Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Rails application I want to be able to store schema-less objects -- JSON data structure, that could have different structure from object to object, or for the same object at different times.

With ElasticSearch I can do this. However I would like to be use some kind of ORM with Rails for this.

Tried to do some testing with Tire tutorial, doing this in Rails console:

>>> c = Article.new :title =>'New article', :content => { :a => 'a', :b => 'b'}

I can see that content data stored as serialized YAML:

>> Article.last.content
=> "---\n:a: a\n:b: b\n"

This will require parsing search result to JSON, which is not a problem. But main question: will I be able to search inside serialized data? Is there a way to return attribute names from arbitrary structured data (like Object.keys)?

If not Tire, is there other solutions to do this?

share|improve this question
    
This looks like good use for NoSQL, try CouchDB or Mongo. It will be more flexible instead hack SQL. –  rado Jul 22 '12 at 7:54
    
Well, ElasticSearch is NoSQL ... –  Dmytro Jul 23 '12 at 6:47
    
@rado: Using elasticsearch for the outlined purpose is absolutely legitimate. Moreover, the original author never stated the intention to "hack SQL", nor is it evident from the code he posted. –  karmi Jul 23 '12 at 11:27
    
@Dmytro i does not work with ElasticSearch. But if you want have schema-less objects, NoSQL are more preferable, because whole data are serialized and you can search all attributes. –  rado Jul 23 '12 at 18:19
    
@karmi sorry for my uncertain answer, i know that is legitimate. I want to only answer that nosql would be more practical for this issue –  rado Jul 23 '12 at 18:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not really sure what you're up to here, but Tire does come with a drop-in replacement for ActiveRecord integration, just include Tire::Model::Persistence in your class. You may also define properties (with mappings, type casting, default values, etc):

class Article

  include Tire::Model::Persistence

  property :title
  property :published_on, type: 'date'
  property :tags,         analyzer: 'keyword', default: []

end

The Tire README and integration tests have all the info.

Of course you're able to search inside the content attribute -- it's just a matter of proper mapping.

If you're after some specific behaviour, please update your question...

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, It looks like Persistence is what I need. Should always read README's to the bottom :) –  Dmytro Jul 24 '12 at 2:20
    
So does the answer warrant accually accepting it, at the very least? –  karmi Jul 25 '12 at 9:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.