and doesn't allow doing anything important, and doesn't get rid of casts to allow a new (safe) techniques to be used.

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A method can be overloaded to have both a version that is const and one that is not. (Since the return type is not part of the unique signature of a method, and a method might accept no arguments, const can be the only way to distinguish between something that returns, say, const X* or X*.)

If the compiler did not require you to be precise about this, someone could add a non-const version to the base class and suddenly you'd be overriding a different method.

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The const part has been mentioned so I skip this. Let's assume you consider your base class as a contract you want to be sure to fulfill. Since const and non-const versions of a function can coexist and should coextist you should be told if you do not fulfill the given contract.

Imagine a base class that has a const and non const method, e.g. a container with operator[] in both flavors. Now you inherit but do not provide both functions. Your child does not fulfill the contract and does not provide the required functionality. So you should get an error since your child might not be usable via polymorphism

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