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I'm trying to do some operations in two dimensional matrices. I overloaded (+ , - and *) to do the calculations. I have a problem regarding (I believe) memory management. Look at the following code:

Mtx M1(rows1,cols1,1.0); //call the constructor 
Mtx M2(rows2,cols2,2.0); //call the constructor 
Mtx M3(rows3,cols3,0.0); //call the constructor 

M3 = M1 + M2;
cout << M3 << endl;

Mtx Mtx::operator+(const Mtx &rhs)
{

double **ETS;
ETS = new double*[nrows];
for (int i = 0; i < rhs.nrows; i++) {
    ETS[i] = new double[rhs.ncols];
}
if (ETS == NULL) {
    cout << "Error Allocation on the Heap" << endl;
    exit(1);
}

for (int i = 0; i < rhs.nrows; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < rhs.ncols; j++) {
        ETS[i][j] = 0.0;
    }
}

for (int i = 0; i < rhs.nrows; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < rhs.ncols; j++) {
        ETS[i][j] = ets[i][j];
    }
}


for (int i = 0; i < rhs.nrows; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < rhs.ncols; j++) {
        ETS[i][j] = ETS[i][j] + rhs.ets[i][j];
    }
}

Mtx S(nrows, ncols, ETS);
delete [] ETS;
return S;
}

I think my problem is here:

Mtx S(nrows, ncols, ETS); 
delete [] ETS;
return S;

Is this a proper way to return ETS? Or do you think the problem is with the constructor? I got no output when I did the above return!

This is the constructor for Mtx S(nrows, ncols, ETS);

Mtx::Mtx(int rows, int cols, double **ETS)
{
ets = new double*[nrows];
for (int i = 0; i < nrows; i++) {
    ets[i] = new double[ncols];
}
for (int i = 0; i < nrows; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < ncols; j++) {
        ets[i][j] = ETS[i][j];
    }
  }
} 

My copy constructor:

Mtx::Mtx(const Mtx& rhs)
:nrows(rhs.nrows), ncols(rhs.ncols)
    {
ets = new double*[nrows];
for (int i = 0; i < nrows; i++) {
    ets[i] = new double[ncols];
}

for (int i = 0; i < rhs.nrows; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < rhs.ncols; j++) {
        ets[i][j] = rhs.ets[i][j];
    }
  }
} 

I overloaded << to print M3. It works fine because I tested printing M1 and M2.

I also did the following, and still not working:

Mtx S(nrows, ncols, ETS);
for (int i = 0; i < rhs.nrows; i++) {
    delete [] ETS[i];
}
delete [] ETS;
return S;
}
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1  
@Johnsyweb: In the link, you can replace version with "release" to always point to latest release, i.e. boost.org/doc/libs/release/libs/numeric/ublas/doc/matrix.htm –  user405725 Jul 22 '12 at 3:16
1  
The problem may be in class Mtx's copy constructor because return S requires a copy construction. If you didn't do deep copy, the result would be wrong. –  timrau Jul 22 '12 at 3:21
1  
Programmers often confuse multidimensional arrays with arrays of pointers. You seem to have done this. –  Johnsyweb Jul 22 '12 at 3:31
1  
Your copy constructor leaks the memory that was previously allocated to the object. Since your class manually manages a resource (memory) you should study The Rule of Three. In addition, you should learn good practices for Operator Overloading. –  Blastfurnace Jul 22 '12 at 4:16
1  
@Blastfurnace Yeah, I think you are right about the assignment operator. I read about The Rule Of Three before, and this not my first time working with this. Why are you guessing that the copy constructor leaks memory? What did you notice? –  Jack in the Box Jul 22 '12 at 4:46
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3 Answers

You could instead use

std::vector< std::vector<double> > 

instead of

double ** 

that will be more safe as far as bounds are concerned. And you only have to use functions

std::vector::size() 

and

std::vector::clear() 

in the destructor. :)

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Yes, there is a problem where you pointed out. You have to delete all the memory that is pointed to in the pointers in ETS. So, it should be more like:

for (int i = 0; i < rhs.nrows; i++) {
    delete [] ETS[i];
}
delete [] ETS;

I good rule is that for each call to new you have to call delete; You allocate the array with nrows+1 calls to new so you have to delete with the same number. That's not hard and fast but it'll clue you in when something is going wrong.

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I did this, but still not working –  Jack in the Box Jul 22 '12 at 4:05
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The common way to implement binary arithmetic operators is to define operator+= as a class member function and operator+ as a free-standing function. Note the + operator is implemented in terms of the += operator and it takes its left operand by copy. As long as your copy constructor and assignment operator are correct this should work.

// member function
Mtx& Mtx::operator+=(const Mtx &rhs)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < nrows; ++i) {
        for (int j = 0; j < ncols; ++i) {
            ets[i][j] += rhs.ets[i][j];
        }
    }
    return *this;
}

// non-member function
Mtx operator+(Mtx lhs, const Mtx &rhs)
{
    lhs += rhs;
    return lhs;
}
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