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This works

Toying with C++11, I tried to build a function which concatenates arbitrary objects by writing them to a ostringstream. As a helper function for those, I have a variadic helper function which appends a single item to an existing ostream (More context given in the full paste below):

template<class Head, class... Tail>
std::ostream& append(std::ostream& out, const Head& head, const Tail&... tail)
{
  return append(out << head, tail...);
}

This fails

But then I thought that there might be some objects which, when <<-applied to a stream, will not return an ostream but instead some placeholder. So it would be cool to have the stream type a template argument as well:

  1 #include <iostream>
  2 #include <sstream>
  3 
  4 template<typename Stream>
  5 Stream& append(Stream& out) {
  6   return out;
  7 }
  8 
  9 template<class Stream, class Head, class... Tail>
 10 auto append(Stream& out, const Head& head, const Tail&... tail)
 11   -> decltype(append(out << head, tail...))  // <<<<< This is the important line!
 12 {
 13   return append(out << head, tail...);
 14 }
 15 
 16 template<class... Args>
 17 std::string concat(const Args&... args) {
 18   std::ostringstream s;
 19   append(s, args...);
 20   return s.str();
 21 }
 22 
 23 int main() {
 24   std::cout << concat("foo ", 3, " bar ", 7) << std::endl;
 25 }

But g++-4.7.1 will refuse to compile this.

Changing all uses of Stream in the signature back to std::ostream will not make it any better, so I assume that the new function declaration syntax is playing a major role here ­– even though gcc claims to support it since 4.4.

Error message

The error message is rather cryptic, and doesn't tell me what's going on here. But perhaps you can make any sense of it.

 In instantiation of ‘std::string concat(const Args& ...) [with Args = {char [5], int, char [6], int}; std::string = std::basic_string<char>]’:
24:44:   required from here
19:3: error: no matching function for call to ‘append(std::ostringstream&, const char [5], const int&, const char [6], const int&)’
19:3: note: candidates are:
5:9: note: template<class Stream> Stream& append(Stream&)
5:9: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
19:3: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 5 provided
10:6: note: template<class Stream, class Head, class ... Tail> decltype (append((out << head), append::tail ...)) append(Stream&, const Head&, const Tail& ...)
10:6: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
 In substitution of ‘template<class Stream, class Head, class ... Tail> decltype (append((out << head), tail ...)) append(Stream&, const Head&, const Tail& ...) [with Stream = std::basic_ostringstream<char>; Head = char [5]; Tail = {int, char [6], int}]’:
19:3:   required from ‘std::string concat(const Args& ...) [with Args = {char [5], int, char [6], int}; std::string = std::basic_string<char>]’
24:44:   required from here
10:6: error: no matching function for call to ‘append(std::basic_ostream<char>&, const int&, const char [6], const int&)’
10:6: note: candidate is:
5:9: note: template<class Stream> Stream& append(Stream&)
5:9: note:   template argument deduction/substitution failed:
10:6: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 4 provided

Question

So my core question is this:
Is there a good reason for this code to fail?

I'd be interested either in some quote from the standard which says my code is invalid, or some insight as to what's going wrong here in the implementation. If anyone should find a gcc bug for this, that would be an answer, too. I haven't been able to find a suitable report. A way to make this work would be great, too, although using std::ostream only works well enough for my current application. Input about how other compilers handle this is appreciated as well, but won't be enough for an answer I'd consider to accept.

share|improve this question
    
I find it interesting that you add the code with line numbers, and the error with line numbers but those numbers don't match. Are you sure that the error is in the trailing return type? You can test this by making append return void (you are not using the return type at all, so there is no need to return anything. (Note, I don't see anything obviously wrong with the code in a syntactical level, I believe it should compile. Have you tested other compilers?) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 22 '12 at 1:30
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Yes, it is the trailing return type. And in the light of the answer by Jonathan Wakely, that even makes sense. Using a void return type does make the problem vanish, and as you pointed out, it appears to be a perfect workaround. So I'd kindly ask you to propose that as an answer as well, so that I can give you an upvote on it, too. Those answers would complement one another nicely, one giving the reason and the other a workaround. –  MvG Jul 22 '12 at 9:21
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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

3.3.2 [basic.scope.pdecl]
-1- The point of declaration for a name is immediately after its complete declarator (Clause 8) and before its initializer (if any), except as noted below.

A function declarator includes the trailing return type, so a function's own name is not in scope in its own trailing return type.

So in the expression decltype(append(out << head, tail...)) the only candidate function is the non-variadic append(Stream&) which cannot be used when the parameter pack tail is not empty, so deduction always fails when calling append with more than two arguments.

Therefore GCC is correct to reject the code.

This was discussed by the standard committee members last December and reported as a core issue, see CWG 1433.

The only workaround I can think of right now is to try using common_type, which will work for some cases, but probably fail for others:

template<class Stream, class Head, class... Tail>
  auto append(Stream& out, const Head& head, const Tail&... tail)
  -> typename std::common_type<decltype(out << head), decltype(out << tail)...>::type

This would fail if out << head << tail is valid but out << tail is not, or if any of the operator<< calls returns something that cannot be converted to the type returned by the other operator<< calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, in content as well as in presentation. Thanks! –  MvG Jul 22 '12 at 9:29
    
Another workaround in this particular case would be to enable ADL to find it at the point of instantiation. I suppose the type of s could be abused. Something like struct MyADLFinder : std::ostringstream {}; –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 22 '12 at 9:33
1  
Given the usage of the function, a third simpler workaround is not returning anything at all, and having a void return type. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 22 '12 at 15:59
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas, yes, that makes much more sense! –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 22 '12 at 16:54
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