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I had a beautiful pure HTML mockup for a webpage that I am now recreating in GWT. I'm attempting to use the same css in my GWT app, but that's not working well for me. GWT styles seem to override mine. I know I can completely disable the GWT styles, however I would prefer to have the styling for the GWT components that I'm adding (tab panel, button, etc). Is there a way to disable GWT styling, and only enable it for components that I choose?

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See my answer below. –  Duncan Calvert Aug 15 '13 at 6:01
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12 Answers 12

Well I managed to solve the problem with overriding standard css rules by inheriting my project's .css file in .gwt.xml file of my project. When you set your user defined .css this way - AFTER the usual inherit line - it will have the higher priority in cascading one rule than the same rule, defined at standard gwt stylesheets. It took a couple of hours to figure out how to inherit it properly, cause in first try just simply typing <stylesheet src='WebTerminal.css' /&gt; in my .gwt.xml file and commenting out <link type="text/css" rel="stylesheet" href="WebTerminal.css"> in my .html host page didn't bring me any result. So, the solution is to use relative path, when you set your .css in .gwt.xml config, like this:

<stylesheet src='../WebTerminal.css' />

Notice ../ in the beginning of my relative path. To figure out how it works, add Window.alert(GWT.getModuleBaseURL()); as the first line of your onModuleLoad() method. It will show you something like https://localhost:8080/myproject/resouces/webtermial/, when in fact your hosted page URL would look like https://localhost:8080/myproject/resouces/WebTerminal.html. Here myproject/resouces is a directory, that contains your .css file, and when you set it in .gwt.xml like <stylesheet src='WebTerminal.css' />, the compiler starts looking for myproject/resouces/webtermial/WebTerminal.css and can't find it. That's why adding ../ sometimes is the only thing to do to solve your problem.

In addition to the words said above I only want to mention that I was not successful in attempt to find any description of this matter in the latest documentary or throughout the discussions taking place at google groups. Wish it was less harder to figure out, because GWT has much more really complex problems itself, than one, which must have had an exhausted description inside tutorial.

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This works! Thank you Vitrums! One thing of note: if you put it in your com.whatever.public folder, that will work much better. See this guy's page –  Ryan Shillington Mar 27 '12 at 3:11
    
See caveats in this post regarding refreshing new styles problem at development mode. But it's still a good point. At present I use ClientBundle facility to handle styles. You can use @external directive to have an access to namespace of those styles, which were defined somewhere outside. In our case you'll be able to rewrite standard GWT resources. –  vitrums May 17 '12 at 16:25
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That was it, thanks. (First I forgot the '../', then it didn't work.) –  Johanna Feb 27 '13 at 11:23
    
One point to note on this is that the css file name is case sensitive on appspot.com (but not while testing in dev mode on a windows box). A few frustrating minutes ensued :) –  IrishDubGuy Mar 31 '13 at 19:31
    
I put my top custom css in a source package called "resources", then I use the stylesheet tag without the "../" –  Federico Pugnali Sep 2 '13 at 23:07
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The reason your style is being overridden is that when gwt compiles your project, it includes it's own default css file. The type of css file is dependent on the type of default styling that you are using:

<inherits name='com.google.gwt.user.theme.clean.Clean'/>
<!-- <inherits name='com.google.gwt.user.theme.standard.Standard'/> -->
<!-- <inherits name='com.google.gwt.user.theme.chrome.Chrome'/> -->
<!-- <inherits name='com.google.gwt.user.theme.dark.Dark'/>     -->

In the above scenario, a clean.css file will be included, which, in turn, has the following generic styles that completely offset your template (the margin and background parameters always messed my templates up):

body, table td, select, button {
  font-family: Arial Unicode MS, Arial, sans-serif;
  font-size: small;
}
pre {
  font-family: "courier new", courier;
  font-size: small;
}
body {
  color: black;
 margin: 10px;
 border: 0px;
 padding: 0px;
 background: #fff;
 direction: ltr;
}
a, a:visited {
  color: #0066cc;
  text-decoration:none;
}

a:hover {
  color: #0066cc;
  text-decoration:underline;
}

select {
    background: white;
}

If you remove them, and leave everything else intact (specifically, if you leave everything that starts with 'gwt'), your template won't be affected.

