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The code function that I'm specifically talking about is getCount(). There are several other functions that I haven't included here (such as finding the height of this binary tree and the total node count) which work just fine, with correct results. getCount() on the other hand produces segmentation fault except for the first node (the top, first node of the tree). Any ideas?

#include <string> 
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

class Word {
    public:
        std::string keyval;
        long long count;
        Word() {
            keyval = "";
            count = 0;
        }
        Word(std::string S) {
            keyval = S;
            count = 1;
        }
};

class WordBST {
    public:
        Word node;
        WordBST* left_child;
        WordBST* right_child;
        WordBST(std::string key);        
        void add(std::string key){
            if (key == node.keyval){
                node.count++;
            }
            else if (key < node.keyval){
                if (left_child == NULL){
                    left_child = new WordBST(key);
                }else {
                    left_child->add(key);
                }
            }else {
                if (right_child == NULL){
                    right_child = new WordBST(key);
                }else {
                    right_child->add(key);
                }
            }
        }
        long long getCount(std::string key){
            if (key == node.keyval){
                return (node.count);
            }
            else if (key < node.keyval){
                left_child->getCount(key);
            }else if(key > node.keyval){
                right_child->getCount(key);
            }else return 0;
            /*else {
                if (key < node.keyval){
                    left_child->getCount(key);
                }else{
                    right_child->getCount(key);
                }
            }*/
        }
};

WordBST::WordBST(std::string key) {
    node = Word(key);
    left_child = NULL;
    right_child = NULL;
}
share|improve this question
3  
Have you tried using a debugger? – Adam Rosenfield Jul 22 '12 at 0:58
    
Are left_child and right_child valid pointers when you dereference them the first time? – Aesthete Jul 22 '12 at 0:59
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is because you let your code run off the end without hitting a return statement.

long long getCount(std::string key){
    if (key == node.keyval){
        return (node.count);
    } else if (left_child && key < node.keyval){
        return left_child->getCount(key); // Added return
    } else if(right_child && key > node.keyval){
        return right_child->getCount(key); // Added return
    }
    return 0;
}

You also need to add null checks in more than one place throughout the code. Your add method has them, but your getCount does not.

share|improve this answer
    
What does getCount not returning a value have to do with segmentation faults? – Aesthete Jul 22 '12 at 1:03
1  
@Aesthete According to C++ spec, not returning a value from a function that is declared as returning a value is undefined behavior. – dasblinkenlight Jul 22 '12 at 1:04
    
@dasblinkenlight Short and sweet solution. This worked fantastically. Thank you. I'm wondering though, what was actually happening without the return statement? Oh and yes, you're right I'll implement the null checks right now. – Nico Bellic Jul 22 '12 at 1:05
    
@Aesthete add() function is void, so no return needed there. getCount() on the other hand must return a long long. I should have noticed that right away. EDIT: I see dasblinkenlight answered it before I did. – Nico Bellic Jul 22 '12 at 1:06
    
@Nico - I realise that a function declared with a return type should return a value, I'm just not convinced that it will cause segmentation fault. But as dasblinkenlight mentioned, undefined behaviour is undefined behaviour. – Aesthete Jul 22 '12 at 1:11

I think you should write getCount() like this:

    long long getCount(std::string key){
    if (key == node.keyval){
        return (node.count);
    }
    else if (key < node.keyval && left_child != NULL){
        return left_child->getCount(key);
    }else if(key > node.keyval && right_child != NULL){
        return right_child->getCount(key);
    }else return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, I already implemented the null checks. – Nico Bellic Jul 22 '12 at 1:20

You do not check to see if the children of your node exist before calling their methods.

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