Don't forget -- you have to remove these elements every time you compile your project.

Hope this helps.

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Seems to be the only way for links, since at least Chrome will always prefer the link styles from clean.css –  Stroboskop Jul 23 '11 at 22:28
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You don't need to touch clean.css to disable the styles that it adds. Simply remove the inherits line referenced above in your *.gwt.xml module definition file. This way you don't need to worry about re-applying your edits with each compile. –  pb2q Feb 17 '12 at 3:50
    
That's only if you have a css element definition for EVERY gwt widget. In most cases you would want to leave the bulk of the css definitions provided by GWT. –  Vladimir Feb 17 '12 at 21:05
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The easiest thing to do is to override the styles you don't want. For example, if you don't want gwt to style your buttons, you can define the style for the gwt-Button class in your own css file.

More information here.

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It doesn't work that way. I asked similar question here. –  ruslan Feb 20 '12 at 4:28
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You can use < !important > declaration. It's one of easiest choices

--- GWT ----

.gwt-PopupPanel {
border: 3px solid #E7E7E7;
padding: 3px;
background: white;
}

--- Custom style ---

.gwt-PopupPanel {
padding: 0px !important;
}

--- Result ---

.gwt-PopupPanel {
border: 3px solid #E7E7E7;
padding: 0px;
background: white;
}
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Just for anyone else facing a similar situation, to elaborate on the answer that stringo0 answered, I put my styles in the 'GWT_APPNAME.css' where GWT_APPNAME is the name of the file that your GWT Eclipse plugin generates when you create your project.

This css file should be available directly under the war folder with the same name as your welcome page html. I tried this for overriding the gwt-anchor styles and it worked.

.gwt-Anchor:link {color:#FF0000;}
.gwt-Anchor:visited {color:#00FF00;}
.gwt-Anchor:hover {color:#FF00FF;}
.gwt-Anchor:active {color:#0000FF;}
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There is a special resource you can inherit from to remove the clean.css file:

<inherits name='com.google.gwt.user.theme.standard.StandardResources'/> 

So find your *.gwt.xml file and search for

<inherits name='com.google.gwt.user.theme.standard.Standard'/>

And replace it with the line above.

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Solution is actually to create a public/css folder in the same directory as your gwt.xml.

Add these two lines to your gwt.xml:

<stylesheet src='css/project-name.css'/>

and

<public path='public'/>

Place your project-name.css file in the css folder.

This works with both GWT Compile and Super Dev Mode.

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This is a quick, but hopefully helpful answer.

What I did is I copied over the styles I do want from the default GWT Style. For example, if you picked the standard style, GWT makes a standard.css in the war/WEB-INF/appengine-generated (somewhere along those lines) - I copied over all the button styles to my app's css file, and then in the config file chose not to use the standard GWT style.

This did the trick for us.

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You can remove the default GWT styling with:

widget.setStyleName("");

Or specify your own style.

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It doesn't work that way. –  ruslan Feb 20 '12 at 4:25
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Vitrus' answer did work for me, thanks! However changes in the .css files were not reflected in the web app when reloading the page; it seems to be a cache issue. Refreshing with Ctrl+F5 solves this. More information here: http://productforums.google.com/forum/#!topic/chrome/_oCbvfRwTok.

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I had a similar problem trying to set a background image and setting a transparent background for the body element, I solved it by setting a specific style to the element so I could keep the other GWT styles:

<body id="elementId">...</body>

#elementId {
   background: transparent;
}

Hope it's useful for your specific problem.

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In gwt, 2.6 there is a folder called (gwt) in the generated JavaScript source and it has all the styles.

Try to delete it.

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